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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Status
  • Public
Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


In the upcoming decade, powerful new astronomical facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and ground-based 30-meter telescopes will open up the epoch of reionization to direct astronomical observation. One of the primary tools used to understand the bulk astrophysical properties of the high-redshift universe are empirically-derived star-forming laws, which relate observed luminosity to fundamental astrophysical quantities such as star formation rate. The radio/infrared relation is one of the more mysterious of these relations: despite its somewhat uncertain astrophysical origins, this relation is extremely tight and linear, with 0.3 dex of scatter over …

Contributors
Monkiewicz, Jacqueline, Bowman, Judd, Scowen, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2019

Part I – I analyze a database of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of collisions between planetary bodies and use the data to define semi-empirical models that reproduce remant masses. These models may be leveraged when detailed, time-dependent aspects of the collision are not paramount, but analytical intuition or a rapid solution is required, e.g. in ‘N-body simulations’. I find that the stratification of the planet is a non-negligible control on accretion efficiency. I also show that the absolute scale (total mass) of the collision may affect the accretion efficiency, with larger bodies more efficiently disrupting, as a function of …

Contributors
Gabriel, Travis Saint James, Asphaug, Erik I, Hardgrove, Craig, et al.
Created Date
2019

Several key, open questions in astrophysics can be tackled by searching for and mining large datasets for transient phenomena. The evolution of massive stars and compact objects can be studied over cosmic time by identifying supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in other galaxies and determining their redshifts. Modeling GRBs and their afterglows to probe the jets of GRBs can shed light on the emission mechanism, rate, and energetics of these events. In Chapter 1, I discuss the current state of astronomical transient study, including sources of interest, instrumentation, and data reduction techniques, with a focus on work in the …

Contributors
Strausbaugh, Robert, Butler, Nathaniel, Jansen, Rolf, et al.
Created Date
2019

One strategic objective of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to find life on distant worlds. Current and future missions either space telescopes or Earth-based observatories are frequently used to collect information through the detection of photons from exoplanet atmospheres. The primary challenge is to fully understand the nature of these exo-atmospheres. To this end, atmospheric modeling and sophisticated data analysis techniques are playing a key role in understanding the emission and transmission spectra of exoplanet atmospheres. Of critical importance to the interpretation of such data are the opacities (or absorption cross-sections) of key molecules and atoms. During …

Contributors
Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan, Line, Michael R., Lyons, James R., et al.
Created Date
2019

This dissertation details the development of an open source, frequency domain multiplexed (FDM) readout for large-format arrays of superconducting lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The system architecture is designed to meet the requirements of current and next generation balloon-borne and ground-based submillimeter (sub-mm), far-infrared (FIR) and millimeter-wave (mm-wave) astronomical cameras, whose science goals will soon drive the pixel counts of sub-mm detector arrays from the kilopixel to the megapixel regime. The in-flight performance of the readout system was verified during the summer, 2018 flight of ASI's OLIMPO balloon-borne telescope, from Svalbard, Norway. This was the first flight for both LEKID …

Contributors
Gordon, Samuel, Mauskopf, Philip, Groppi, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2019

Learning how properties of galaxies such as star formation, galaxy interactions, chemical composition, and others evolve to produce the modern universe has long been a goal of extragalactic astronomy. In recent years, grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided a means to study these properties with spectroscopy while avoiding the limitations of ground-based observation. In this dissertation, I present several studies wherein I used HST G102 grism spectroscopy from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) to investigate these fundamental properties of galaxies and how they interact and evolve. In the first study, I combined the grism spectra …

Contributors
Pharo, John, Malhotra, Sangeeta, Young, Patrick, et al.
Created Date
2019

One of the most fundamental questions in astronomy is how the Universe evolved to become the highly structured system of stars and galaxies that we see today. The answer to this question can be largely uncovered in a relatively unexplored period in the history of the Universe known as the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), where radiation from the first generation of stars and galaxies ionized the neutral hydrogen gas in the intergalactic medium. The reionization process created "bubbles" of ionized regions around radiating sources that perturbed the matter density distribution and influenced the subsequent formation of stars and galaxies. Exactly …

Contributors
Kittiwisit, Piyanat, Bowman, Judd D., Groppi, Christopher E., et al.
Created Date
2019

The composition of planets and their volatile contents are intimately connected to the structure and evolution of their parent protoplanetary disks. The transport of momentum and volatiles is often parameterized by a turbulent viscosity parameter $\alpha$, which is usually assumed to be spatially and temporally uniform across the disk. I show that variable $\alpha$(r,z) (where $r$ is radius, and $z$ is height from the midplane) attributable to angular momentum transport due to MRI can yield disks with significantly different structure, as mass piles up in the 1-10 AU region resulting in steep slopes of p $>$ 2 here (where p …

Contributors
Kalyaan, Anusha, Desch, Steven J, Groppi, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2018

This thesis contains an overview, as well as the history of optical interferometers. A new approach to interferometric measurements of stars is proposed and explored. Modern updates to the classic techniques are described along with some theoretical derivations showing why the method of single photon counting shows significant promise relative to the currently used amplitude interferometry. Description of a modular intensity interferometer system using commercially available single-photon detectors is given. Calculations on the sensitivity and \emph{uv}-plane coverage using these modules mounted on existing telescopes on Kitt Peak, Arizona is presented. Determining fundamental stellar properties is essential for testing models of …

Contributors
Pilyavsky, Genady, Mauskopf, Philip, Groppi, Christopher, et al.
Created Date
2018

The pace of exoplanet discoveries has rapidly accelerated in the past few decades and the number of planets with measured mass and radius is expected to pick up in the coming years. Many more planets with a size similar to earth are expected to be found. Currently, software for characterizing rocky planet interiors is lacking. There is no doubt that a planet’s interior plays a key role in determining surface conditions including atmosphere composition and land area. Comparing data with diagrams of mass vs. radius for terrestrial planets provides only a first-order estimate of the internal structure and composition of …

Contributors
Lorenzo Jr., Alejandro Miguel, Desch, Steven, Shim, Dan S.-H., et al.
Created Date
2018