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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


One type of assistive device for the blind has attempted to convert visual information into information that can be perceived through another sense, such as touch or hearing. A vibrotactile haptic display assistive device consists of an array of vibrating elements placed against the skin, allowing the blind individual to receive visual information through touch. However, these approaches have two significant technical challenges: large vibration element size and the number of microcontroller pins required for vibration control, both causing excessively low resolution of the device. Here, I propose and investigate a type of high-resolution vibrotactile haptic display which overcomes these …

Contributors
Wi, Daehan, Sodemann, Angela A, Redkar, Sangram, et al.
Created Date
2019

In this research, a new cutting edge wear estimator for micro-endmilling is developed and the reliabillity of the estimator is evaluated. The main concept of this estimator is the minimum chip thickness effect. This estimator predicts the cutting edge radius by detecting the drop in the chip production rate as the cutting edge of a micro- endmill slips over the workpiece when the minimum chip thickness becomes larger than the uncut chip thickness, thus transitioning from the shearing to the ploughing dominant regime. The chip production rate is investigated through simulation and experiment. The simulation and the experiment show that …

Contributors
LEE, JUE-HYUN, Sodemann, Angela A, Shuaib, Abdelrahman, et al.
Created Date
2019

The demand for miniaturized components with feature sizes as small as tens of microns and tolerances as small as 0.1 microns is on the rise in the fields of aerospace, electronics, optics and biomedical engineering. Micromilling has proven to be a process capable of generating the required accuracy for these features and is an alternative to various non-mechanical micro-manufacturing processes which are limited in terms of cost and productivity, especially at the micro-meso scale. The micromilling process is on the surface, a miniaturized version of conventional milling, hence inheriting its benefits. However, the reduction in scale by a few magnitudes …

Contributors
Bajaj, Anuj Kishorkumar, Sodemann, Angela A, Bekki, Jeniffer, et al.
Created Date
2015