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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
Date Range
2004 2020


Historically, colonizers, immigrants, and enslaved Africans served as carriers of Islamic culture to Puerto Rico, and today, that Islamic element is often unassumingly intertwined with the Puerto Rican culture. Using Bourdieu's concept of habitus as the framework, this dissertation engages customs and mannerisms of Puerto Ricans to reveal the imprint and legacy of Muslim Spain and the Islamic heritage of West Africa in Puerto Rico. It makes a study of the Spanish language to include vocabulary, proverbs, songs, and games that carry vestiges of Arabic language and culture. Most importantly, it also addresses an inherited religious and cultural tradition rooted …

Contributors
Saez, Lourdes Enid, Gallab, Abdullahi, Moore, Moses, et al.
Created Date
2017

This dissertation theorizes Bad Faith Rhetorics, or, rhetorical gestures that work to derail, block, or otherwise stymy knowledge-building efforts. This work explores the ways that interventions against existing social hierarchies (i.e., feminist and antiracist interventions) build knowledge (that is, are epistemologically active), and the ways that bad faith rhetorics derail such interventions. This dissertation demonstrates how bad faith rhetorics function to defend the status quo, with its social stratification by race, gender, class, and other intersectional axes of identity. Bad faith argumentative maneuvers are abundant in online environments. Consequently, this dissertation offers two case studies of the comment sections of …

Contributors
Fulton-Babicke, Holly Lynn, Goggin, Maureen, Miller, Keith, et al.
Created Date
2019

Situated within seminal debates on the questions of liberation and justice viewed from the postcolonial context, this dissertation evaluates freedom narratives from both sides of the colonial divide during the period of high imperialism. Creating a transnational grouping of three diverse historical figures, E. M. Forster, M. K. Gandhi, and James Joyce, I argue for similarities in these writers’ narrative construction of “freedom” against colonial modernity. I argue that despite these writers’ widely disparate historical and cultural determinations, which uniquely particularize each of their freedom formulas as well as freedom “ideals” – the ideal of culture for Forster, renunciation for …

Contributors
Mehta, Bina, Bivona, Daniel, Codell, Julie, et al.
Created Date
2017

According to the World Health Organization, cancer is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Although early diagnostics using biomarkers and improved treatments with targeted therapy have reduced the rate of cancer related mortalities, there remain many unknowns regarding the contributions of the tumor microenvironment to cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. The tumor microenvironment plays a significant role by manipulating the progression of cancer cells through biochemical and biophysical signals from the surrounding stromal cells along with the extracellular matrix. As such, there is a critical need to understand how the tumor microenvironment influences the molecular mechanisms …

Contributors
Truong, Danh, Nikkhah, Mehdi, LaBaer, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2018

The aim of this research study is to develop a passive architectural design morphology, tuned to the Sonoran Desert, which redefines Desert Modernism and integrates: (a) mitigation of heat transfer through the exterior envelope, and (b) use of daylight to inform appropriate architectural massing. The research investigation was delimited to mid-nineteenth century European modernist examples, and ends with mid-twentieth century modern architecture in the southwestern United States as viewed through the lens of environmental design. The specific focus was on Desert Modernism, a quasi-architectural movement, which purportedly had its beginnings in 1923 with the Coachella Valley, Popinoe Desert Cabin. A …

Contributors
Soltero, Ed, Zygas, Kestutis, Bryan, Harvey, et al.
Created Date
2019

Despite the fact that machine learning supports the development of computer vision applications by shortening the development cycle, finding a general learning algorithm that solves a wide range of applications is still bounded by the ”no free lunch theorem”. The search for the right algorithm to solve a specific problem is driven by the problem itself, the data availability and many other requirements. Automated visual inspection (AVI) systems represent a major part of these challenging computer vision applications. They are gaining growing interest in the manufacturing industry to detect defective products and keep these from reaching customers. The process of …

Contributors
Haddad, Bashar Muneer, Karam, Lina, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Cancer is a serious health concern. Current treatments are limited due to certain subpopulations of cancer cells being resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. These subpopulations have been qualitatively identified but much work remains to quantify the abnormalities they exhibit such as irregular nuclear shape. This dissertation seeks to determine physical science methods which can identify and quantify the biological characteristics of cancer and non-cancer cells. For the first project, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and chromatin of cancer and non-cancer esophageal cells were quantified using spectrophotometry and atomic force microscopy. Then the cellular nucleus shape, chromocenters, nucleoli, and nuclear speckles were …

Contributors
ARIYASINGHE, NETHMI KANCHANA, Ros, Robert, Arizona State University
Created Date
2019

As immigrants in the United States, Chinese small business entrepreneurs often encountered social and cultural barriers in the areas of finance, language, and employment in their new environment. This dissertation investigated how they utilized social capital to surmount the embedded disadvantages of an unequal market in their adopted country. The findings presented in this qualitative descriptive multi-case analysis, conducted in the greater metropolitan regions of Phoenix and Los Angeles, demonstrated the importance of social and transnational ties created in the United States within the local Chinese community as well as their social connections brought from China. Drawing upon the data …

Contributors
Kwoh, Jing Yu Xin Yu Xiao, Jurik, Nancy, Li, Wei, et al.
Created Date
2019

Over 35% of multiracial college students fail to earn a degree, which can have significant economic and health costs over their lifespan. This study aimed to better understand college and psychological adjustment among multiracial college students of Hispanic/Latinx and White non-Hispanic descent by examining students’ racial identities and use of resilience resources. Latent profiles of identity were identified to better understand how different aspects of racial identity are clustered in this population. Multiracial college students (N=221) reported on racial identity as measured on multiple dimensions: Hispanic/Latinx identity, Hispanic/Latinx cultural orientation, White identity, identity integration, shifting expressions of identity, and identity …

Contributors
Jewell, Shannon, Luecken, Linda J, Jackson, Kelly, et al.
Created Date
2020

This dissertation will cover two topics. For the first, let $K$ be a number field. A $K$-derived polynomial $f(x) \in K[x]$ is a polynomial that factors into linear factors over $K$, as do all of its derivatives. Such a polynomial is said to be {\it proper} if its roots are distinct. An unresolved question in the literature is whether or not there exists a proper $\Q$-derived polynomial of degree 4. Some examples are known of proper $K$-derived quartics for a quadratic number field $K$, although other than $\Q(\sqrt{3})$, these fields have quite large discriminant. (The second known field is $\Q(\sqrt{3441})$.) …

Contributors
Carrillo, Benjamin, Jones, John, Bremner, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2019