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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


A lot of research can be seen in the field of social robotics that majorly concentrate on various aspects of social robots including design of mechanical parts and their move- ment, cognitive speech and face recognition capabilities. Several robots have been developed with the intention of being social, like humans, without much emphasis on how human-like they actually look, in terms of expressions and behavior. Fur- thermore, a substantial disparity can be seen in the success of results of any research involving ”humanizing” the robots’ behavior, or making it behave more human-like as opposed to research into biped movement, movement …

Contributors
Murthy, Shweta, Gaffar, Ashraf, Ghazarian, Arbi, et al.
Created Date
2017

Text Classification is a rapidly evolving area of Data Mining while Requirements Engineering is a less-explored area of Software Engineering which deals the process of defining, documenting and maintaining a software system's requirements. When researchers decided to blend these two streams in, there was research on automating the process of classification of software requirements statements into categories easily comprehensible for developers for faster development and delivery, which till now was mostly done manually by software engineers - indeed a tedious job. However, most of the research was focused on classification of Non-functional requirements pertaining to intangible features such as security, …

Contributors
Swadia, Japa Nimish, Ghazarian, Arbi, Bansal, Srividya, et al.
Created Date
2016

A well-defined Software Complexity Theory which captures the Cognitive means of algorithmic information comprehension is needed in the domain of cognitive informatics & computing. The existing complexity heuristics are vague and empirical. Industrial software is a combination of algorithms implemented. However, it would be wrong to conclude that algorithmic space and time complexity is software complexity. An algorithm with multiple lines of pseudocode might sometimes be simpler to understand that the one with fewer lines. So, it is crucial to determine the Algorithmic Understandability for an algorithm, in order to better understand Software Complexity. This work deals with understanding Software …

Contributors
Mannava, Manasa Priyamvada, Ghazarian, Arbi, Gaffar, Ashraf, et al.
Created Date
2016

Driver distraction research has a long history spanning nearly 50 years, intensifying in the last decade. The focus has always been on identifying the distractive tasks and measuring the respective harm level. As in-vehicle technology advances, the list of distractive activities grows along with crash risk. Additionally, the distractive activities become more common and complicated, especially with regard to In-Car Interactive System. This work's main focus is on driver distraction caused by the in-car interactive System. There have been many User Interaction Designs (Buttons, Speech, Visual) for Human-Car communication, in the past and currently present. And, all related studies suggest …

Contributors
Jahagirdar, Tanvi, Gaffar, Ashraf, Ghazarian, Arbi, et al.
Created Date
2015

Gathering and managing software requirements, known as Requirement Engineering (RE), is a significant and basic step during the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Any error or defect during the RE step will propagate to further steps of SDLC and resolving it will be more costly than any defect in other steps. In order to produce better quality software, the requirements have to be free of any defects. Verification and Validation (V&V;) of requirements are performed to improve their quality, by performing the V&V; process on the Software Requirement Specification (SRS) document. V&V; of the software requirements focused to a specific …

Contributors
Chughtai, Rehman, Ghazarian, Arbi, Bansal, Ajay, et al.
Created Date
2012