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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Status
  • Public
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to determine the energy cost of four modes of resistance training (push-ups, pull-ups, curl-ups, lunges). Twelve well trained men aged 23.6 (SD=2.84) years were recruited to participate in the study. Each of the 12 men completed three trials of each of the four exercises on one visit to the laboratory lasting slightly over one hour (M=72 min, SD=5.9 min). The oxygen consumption of the men was monitored constantly throughout the trial and data was recorded every five seconds. Mean VO2 values were calculated for each exercise. The values for push-ups (M=11.57 ml/kg/min, SD=1.99), …

Contributors
Vezina, Jesse, Ainsworth, Barbara, Campbell, Kathryn, et al.
Created Date
2011

The elaborate signals of animals are often costly to produce and maintain, thus communicating reliable information about the quality of an individual to potential mates or competitors. The properties of the sensory systems that receive signals can drive the evolution of these signals and shape their form and function. However, relatively little is known about the ecological and physiological constraints that may influence the development and maintenance of sensory systems. In the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) and many other bird species, carotenoid pigments are used to create colorful sexually selected displays, and their expression is limited by health and dietary …

Contributors
Toomey, Matthew B, Mcgraw, Kevin J, Deviche, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2011

One hypothesis for the small size of insects relative to vertebrates, and the existence of giant fossil insects, is that atmospheric oxygen levels have constrained body sizes because oxygen delivery would be unable to match the needs of metabolically active tissues in larger insects. This study tested whether oxygen delivery becomes more challenging for larger insects by measuring the oxygen-sensitivity of flight metabolic rates and behavior during hovering for 11 different species of dragonflies that range in mass by an order of magnitude. Animals were flown in 7 different oxygen concentrations ranging from 30% to 2.5% to assess the sensitivity …

Contributors
Henry, Joanna Randyl, Harrison, Jon F, Kaiser, Alexander, et al.
Created Date
2011

Like individual organisms, complex social groups are able to maintain predictable trajectories of growth, from initial colony foundation to mature reproductively capable units. They do so while simultaneously responding flexibly to variation in nutrient availability and intake. Leafcutter ant colonies function as tri-trophic systems, in which the ants harvest vegetation to grow a fungus that, in turn, serves as food for the colony. Fungal growth rates and colony worker production are interdependent, regulated by nutritional and behavioral feedbacks. Fungal growth and quality are directly affected by worker foraging decisions, while worker production is, in turn, dependent on the amount and …

Contributors
Clark, Rebecca M., Fewell, Jennifer H, Mueller, Ulrich, et al.
Created Date
2011

Conditions during development can shape the expression of traits at adulthood, a phenomenon called developmental plasticity. In this context, factors such as nutrition or health state during development can affect current and subsequent physiology, body size, brain structure, ornamentation, and behavior. However, many of the links between developmental and adult phenotype are poorly understood. I performed a series of experiments using a common molecular currency - carotenoid pigments - to track somatic and reproductive investments through development and into adulthood. Carotenoids are red, orange, or yellow pigments that: (a) animals must acquire from their diets, (b) can be physiologically beneficial, …

Contributors
Butler, Michael William, Mcgraw, Kevin J, Chang, Yung, et al.
Created Date
2012

Extremely thick cranial vaults have been noted as a diagnostic characteristic of Homo erectus since the first fossil of the species was identified, but potential mechanisms underlying this seemingly unique trait have not been rigorously investigated. Cranial vault thickness (CVT) is not a monolithic trait, and the responsiveness of its layers to environmental stimuli is unknown. Identifying factors that affect CVT would be exceedingly valuable in teasing apart potential contributors to thick vaults in the Pleistocene. Four hypotheses were tested using CT scans of skulls of more than 1100 human and non-human primates. Data on total frontal, parietal, and occipital …

Contributors
Copes, Lynn Erin, Kimbel, William H, Schwartz, Gary T, et al.
Created Date
2012

