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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Status
  • Public
Date Range
2011 2019


Authenticity is a familiar concept in popular culture. Despite its popularity, few studies have empirically examined the construct of authenticity. In this study, the Authenticity Scale and Authenticity Inventory, two recently created scales measuring dispositional authenticity, were examined to determine how they compare to one another as well as how they related to theoretically relevant measures including well-being and career indecision. Results from 576 undergraduate students supported the factor structure of the Authenticity Scale, but empirical support for the Authenticity Inventory was not found. Findings indicated that the Authenticity Scale was strongly related to well-being and moderately correlated with career …

Contributors
White, Nathan, Tracey, Terence, Kinnier, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2011

Broaden and build theory (BBT; Fredrickson, 1998; 2001) postulates that positive emotions expand the scope of one's attention and thought-action repertoires (Fredrickson & Branigan, 2005). Within the boundaries of BBT, the undoing hypothesis (Fredrickson, 1998, Fredrickson & Levenson, 1998) argues that positive emotions themselves do not bring forth specific action tendencies or urges; therefore, they do not consequently require an increase in cardiovascular activity to carry out the urge. On the other hand, positive emotions have evolved to subdue the cardiovascular response previously initiated by negative emotions. This dissertation proposes that the real power of positive emotions might be to …

Contributors
Deiss Jr, Douglas Martin, Floyd, Kory, Mongeau, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2012

Investigation of measurement invariance (MI) commonly assumes correct specification of dimensionality across multiple groups. Although research shows that violation of the dimensionality assumption can cause bias in model parameter estimation for single-group analyses, little research on this issue has been conducted for multiple-group analyses. This study explored the effects of mismatch in dimensionality between data and analysis models with multiple-group analyses at the population and sample levels. Datasets were generated using a bifactor model with different factor structures and were analyzed with bifactor and single-factor models to assess misspecification effects on assessments of MI and latent mean differences. As baseline …

Contributors
Xu, Yuning, Green, Samuel, Levy, Roy, et al.
Created Date
2018

Institutions of higher education often tout that they are developing students to become lifelong learners. Evaluative efforts in this area have been presumably hindered by the lack of a uniform conceptualization of lifelong learning. Lifelong learning has been defined from institutional, economic, socio-cultural, and pedagogical perspectives, among others. This study presents the existing operational definitions and theories of lifelong learning in the context of higher education and synthesizes them to propose a unified model of college students' orientation toward lifelong learning. The model theorizes that orientation toward lifelong learning is a latent construct which manifests as students' likelihood to engage …

Contributors
Arcuria, Phil, Thompson, Marilyn, Green, Samuel, et al.
Created Date
2011

ABSTRACT This study investigated the possibility of item parameter drift (IPD) in a calculus placement examination administered to approximately 3,000 students at a large university in the United States. A single form of the exam was administered continuously for a period of two years, possibly allowing later examinees to have prior knowledge of specific items on the exam. An analysis of IPD was conducted to explore evidence of possible item exposure. Two assumptions concerning items exposure were made: 1) item recall and item exposure are positively correlated, and 2) item exposure results in the items becoming easier over time. Special …

Contributors
Krause, Janet L., Levy, Roy, Thompson, Marilyn, et al.
Created Date
2012

The measurement of competency in nursing is critical to ensure safe and effective care of patients. This study had two purposes. First, the psychometric characteristics of the Nursing Performance Profile (NPP), an instrument used to measure nursing competency, were evaluated using generalizability theory and a sample of 18 nurses in the Measuring Competency with Simulation (MCWS) Phase I dataset. The relative magnitudes of various error sources and their interactions were estimated in a generalizability study involving a fully crossed, three-facet random design with nurse participants as the object of measurement and scenarios, raters, and items as the three facets. A …

Contributors
O'Brien, Janet Elaine, Thompson, Marilyn, Hagler, Debra, et al.
Created Date
2014

Instrumentality is an important motivational construct that empathizes the connection between a present task and a future goal. Instrumentality is conceptualized as a task-specific variable. Reflecting context-dependent characteristics, two different types of instrumentality are distinguished: endogenous and exogenous instrumentality. Endogenous instrumentality is the perception that learning in a present task is useful to achieving valued future goals and exogenous instrumentality is the perception that outcome in a present task is instrumental to achieving valued future goals. This study investigated the differential relationships among each instrumentality type, academic achievements, and motivational variables. Three studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between …

Contributors
Kim, Wonsik, Husman, Jenefer, Thompson, Marilyn, et al.
Created Date
2016

Epilepsy is a chronic illness impacting the lives of over 300,000 children nationally. Sexson and Madan-Swain offer a theory that addresses successful school reentry in children that are chronically ill. Their theory posits that successful school reentry is influenced by school personnel with appropriate attitudes, training experiences, and by factors relating to the child's illness. The parents of 74 students, between second and twelfth grades, completed a questionnaire addressing their child's epilepsy and their current level of seizure control. Each child's homeroom teacher also completed a survey regarding their training experiences about epilepsy and their attitudes towards individuals with epilepsy. …

Contributors
Bohac, Genevieve Elizabeth, Wodrich, David L, Lavoie, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2011

This study aimed to understand the factors that influence Chinese American older adults’ advance care planning (ACP) on end-of-life care. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Belief Model (HBM) were primarily applied to explain Chinese American older adults’ intentions toward two behaviors: 1) discussion of end-of-life care plans with family members and 2) completion of an advance directive (AD). Additionally, acculturation and family cohesion were considered to examine their impacts on the TPB and HBM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interviews on a sample of 298 community-dwelling Chinese-American adults aged 55 and older living in the …

Contributors
Liu, Yanqin, Roberto, Anthony J., Mongeau, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2018

Rapidly growing research on mothers’ perinatal depression, has demonstrated significant links among mothers’ depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the first year postpartum, their parenting, and multiple aspects of children’s development. This prospective longitudinal study contributes to research on mothers’ perinatal depression by examining the mechanisms by which maternal perinatal depression is associated with children’s adjustment early in development in a sample of 204 Mexican-origin adolescent mothers (Mage at Wave 1 = 16.80, SD = 1.0) and their children (58% boys). I expected that adolescent mothers’ negative parenting behaviors would mediate the associations between mothers’ perinatal depressive symptoms and three child …

Contributors
Seay, Danielle Marie, Elam, Kit, Iida, Masumi, et al.
Created Date
2019