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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2004 2019


This study uses a sequential, mixed method, action research, quantitative to qualitative research design. The purpose of this study was to develop a useful standardized hiring process at a state medical college that brings clarity to the hiring process and policies. Two conceptual frameworks guided the innovations in this study – communities of practice and Kotter’s change theory. To implement a standardized hiring process, a web-based intranet site was created through collaboration between the Academic Affairs and the Human Resources Departments of the medical college. The web-based intranet was built to be a hiring resource directed at training hiring managers …

Contributors
Drane III, Daniel, Caterino, Linda C, Ott, Molly, et al.
Created Date
2017

The impact of peer-leadership programs on undergraduate students has been studied since the inception of higher education. Programs such as peer-mentoring, peer-counseling, and peer-advising are regularly used within the college environment as there are proven benefits to both student leaders and mentees. However, there is limited content on students who plan to pursue higher education careers and experiential programs that prepare them for the field. Thus, this action research study is designed to examine the influence of a peer-advising program on participants who have identified their interest in various careers in the college setting. Employing a mixed-method approach to inquiry, …

Contributors
Hutchinson, Anika, Caterino, Linda C, Brown, Andre, et al.
Created Date
2017

Education abroad participants worldwide are often positively transformed by their experiences and, as a result, gain a great deal of knowledge, resources, ideas, and high levels of inspiration which can positively impact the individual, and local and global communities—contributing to global development. However, education abroad participants face challenges and are often not prepared for making lasting positive change in their local and global communities post-education abroad, known as the reentry phase. Moreover, they do not fully understand the potential positive impacts they can have on society as a result of their education abroad experiences. This is of significant importance for …

Contributors
Curiel, Katharine, Parmentier, Mary Jane, Henderson, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2016

It’s Not That Simple: A Complex Journey of an MFA Applied Project discusses the experience of graduate student, Molly W. Schenck. Schenck’s applied project, It’s Not That Simple, was an interdisciplinary dance theatre performance piece that challenges rape culture on college campuses. While the focus of the applied project was this performance, it was the obstacles and highlights that were related to the project that made the journey memorable. This paper will discuss the history and evolution of It’s Not That Simple, the creative process, the research, the trajectory of the project, and reflections on the journey. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Schenck, Molly Winetrout, Schupp, Karen, Kaplan, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2016

The United States is facing an unprecedented teacher shortage. With many studies estimating that 17-33% of teachers leave the profession within their first five years of starting a career, something needs to change to keep new teachers in the classroom. This study evaluates the effectiveness of peer observation as a learning tool to supplement the training of preservice teachers on an elementary campus. Observational learning theory and adult learning theory created the lens through which peer observations were implemented and evaluated in this study. Specifically, this study aimed to answer the following research questions: (a) How do conversations about teaching …

Contributors
Schenk, Matthew David, Bertrand, Melanie, Buss, Ray R, et al.
Created Date
2016

The goal of higher education institutions is to provide access to quality education along with adequate support so students can achieve personal and academic success. At the same time, institutions are increasingly responsible for ensuring a safe and inclusive learning environment. To support this, universities respond to allegations of violations of the student code of conduct through a variety of conduct models. The use of restorative practices, an approach of responding to criminal or judicial violations with an emphasis on repairing relationships and reintegration into the community, has been implemented into existing university student conduct models across the nation with …

Contributors
Mahnke, Carla Marie, Bertrand, Melanie, Mathur, Sarup, et al.
Created Date
2016

Focus has turned to the experiences of new transfer students in four-year institutions partially because of the mandate from President Obama for there to be more college graduates. Though transfer students are familiar with being college students, they still may not be accustomed to their new four-year institutions. At the time of this action research study, there were a very limited number of events to welcome new transfer students to the Arizona State University (ASU) Tempe campus. The purpose of this study was to create knowledge about the transition process of new transfer students to the Tempe campus. I worked …

Contributors
Bennett, Sarah L., Marley, Scott C, Hesse, Maria L, et al.
Created Date
2016

ABSTRACT Historically, first-generation college students (FGCS), students whose parents have not attended college nor earned a degree, are more likely to have lower college retention rates and are less likely to complete their academic programs in a timely manner. Despite this, there are many FGCS who do succeed and it is imperative to learn what fuels their success. The theoretical perspectives that framed this study included: hidden curricula, resiliency theory and community cultural wealth. Drawing from these perspectives, this qualitative research study consisted of a 10-week photo-elicitation facilitation and reflection group in which participants identified aspects of the hidden curricula …

Contributors
Romasanta, Lindsay Rae, Liou, Daniel D., Margolis, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2016

Over 150 years since the abolition of slavery, African Americans still lack equal access to education and other quality of life markers. However, a slow increase in African American students pursuing and obtaining higher education demonstrates the progress of African American academic success. Although still not at an equitable level, this progress, and the voices of success are often muted by the majoritarian narrative of African American student failure. This research focuses on African American student success and examines the specific socio-cultural characteristics and processes that shape the ways in which African American students develop their own counter-narratives to persist …

Contributors
Freeman, Stacey Vicario, Kozleski, Elizabeth, Fischman, Gustavo, et al.
Created Date
2016

This research investigates the experiences of Chinese heritage language learners (CHLLs) in a federally funded program of Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language in the United States. Most pertinent studies on Chinese heritage language education focus on stakeholders such as teachers and parents. Instead, this study explores the agency of heritage language learners in their efforts toward heritage language maintenance. Adopting a three-pronged conceptual framework of language planning and policy as a sociocultural process, language ideology, and language identity, this study applies an ethnographically-informed qualitative approach to understanding how CHLLs develop and exercise implicit language policies—taken-for-granted norms about language that …

Contributors
Chen, Ran, McCarty, Teresa L, Wiley, Terrence, et al.
Created Date
2016