Land management practices such as domestic animal grazing can alter plant communities via changes in soil structure and chemistry, species composition, and plant nutrient content. These changes can affect the abundance and quality of plants consumed by insect herbivores with consequent changes in population dynamics. These population changes can translate to massive crop damage and pest control costs. My dissertation focused on Oedaleus asiaticus, a dominant Asian locust, and had three main objectives. First, I identified morphological, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the migratory ("brown") and non-migratory ("green") phenotypes. I found that brown morphs had longer wings, larger thoraxes and …

Contributors
Cease, Arianne, Harrison, Jon, Elser, James, et al.
Created Date
2012

While exercising mammalian muscle increasingly relies on carbohydrates for fuel as aerobic exercise intensity rises above the moderate range, flying birds are extraordinary endurance athletes and fuel flight, a moderate-high intensity exercise, almost exclusively with lipid. In addition, Aves have long lifespans compared to weight-matched mammals. As skeletal muscle mitochondria account for the majority of oxygen consumption during aerobic exercise, the primary goal was to investigate differences in isolated muscle mitochondria between these species and to examine to what extent factors intrinsic to mitochondria may account for the behavior observed in the intact tissue and whole organism. First, maximal enzyme …

Contributors
Kuzmiak, Sarah, Willis, Wayne T, Mandarino, Lawrence, et al.
Created Date
2012

Birds have plasma glucose levels that are 1.5-2 times greater than mammals of similar body mass in addition to higher free fatty acid concentrations, both of which would typically impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation if observed in mammals. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be stimulated in mammals through the use of acetylcholine (ACh), which primarily acts through nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated pathways, with varying reliance on endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs). Very few studies have been conducted on small resistance systemic arteries from birds. The hypothesis was that because birds have naturally high glucose and free fatty acid concentrations, ACh-induced vasodilation of isolated …

Contributors
Jarrett, Catherine Lee, Sweazea, Karen L, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2012

Fixed-pointer moving-scale tape displays are a compact way to present wide range dynamic data, and are commonly employed in aircraft and spacecraft to display the primary parameters of airspeed, altitude and heading. A limitation of the moving tape format is its inability to natively display off scale target, reference or 'bug' values. The hypothesis tested was that a non-linear fisheye presentation (made possible by modern display technology) would maintain the essential functionality and compactness of existing moving tape displays while increasing situational awareness by ecologically displaying a wider set of reference values. Experimentation showed that the speed and accuracy of …

Contributors
English, Dave, Branaghan, Russell J, Cooke, Nancy J, et al.
Created Date
2012

Parental care provides many benefits to offspring. One widely realized benefit is enhanced regulation of offspring's thermal environment. The developmental thermal environment during development can be optimized behaviorally through nest site selection and brooding, and it can be further enhanced by physiological heat production. In fact, enhancement of the developmental thermal environment has been proposed as the initial driving force for the evolution of endothermy in bird and mammals. I used pythons (Squamata: Pythonidae) to expand existing knowledge of behavioral and physiological parental tactics used to regulate offspring thermal environment. I first demonstrated that brooding behavior in the Children's python …

Contributors
Brashears, Jake Alexander, Denardo, Dale, Harrison, Jon, et al.
Created Date
2012

Broaden and build theory (BBT; Fredrickson, 1998; 2001) postulates that positive emotions expand the scope of one's attention and thought-action repertoires (Fredrickson & Branigan, 2005). Within the boundaries of BBT, the undoing hypothesis (Fredrickson, 1998, Fredrickson & Levenson, 1998) argues that positive emotions themselves do not bring forth specific action tendencies or urges; therefore, they do not consequently require an increase in cardiovascular activity to carry out the urge. On the other hand, positive emotions have evolved to subdue the cardiovascular response previously initiated by negative emotions. This dissertation proposes that the real power of positive emotions might be to …

Contributors
Deiss Jr, Douglas Martin, Floyd, Kory, Mongeau, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2012

