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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Networks naturally appear in many high-impact applications. The simplest model of networks is single-layered networks, where the nodes are from the same domain and the links are of the same type. However, as the world is highly coupled, nodes from different application domains tend to be interdependent on each other, forming a more complex network model called multi-layered networks. Among the various aspects of network studies, network connectivity plays an important role in a myriad of applications. The diversified application areas have spurred numerous connectivity measures, each designed for some specific tasks. Although effective in their own fields, none of …

Contributors
Chen, Chen, Tong, Hanghang, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2019

Mobile devices have penetrated into every aspect of modern world. For one thing, they are becoming ubiquitous in daily life. For the other thing, they are storing more and more data, including sensitive data. Therefore, security and privacy of mobile devices are indispensable. This dissertation consists of five parts: two authentication schemes, two attacks, and one countermeasure related to security and privacy of mobile devices. Specifically, in Chapter 1, I give an overview the challenges and existing solutions in these areas. In Chapter 2, a novel authentication scheme is presented, which is based on a user’s tapping or sliding on …

Contributors
Chen, Yimin, Zhang, Yanchao, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2018

Diffusion processes in networks can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the propagation of a rumor on social networks and cascading failures on power networks. Analysis of diffusion processes in networks can help us answer important questions such as the role and the importance of each node in the network for spreading the diffusion and how to top or contain a cascading failure in the network. This dissertation consists of three parts. In the first part, we study the problem of locating multiple diffusion sources in networks under the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model. Given a complete snapshot of …

Contributors
Chen, Zhen, Ying, Lei, Tong, Hanghang, et al.
Created Date
2018

Dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has great potential to address worldwide spectrum shortage by enhancing spectrum efficiency. It allows unlicensed secondary users to access the under-utilized spectrum when the primary users are not transmitting. On the other hand, the open wireless medium subjects DSA systems to various security and privacy issues, which might hinder the practical deployment. This dissertation consists of two parts to discuss the potential challenges and solutions. The first part consists of three chapters, with a focus on secondary-user authentication. Chapter One gives an overview of the challenges and existing solutions in spectrum-misuse detection. Chapter Two presents SpecGuard, …

Contributors
Jin, Xiaocong, Zhang, Yanchao, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Mobile devices are penetrating everyday life. According to a recent Cisco report [10], the number of mobile connected devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops, eReaders, and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) modules will hit 11.6 billion by 2021, exceeding the world's projected population at that time (7.8 billion). The rapid development of mobile devices has brought a number of emerging security and privacy issues in mobile computing. This dissertation aims to address a number of challenging security and privacy issues in mobile computing. This dissertation makes fivefold contributions. The first and second parts study the security and privacy issues in Device-to-Device communications. Specifically, …

Contributors
Sun, Jingchao, Zhang, Yanchao, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2017

The research on the topology and dynamics of complex networks is one of the most focused area in complex system science. The goals are to structure our understanding of the real-world social, economical, technological, and biological systems in the aspect of networks consisting a large number of interacting units and to develop corresponding detection, prediction, and control strategies. In this highly interdisciplinary field, my research mainly concentrates on universal estimation schemes, physical controllability, as well as mechanisms behind extreme events and cascading failure for complex networked systems. Revealing the underlying structure and dynamics of complex networked systems from observed data …

Contributors
Chen, Yuzhong Chen, Lai, Ying-Cheng, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2016

The purpose of information source detection problem (or called rumor source detection) is to identify the source of information diffusion in networks based on available observations like the states of the nodes and the timestamps at which nodes adopted the information (or called infected). The solution of the problem can be used to answer a wide range of important questions in epidemiology, computer network security, etc. This dissertation studies the fundamental theory and the design of efficient and robust algorithms for the information source detection problem. For tree networks, the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimator of the information source is …

Contributors
Zhu, Kai, Ying, Lei, Lai, Ying-Cheng, et al.
Created Date
2015

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts. The first part studies socially-aware mobile networking and computing. First, it studies random access control and power control under a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework. The socially-aware Nash equilibria (SNEs) are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies mobile crowdsensing under an incentive mechanism that exploits social trust assisted reciprocity (STAR). The efficacy of …

Contributors
Gong, Xiaowen, Zhang, Junshan, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015