Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Continuing and increasing reliance on fossil fuels to satisfy our population’s energy demands has encouraged the search for renewable carbon-free and carbon-neutral sources, such as hydrogen gas or CO2 reduction products. Inspired by nature, one of the objectives of this dissertation was to develop protein-based strategies that can be applied in the production of green fuels. The first project of this dissertation aimed at developing a controllable strategy to incorporate domains with different functions (e. g. catalytic sites, electron transfer modules, light absorbing subunits) into a single multicomponent system. This was accomplished through the rational design of 2,2’-bipyridine modified dimeric …

Contributors
Alcala-Torano, Rafael de Jesus, Ghirlanda, Giovanna, Moore, Ana L, et al.
Created Date
2019

This study aims to address the deficiencies of the Marcus model of electron transfer (ET) and then provide modifications to the model. A confirmation of the inverted energy gap law, which is the cleanest verification so far, is presented for donor-acceptor complexes. In addition to the macroscopic properties of the solvent, the physical properties of the solvent are incorporated in the model via the microscopic solvation model. For the molecules studied in this dissertation, the rate constant first increases with cooling, in contrast to the prediction of the Arrhenius law, and then decreases at lower temperatures. Additionally, the polarizability of …

Contributors
Waskasi, Morteza, Matyushov, Dmitry, Richert, Ranko, et al.
Created Date
2019

The physiological phenomenon of sensing temperature is detected by transient receptor (TRP) ion channels, which are pore forming proteins that reside in the membrane bilayer. The cold and hot sensing TRP channels named TRPV1 and TRPM8 respectively, can be modulated by diverse stimuli and are finely tuned by proteins and lipids. PIRT (phosphoinositide interacting regulator of TRP channels) is a small membrane protein that modifies TRPV1 responses to heat and TRPM8 responses to cold. In this dissertation, the first direct measurements between PIRT and TRPM8 are quantified with nuclear magnetic resonance and microscale thermophoresis. Using Rosetta computational biology, TRPM8 is …

Contributors
Sisco, Nicholas John, Van Horn, Wade D, Mills, Jeremy H, et al.
Created Date
2018

Biological systems have long been known to utilize two processes for energy conservation: substrate-level phosphorylation and electron transport phosphorylation. Recently, a new bioenergetic process was discovered that increases ATP yields: flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB). This process couples an energetically favorable reaction with an energetically unfavorable one to conserve energy in the organism. Currently, the mechanisms of enzymes that perform FBEB are unknown. In this work, NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (Nfn), a FBEB enzyme, is used as a model system to study this phenomenon. Nfn is a heterodimeric enzyme that reversibly couples the exergonic reduction of NADP+ by reduced ferredoxin with …

Contributors
Jennings, David, Jones, Anne K, Redding, Kevin E, et al.
Created Date
2018

Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging method that allows for structural discovery to be performed on biomacromolecules during their dynamic trajectory through a reaction pathway after activation. This is performed by triggering a reaction on an ensemble of molecules in nano- or microcrystals and then using femtosecond X-ray laser pulses produced by an X-ray free electron laser to collect near-instantaneous data on the crystal. A full data set can be collected by merging a sufficient number of these patterns together and multiple data sets can be collected at different points along the reaction pathway by manipulating the delay time …

Contributors
Coe, Jesse, Fromme, Petra, Sayres, Scott, et al.
Created Date
2018

Glycans are monosaccharide-based heteropolymers that are found covalently attached to many different proteins and lipids and are ubiquitously displayed on the exterior surfaces of cells. Serum glycan composition and structure are well known to be altered in many different types of cancer. In fact, glycans represent a promising but only marginally accessed source of cancer markers. The approach used in this dissertation, which is referred to as “glycan node analysis”, is a molecularly bottom-up approach to plasma/serum (P/S) glycomics based on glycan linkage analysis that captures features such as α2-6 sialylation, β1-6 branching, and core fucosylation as single analytical signals. …

Contributors
Roshdiferdosi, Shadi, Borges, Chad R, Woodbury, Neal, et al.
Created Date
2018

The ability to manipulate the interaction between small molecules and biological macromolecules towards the study of disease pathogenesis has become a very important part of research towards treatment options for various diseases. The work described here shows both the use of DNA oligonucleotides as carriers for a nicotine hapten small molecule, and the use of microsomes to study the stability of compounds derived to treat mitochondrial diseases. Nicotine addiction is a worldwide epidemic because nicotine is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It is linked to early death, typically in the form of heart or lung disease. A …

Contributors
Schmierer, Margaret Louise, Hecht, Sidney M, Allen, James, et al.
Created Date
2016

Nature is a master at organizing biomolecules in all intracellular processes, and researchers have conducted extensive research to understand the way enzymes interact with each other through spatial and orientation positioning, substrate channeling, compartmentalization, and more. DNA nanostructures of high programmability and complexity provide excellent scaffolds to arrange multiple molecular/macromolecular components at nanometer scale to construct interactive biomolecular complexes and networks. Due to the sequence specificity at different positions of the DNA origami nanostructures, spatially addressable molecular pegboard with a resolution of several nm (less than 10 nm) can be achieved. So far, DNA nanostructures can be used to build …

Contributors
Yang, Yuhe Renee, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

The energy required in a eukaryotic cell is provided by mitochondria. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) coupled with oxidative phosphorylation generates ATP. During electron transport, electron leakage from the ETC produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). In healthy cells, there are preventive and defense mechanisms in place to manage ROS. Maintaining a steady balance of ROS is very important because overproduction of ROS can lead to several pathological conditions. There are several strategies to prevent ROS production. Addition of external antioxidants is widely used among them. Discussed in the first part of Chapter 1 is the mitochondrial ETC, ROS production and …

Contributors
Roy Chowdhury, Sandipan, Hecht, Sidney, Gould, Ian, et al.
Created Date
2016

Efficient separation techniques for organelles and bacteria in the micron- and sub-micron range are required for various analytical challenges. Mitochondria have a wide size range resulting from the sub-populations, some of which may be associated with diseases or aging. However, traditional methods can often not resolve within-species size variations. Strategies to separate mitochondrial sub-populations by size are thus needed to study the importance of this organelle in cellular functions. Additionally, challenges also exist in distinguishing the sub-populations of bio-species which differ in the surface charge while possessing similar size, such as Salmonella typhimurium (Salmonella). The surface charge of Salmonella wild-type …

Contributors
Luo, Jinghui, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015