In social insect colonies, as with individual animals, the rates of biological processes scale with body size. The remarkable explanatory power of metabolic allometry in ecology and evolutionary biology derives from the great diversity of life exhibiting a nonlinear scaling pattern in which metabolic rates are not proportional to mass, but rather exhibit a hypometric relationship with body size. While one theory suggests that the supply of energy is a major physiological constraint, an alternative theory is that the demand for energy is regulated by behavior. The central hypothesis of this dissertation research is that increases in colony size reduce …

Contributors
Waters, James Stephen, Harrison, Jon F, Quinlan, Michael C., et al.
Created Date
2012

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of two novel intermittent exercise prescriptions on glucose regulation and ambulatory blood pressure. Methods: Ten subjects (5 men and 5 women, ages 31.5 ± 5.42 yr, height 170.38 ± 9.69 cm and weight 88.59 ± 18.91 kg) participated in this four-treatment crossover trial. All subjects participated in four trials, each taking place over three days. On the evening of the first day, subjects were fitted with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). On the second day, subjects were fitted with an ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABP) and underwent one …

Contributors
Bhammar, Dharini Mukeshkumar, Gaesser, Glenn A, Shaibi, Gabriel, et al.
Created Date
2013

In recent years, machine learning and data mining technologies have received growing attention in several areas such as recommendation systems, natural language processing, speech and handwriting recognition, image processing and biomedical domain. Many of these applications which deal with physiological and biomedical data require person specific or person adaptive systems. The greatest challenge in developing such systems is the subject-dependent data variations or subject-based variability in physiological and biomedical data, which leads to difference in data distributions making the task of modeling these data, using traditional machine learning algorithms, complex and challenging. As a result, despite the wide application of …

Contributors
Chattopadhyay, Rita, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Ye, Jieping, et al.
Created Date
2013

Our eyes never stop moving, even during attempted gaze fixation. Fixational eye movements, which include tremor, drift, and microsaccades, are necessary to prevent retinal image adaptation, but may also result in unstable vision. Fortunately, the nervous system can suppress the retinal displacements induced by fixational eye movements and consequently keep our vision stable. The neural correlates of perceptual suppression during fixational eye movements are controversial. Also, the contribution of retinal versus extraretinal inputs to microsaccade-induced neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex (i.e. area V1) remain unclear. Here I show that V1 neuronal responses to microsaccades are different from those …

Contributors
Najafian Jazi, Ali, Buneo, Christopher, Martinez-Conde, Susana, et al.
Created Date
2013

This dissertation investigates the condition of skeletal muscle insulin resistance using bioinformatics and computational biology approaches. Drawing from several studies and numerous data sources, I have attempted to uncover molecular mechanisms at multiple levels. From the detailed atomistic simulations of a single protein, to datamining approaches applied at the systems biology level, I provide new targets to explore for the research community. Furthermore I present a new online web resource that unifies various bioinformatics databases to enable discovery of relevant features in 3D protein structures. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Mielke, Clinton, Mandarino, Lawrence, Labaer, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2013

Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 7.3% of Americans, leading to debilitating and life-threatening comorbidities. Estrogen and testosterone levels have been linked to inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, as well as glucose and insulin concentrations. The present study was designed to determine the link between sex differences, glucose control, and inflammation and oxidative stress related to daily almond ingestion among subjects with type 2 diabetes. Subjects were randomized to an intervention group, which received 1.5 oz. almonds daily for 12 weeks, or to the matched control group, which maintained their current diet. No significant differences were found in changes in glucose …

Contributors
Petersen, Katherine Nicole, Karen, Sweazea, Carol, Johnston, et al.
Created Date
2014

Foraging has complex effects on whole-organism homeostasis, and there is considerable evidence that foraging behavior is influenced by both environmental factors (e.g., food availability, predation risk) and the physiological condition of an organism. The optimization of foraging behavior to balance costs and benefits is termed state-dependent foraging (SDF) while behavior that seeks to protect assets of fitness is termed the asset protection principle (APP). A majority of studies examining SDF have focused on the role that energy balance has on the foraging of organisms with high metabolism and high energy demands ("high-energy systems" such as endotherms). In contrast, limited work …

