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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Having accurate measurements of sedentary behaviors is important to understand relationships between sedentary behaviors and health outcomes and to evaluate changes in interventions and health promotion programs designed to reduce sedentary behaviors. This dissertation included three projects that examined measurement properties of wearable monitors used to measure sedentary behaviors. Project one examined the validity of three monitors: the ActiGraph GT3X+, activPAL™, and SenseWear 2. None of the monitors were equivalent with the criterion measure of oxygen uptake to estimate the energy cost of sedentary and light-intensity activities. The ActivPAL™ had the best accuracy as compared with the other monitors. In …

Contributors
Florez Pregonero, Argemiro Alberto, Ainsworth, Barbara E, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2017

The transition to college has been identified as a vulnerable period for weight gain and the onset of obesity. Research has shown that the gut microbiota is different in obese compared to lean individuals, but a period of weight gain has never been studied in free-living individuals. The objective of this longitudinal, observational study was to assess the association between changes in the intestinal microbiota and weight-related outcomes in healthy college students living in on-campus dormitories at Arizona State University (n=39). Anthropometric measures and fecal samples were collected at the beginning and end of the school year, and microbial relative …

Contributors
Journey, Elizabeth, Whisner, Corrie M, Bruening, Meredith, et al.
Created Date
2017

ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the effect a daily coconut oil supplement (2 grams) would have on a common serum marker of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein) and an indicator of oxidative stress (TBARS) when compared to the control group receiving a placebo capsule (white flour) in healthy, sedentary adults between the ages of 18-40 in Phoenix, Arizona. Design: This study was designed as secondary analyses of blood samples originally collected to study the effects of coconut oil supplementation on blood lipids and body composition. The original study consisted of 32 healthy, adult volunteers …

Contributors
Norman, Lisa Marie, Johnston, Carol, Shepard, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2017

There are limited studies exploring the direct relationship between coconut oil and cholesterol concentrations. Research in animals and a few intervention trials suggest that coconut oil increases the good cholesterol (high density lipoprotein, HDL) and thus reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Preliminary research at Arizona State University (ASU) has found similar results using coconut oil as a placebo, positive changes in HDL cholesterol concentrations were observed. The goal of this randomized, double blind, parallel two arm study, was to further examine the beneficial effects of a 2g supplement of coconut oil taken each day for 8 weeks on cholesterol …

Contributors
Shedden, Rachel Nikita, Johnston, Carol, Lespron, Christy, et al.
Created Date
2017

Physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and sleep are often associated with cardiometabolic biomarkers commonly found in metabolic syndrome. These relationships are well studied, and yet there are still questions on how each activity may affect cardiometabolic biomarkers. The objective of this study was to examine data from the BeWell24 studies to evaluate the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors and cardiometabolic biomarkers in middle age adults, while also determining if sleep quality and duration mediates this relationship. A group of inactive participants (N = 29, age = 52.1 ± 8.1 years, 38% female) with increased risk for cardiometabolic …

Contributors
Lanich, Boyd, Buman, Matthew, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2017

Scientific evidence strongly indicates that there are significant health benefits of breastfeeding. Lower breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity rates are found in vulnerable populations particularly among women of low socioeconomic status, and racial minorities such as immigrant, racial, and minority cultural groups. Breastfeeding disparities can contribute to negative health outcomes for the mothers, and their infants, and families. Muslim Arab immigrants are a fast-growing, under-studied, and underserved minority population in the United States. Little is known about breastfeeding practices and challenges facing this vulnerable population. Immigrant Muslim Arab mothers encounter breastfeeding challenges related to religion, language, different cultural beliefs, levels …

Contributors
Khasawneh, Wafa, Komnenich, Pauline, Petrov, Megan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Latino youth have substantially higher rates of obesity and T2D than their white peers. The higher prevalence of obesity and T2D among Latino youth places them at greater risk for cognitive dysfunction, an urgent and serious health threat to the United States. Exercise has been the cornerstone to combat the negative effects of obesity, diabetes and recent research also supports this effects for preventing cognitive dysfunction. A wealth of evidence suggests that a mediating mechanism linking exercise with brain health is BDNF, a cognitive biomarker that increases in the brain with exercise. BDNF is the most abundant neurotrophic factor that …

Contributors
Barraza, Estela, Shaibi, Gabriel Q., Swan, Pamela, et al.
Created Date
2016

Purpose: This study explored the potential correlates of exercise self-efficacy among older adults with a self-reported diagnosis of arthritis. Methods: This study was a secondary data analysis and used a cross-sectional design. Data was collected from a convenience sample of Non-Hispanic White and Non-Hispanic Black individuals between 2006-2008 (N=208). Descriptive statistics were run to assess means and frequencies within the sample. Bivariate statistics (Pearson and Spearman correlations, T-tests and one-way analysis of variance) were run to examine relationships between the independent and dependent variables. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine independent predictors of self-efficacy for exercise (SEE) and …

Contributors
Dhaliwal, Simran K., Der Ananian, Cheryl, Sebren, Ann, et al.
Created Date
2016

Physical activity is critical for optimal health and has emerged as a viable option to improve sleep. Moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity comparisons to improve sleep in non-exercising adults with sleep problems is limited. The purpose was to determine the effects of moderate- or vigorous-intensity exercise on sleep outcomes and peripheral skin temperature compared to a no-exercise control. The exercise intensity preference also was determined. Eleven women (46.9±7.0 years) not participating in regular exercise and self-reporting insomnia completed a graded maximal exercise test followed by a crossover trial of three randomly assigned conditions separated by a 1-week washout. Participants performed …

Contributors
Kurka, Jonathan M., Ainsworth, Barbara E, Adams, Marc A, et al.
Created Date
2016

The winter holiday period has been highlighted as a major risk period for weight gain due to excess caloric intake in the form of fat and sugar. Furthermore, diets high in fat and sugar have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exercise aids in the prevention of weight/fat gain, and prevents deleterious changes in cardiometabolic function. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a fat-sugar supplemented diet, with and without two different exercise training protocols, on body composition, glycemic control and other markers of cardiovascular disease in an at-risk population of overweight …

Contributors
Tucker, Wesley Jack, Gaesser, Glenn A, Angadi, Siddhartha S, et al.
Created Date
2016