Contributors
Wright, Christian D., Denardo, Dale F., Harrison, Jon, et al.
Created Date
2014

In adults, consuming a high-fat meal can induce endothelial dysfunction while exercise may mitigate postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Whether exercise is protective against postprandial endothelial dysfunction in obese youth is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) performed the evening prior to a high-fat meal protects against postprandial endothelial dysfunction in obese adolescent males. Fourteen obese adolescent males (BMI%tile=98.5±0.6; 14.3±1.0yrs) completed the study. After initial screening, participants arrived, fasted at 9:00 in the morning where brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using duplex ultrasound after 20min of supine rest (7.0±3.0%) and completed a …

Contributors
Ryder, Justin R., Shaibi, Gabriel Q, Gaesser, Glenn A, et al.
Created Date
2014

ABSTRACT The hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and energy balance, while nitric oxide (NO) produced in the blood vessels is beneficial for preventing disease-induced impaired vasodilation and hypertension. Elevations in the free radical superoxide can result in impaired vasodilation through scavenging of NO. Omega 3 is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is beneficial at reducing body weight and in lowering many cardiovascular risk factors like atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to examine the change in plasma concentrations of leptin, nitric oxide, and the antioxidant superoxide dismutase in addition to examining the association between leptin and …

Contributors
Alanbagy, Samer, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2014

The omega-3 fatty acids in fatty fish and fish oil, eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), have been associated with a reduction in risk for cardiovascular disease. Blood type is a known contributor to risk for cardiovascular events. This study evaluated the effect of fish oil supplements on cardiovascular risk markers in adults with blood types A or O. An 8-week parallel-arm, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted in healthy adult men and women with either blood type A (BTA) or blood type O (BTO). Participants were randomized to receive fish oil supplements (n=10 [3 BTA/7 BTO]; 2 g [containing …

Contributors
Herring, Dana, Johnston, Carol, Vega-López, Sonia, et al.
Created Date
2014

Following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) 5-50% of patients will develop post traumatic epilepsy (PTE). Pediatric patients are most susceptible with the highest incidence of PTE. Currently, we cannot prevent the development of PTE and knowledge of basic mechanisms are unknown. This has led to several shortcomings to the treatment of PTE, one of which is the use of anticonvulsant medication to the population of TBI patients that are not likely to develop PTE. The complication of identifying the two populations has been hindered by the ability to find a marker to the pathogenesis of PTE. The central hypothesis of …

Contributors
Nichols, Joshua, Anderson, Trent, Neisewander, Janet, et al.
Created Date
2014

Cell morphology and the distribution of voltage gated ion channels play a major role in determining a neuron's firing behavior, resulting in the specific processing of spatiotemporal synaptic input patterns. Although many studies have provided insight into the computational properties arising from neuronal structure as well as from channel kinetics, no comprehensive theory exists which explains how the interaction of these features shapes neuronal excitability. In this study computational models based on the identified Drosophila motoneuron (MN) 5 are developed to investigate the role of voltage gated ion channels, the impact of their densities and the effects of structural features. …

Contributors
Berger, Sandra Daniela, Crook, Sharon, Baer, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2014

Voluntary exercise has been shown to generate post exercise improvements in executive function within the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) population. Research is limited on the link between exercise and motor function in this population. Whether or not changes in executive and motor function are observed under assisted exercise conditions is unknown. This study examined the effect of a six-week cycling intervention on executive and motor-function responses in young adult females with ADHD. Participants were randomized to either a voluntary exercise (VE) or an assisted exercise (AE) group. Both groups performed 30 minute cycling sessions, three times per week, at either …

Contributors
Birchfield, Natasha Renee, Ringenbach, Shannon, Lee, Chong, et al.
Created Date
2014

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) most frequently occurs in pediatric patients and remains a leading cause of childhood death and disability. Mild TBI (mTBI) accounts for 70-90% of all TBI cases, yet its neuropathophysiology is still poorly understood. While a single mTBI injury can lead to persistent deficits, repeat injuries increase the severity and duration of both acute symptoms and long term deficits. In this study, to model pediatric repetitive mTBI (rmTBI) we subjected unrestrained juvenile animals (post-natal day 20) to repeat weight drop impact. Animals were anesthetized and subjected to sham or rmTBI once per day for 5 days. At …

Contributors
Goddeyne, Corey Charles, Anderson, Trent, Smith, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2014

Long term high fat diets (HFD) are correlated with the development of diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short term high fat intake on the etiology of kidney disease has not been well-studied. Therefore, this study examined the impact of a six week HFD (60% fat) on kidney structure and function in young male Sprague-Dawley rats. Previous studies have shown that these animals develop indices of diabetes compared to rats fed a standard rodent chow (5% fat) for six weeks. The hypothesis of this study is that six weeks of HFD will lead to early stages of kidney …

Contributors
Crinigan, Catherine, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2015

The shape of glucose response and one hour (1-hr) glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) are emerging biomarkers for type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to investigate the utility of these novel biomakers to differentiate type 2 diabetes risk in Latino youth, and (2) to examine the genetic determinants in a Latino population. Data from the ASU Arizona Insulin Registry (AIR) registry and the USC Study of Latino Adolescents at Risk for diabetes project were used to test the cross-sectional and prospective utility of novel biomarkers to identify youth at risk for type …

Contributors
Kim, Joon Young, Shaibi, Gabriel Q, Mandarino, Lawrence J, et al.
Created Date
2015

Background: Despite the reported improvements in glucose regulation associated with flaxseeds (Linum usitatissimum) few clinical trials have been conducted in diabetic participants. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of ground flaxseed consumption at attenuating hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress as compared to a control in adults with non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes (T2D). Design: In a randomized parallel arm controlled efficacy trial, participants were asked to consume either 28 g/d ground flaxseed or the fiber-matched control (9 g/d ground psyllium husk) for 8 weeks. The study included 17 adults (9 male, 8 females; 46±14 y; BMI: 31.4±5.7 kg/m2) with a …

Contributors
Ricklefs, Kristin, Sweazea, Karen L, Johnston, Carol S, et al.
Created Date
2015

Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in children. When TBI occurs in children it often results in severe cognitive and behavioral deficits. Post-injury, the pediatric brain may be sensitive to the effects of TBI while undergoing a number of age-dependent physiological and neurobiological changes. Due to the nature of the developing cortex, it is important to understand how a pediatric brain recovers from a severe TBI (sTBI) compared to an adult. Investigating major cortical and cellular changes after sTBI in a pediatric model can elucidate why pediatrics go on to suffer more neurological …

Contributors
Nichols, Joshua, Anderson, Trent, Newbern, Jason, et al.
Created Date
2015

The unique anatomical and functional properties of vasculature determine the susceptibility of the spinal cord to ischemia. The spinal cord vascular architecture is designed to withstand major ischemic events by compensating blood supply via important anastomotic channels. One of the important compensatory channels of the arterial basket of the conus medullaris (ABCM). ABCM consists of one or two arteries arising from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) and circumferentially connecting the ASA and the posterior spinal arteries. In addition to compensatory function, the arterial basket can be involved in arteriovenous fistulae and malformations of the conus. The morphometric anatomical analysis of …

Contributors
Martirosyan, Nikolay, Preul, Mark C, Vernon, Brent, et al.
Created Date
2016

The glycation of plasma proteins leading to the production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and subsequent damage is a driving factor in the pathophysiology of diabetic complications. The overall research objective was to elucidate the mechanisms by which birds prevent protein glycation in the presence of naturally high plasma glucose concentrations. This was accomplished through the specific purpose of examining the impact of temperature and glucose concentration on the percent glycation of chicken serum albumin (CSA) in comparison to human serum albumin (HSA). Purified CSA and HSA solutions prepared at four different glucose concentrations (0 mM, 5.56 mM, 11.11 …

Contributors
Zuck, Jessica Ann, Sweazea, Karen, Johnston, Carol, et al.
Created Date
2016

PURPOSE: Lean hypertension (HTN) is characterized by a mechanistically different HTN when compared to obese HTN. The purpose of this study is to assess whether body phenotype influences blood pressure (BP) responses following both acute and chronic exercise. METHODS: Obese (body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2) and lean (BMI < 25 kg/m2) men with pre-hypertension (PHTN) (systolic BP (SBP) 120 - 139 or diastolic BP (DBP) 80 - 89 mm Hg) were asked to participate in a two-phase trial. Phase 1 assessed differences in post-exercise hypotension between groups in response to an acute exercise bout. Phase 2 consisted of …

Contributors
Zeigler, Zachary, Swan, Pamela, Gaesser, Glenn, et al.
Created Date
2016

Introduction: Weight cycling is defined as happening when an individual intentionally loses weight and then subsequently regaining the weight over time. Weight cycling has been associated with a number of adverse health consequences and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The large majority of behaviorally based weight loss interventions typically result in full weight regain often with additional weight gained over time with each repeated bout of weight cycling. Mindful eating, which is defined as a non-judgmental awareness of meal related factors, has been found to influence negative behaviors related to weight cycling. Purpose: The purpose of this study …

Contributors
Smith, Jared McDonald, Swan, Pamela, Sebren, Ann, et al.
Created Date
2016

There is considerable recent interest in the dynamic nature of immune function in the context of an animal’s internal and external environment. An important focus within this field of ecoimmunology is on how availability of resources such as energy can alter immune function. Water is an additional resource that drives animal development, physiology, and behavior, yet the influence hydration has on immunity has received limited attention. In particular, hydration state may have the greatest potential to drive fluctuations in immunity and other physiological functions in species that live in water-limited environments where they may experience periods of dehydration. To shed …

Contributors
Moeller, Karla, DeNardo, Dale, Angilletta, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2016

Why do many animals possess multiple classes of photoreceptors that vary in the wavelengths of light to which they are sensitive? Multiple spectral photoreceptor classes are a requirement for true color vision. However, animals may have unconventional vision, in which multiple spectral channels broaden the range of wavelengths that can be detected, or in which they use only a subset of receptors for specific behaviors. Branchiopod crustaceans are of interest for the study of unconventional color vision because they express multiple visual pigments in their compound eyes, have a simple repertoire of visually guided behavior, inhabit unique and highly variable …

Contributors
Lessios, Nicolas, Rutowski, Ronald L, Cohen, Jonathan H, et al.
Created Date
2016

Given the continued increase in obesity rates in the United States, there has been growing research regarding factors related to obesity. Researchers have examined biological factors, such as set point theory, as well as various psychological factors such as motivation, self-efficacy, and eating styles. Taster-type, defined as how an individual experiences the perception of taste (particularly bitterness), is a recent area of research that has explored the potential relationship between this phenomenon and obesity. The current study examined whether taster-type impacted weight loss, along with secondary measures of BMI, waist circumference, and food neophobia, as well as taster-type’s impact on …

Contributors
Wagner, Melissa C., Robinson-Kurpius, Sharon, Capaldi Phillips, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2016

Literature was reviewed about how synchrony occurs in infant-parent dyads, in emotion, and physiologically in couple dyads. Social baseline theory suggests that both conversation and interpersonal touch confer benefits by reducing burden on the participants through coregulatory processes. The current study examined how affectionate touch and positive conversation influenced physiological synchrony, a potential mechanism of physiological coregulation, in couples. Because synchrony is believed to occur within the autonomic nervous system, in the present study, physiological synchrony was measured using cardiac interbeat interval (IBI) as an indicator of autonomic nervous system activation. Couples were assigned to one of four conditions: interpersonal …

Contributors
McAfee, Ashley, Burleson, Mary, Duran, Nicholas, et al.
Created Date
2018

Background: Understanding an athlete’s workload is one way to determine the likelihood of receiving a sports injury. Workload variables are categorized as either internal load (IL) such as heart rate, or external load (EL) which include speed, distance or volume. Objective: This study investigated the correlation between IL and EL measured by micro-technology in female college soccer players. In addition, the utility of IL and EL to predict risk of soft tissue injury on lower limbs was examined. Method: 23 NCAA Division One women soccer players 19.2 ± 1.2 years old, 168.2 ± 7.3 cm, and 141.0 ± 17.9 kg …

Contributors
Ishida, Ai, Swan, Pamela, Beaumont, Joshua, et al.
Created Date
2018

Obesity prevalence is high in the United States, in part due to increased fat storage following consumption of high fat/carbohydrate (sugar) foods. Following a meal, carbohydrate stimulates its own oxidation, while simultaneously suppressing fat oxidation, ultimately leading to fat storage. Aerobic exercise preceding a meal increases fat oxidation in the postprandial period, which may reduce fat storage. The ideal exercise prescription for optimal postprandial fat oxidation is unknown. The effect of low and moderate intensity continuous exercise (MIE) has been studied extensively, while the effects of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on post-prandial substrate oxidation has not been examined. The purpose …

Contributors
Fleming, Jacob Michael, Johnston, Carol S, Gaesser, Glenn A, et al.
Created Date
2018

The ability to tolerate bouts of oxygen deprivation varies tremendously across the animal kingdom. Adult humans from different regions show large variation in tolerance to hypoxia; additionally, it is widely known that neonatal mammals are much more tolerant to anoxia than their adult counterparts, including in humans. Drosophila melanogaster are very anoxia-tolerant relative to mammals, with adults able to survive 12 h of anoxia, and represent a well-suited model for studying anoxia tolerance. Drosophila live in rotting, fermenting media and a result are more likely to experience environmental hypoxia; therefore, they could be expected to be more tolerant of anoxia …

Contributors
Campbell, Jacob B, Harrison, Jon F, Gadau, Juergen, et al.
Created Date
2018

The purpose of this dissertation was 1) to develop noninvasive strategies to assess skeletal muscle size, architecture, and composition in young and old adults (study #1) and 2) evaluate the impact of chemotherapeutic treatment on skeletal muscle satellite cells and capillaries (study #2). For study #1 ultrasound images were obtained from the quadriceps muscles of young (8 m, 8 f) and older (7 m, 5 f) participants on two occasions, separated by 5-15 days. Images were collected while the participants were both standing and supine, and were analyzed for muscle thickness, pennation angle, and echogenicity. In addition, test-retest reliability and …

Contributors
D'Lugos, Andrew, Dickinson, Jared M, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2018

Reproduction is energetically costly and seasonal breeding has evolved to capitalize on predictable increases in food availability. The synchronization of breeding with periods of peak food availability is especially important for small birds, most of which do not store an extensive amount of energy. The annual change in photoperiod is the primary environmental cue regulating reproductive development, but must be integrated with supplementary cues relating to local energetic conditions. Photoperiodic regulation of the reproductive neuroendocrine system is well described in seasonally breeding birds, but the mechanisms that these animals use to integrate supplementary cues remain unclear. I hypothesized that (a) …

Contributors
Valle, Shelley, Deviche, Pierre, McGraw, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2018

I examined how competition affects the way animals use thermal resources to control their body temperature. Currently, biologists use a cost benefit analysis to predict how animals should regulate their body temperature. This current theory of thermoregulation does not adequately predict how animals thermoregulate in the wild. While the model works well for animals in low cost habitats, it does not work as well for animals in high cost habitats. For example, animals that are in habitats of low thermal quality thermoregulate more precisely than predicted by the current model. One reason these predictions may be wrong is that they …

Contributors
Borchert, Jason, Angilletta Jr., Michael, Pratt, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Body size plays a pervasive role in determining physiological and behavioral performance across animals. It is generally thought that smaller animals are limited in performance measures compared to larger animals; yet, the vast majority of animals on earth are small and evolutionary trends like miniaturization occur in every animal clade. Therefore, there must be some evolutionary advantages to being small and/or compensatory mechanisms that allow small animals to compete with larger species. In this dissertation I specifically explore the scaling of flight performance (flight metabolic rate, wing beat frequency, load-carrying capacity) and learning behaviors (visual differentiation visual Y-maze learning) across …

Contributors
Duell, Meghan, Harrison, Jon F., Smith, Brian H., et al.
Created Date
2018

Environmental changes are occurring at an unprecedented rate, and these changes will undoubtedly lead to alterations in resource availability for many organisms. To effectively predict the implications of such changes, it is critical to better understand how organisms have adapted to coping with seasonally limited resources. The vast majority of previous work has focused on energy balance as the driver of changes in organismal physiology. While energy is clearly a vital currency, other resources can also be limited and impact physiological functions. Water is essential for life as it is the main constituent of cells, tissues, and organs. Yet, water …

Contributors
Brusch, George Arthur, DeNardo, Dale F, Blattman, Joseph, et al.
Created Date
2019

Hypoxic hypoxia is a physiological condition which can manifest as a result of reduced barometric pressure, resulting in an insufficient amount of oxygen for use by the tissues in the body. Hypoxic hypoxia is of concern to pilots due to dangerous impairment the condition can cause in-flight, such as short term memory loss, incoordination, or incapacitation. Several aircraft incidents and accidents have been attributed to hypoxia in the past ten years. To train for hypoxia recognition, high altitude chambers are used to induce hypoxia in participants, through a reduction of pressure inside a reinforced chamber. The training allows participants to …

Contributors
Stevenson, Kasey, Niemczyk, Mary, Nullmeyer, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

The prevalence of obesity and obesity-related disorders have increased world-wide. In the last decade, the intestinal microbiome has become a major indicator of metabolic and gastrointestinal health. Previous research has shown that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption can alter the microbial composition of the gut by increasing the abundance of gram-positive bacteria associated with the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although, the most common form of obesity and metabolic syndrome intervention is exercise and diet, these recommendations may not improve severe cases of obesity. Thus, an important relevance of my project was to investigate whether the intake of an …

Contributors
Crawford, Meli'sa Shaunte, Sweazea, Karen L, Deviche, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2019

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) declines with age and is a predictor of morbidity and mortality risks. Due to these implications, accurate assessment and determination of VO2max are important for the older population. Without the presence of a VO2 plateau, secondary criteria are used to determine whether the test resulted in a maximal value. However, inconsistent secondary criteria do not account for intersubject variability. To circumvent this issue, a verification phase following a traditional ramp assessment may be utilized. The purpose of this study was to compare verification phase strategies in older adults. A secondary purpose of this study was to …

Contributors
Villanueva, Ian Robert, Dickinson, Jared M, Gaesser, Glenn A, et al.
Created Date
2019

All organisms need to be able to sense and respond to their environment. Much of this process takes place via proteins embedded in the cell membrane, the border between a living thing and the external world. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are a superfamily of membrane proteins that play diverse roles in physiology. Among the 27 TRP channels found in humans and other animals, TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are the primary sensors of cold and hot temperatures, respectively. They underlie the molecular basis of somatic temperature sensation, but beyond this are also known to …

Contributors
Hilton, Jacob, Van Horn, Wade D, Levitus, Marcia, et al.
Created Date
2019

Previously accomplished research examined sensory integration between upper limb proprioception and tactile sensation. The active proprioceptive-tactile relationship points towards an opportunity to examine neuromodulation effects on sensory integration with respect to proprioceptive error magnitude and direction. Efforts to improve focus and attention during upper limb proprioceptive tasks results in a decrease of proprioceptive error magnitudes and greater endpoint accuracy. Increased focus and attention can also be correlated to neurophysiological activity in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) during a variety of mental tasks. Through non-invasive trigeminal nerve stimulation, it may be possible to affect the activity of the LC and induce improvements …

Contributors
Orthlieb, Gerrit Chi Luk, Helms-Tillery, Stephen, Tanner, Justin, et al.
Created Date
2019