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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Status
  • Public
Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Previously accomplished research examined sensory integration between upper limb proprioception and tactile sensation. The active proprioceptive-tactile relationship points towards an opportunity to examine neuromodulation effects on sensory integration with respect to proprioceptive error magnitude and direction. Efforts to improve focus and attention during upper limb proprioceptive tasks results in a decrease of proprioceptive error magnitudes and greater endpoint accuracy. Increased focus and attention can also be correlated to neurophysiological activity in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) during a variety of mental tasks. Through non-invasive trigeminal nerve stimulation, it may be possible to affect the activity of the LC and induce improvements …

Contributors
Orthlieb, Gerrit Chi Luk, Helms-Tillery, Stephen, Tanner, Justin, et al.
Created Date
2019

All organisms need to be able to sense and respond to their environment. Much of this process takes place via proteins embedded in the cell membrane, the border between a living thing and the external world. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are a superfamily of membrane proteins that play diverse roles in physiology. Among the 27 TRP channels found in humans and other animals, TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are the primary sensors of cold and hot temperatures, respectively. They underlie the molecular basis of somatic temperature sensation, but beyond this are also known to …

Contributors
Hilton, Jacob, Van Horn, Wade D, Levitus, Marcia, et al.
Created Date
2019

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) declines with age and is a predictor of morbidity and mortality risks. Due to these implications, accurate assessment and determination of VO2max are important for the older population. Without the presence of a VO2 plateau, secondary criteria are used to determine whether the test resulted in a maximal value. However, inconsistent secondary criteria do not account for intersubject variability. To circumvent this issue, a verification phase following a traditional ramp assessment may be utilized. The purpose of this study was to compare verification phase strategies in older adults. A secondary purpose of this study was to …

Contributors
Villanueva, Ian Robert, Dickinson, Jared M, Gaesser, Glenn A, et al.
Created Date
2019

The prevalence of obesity and obesity-related disorders have increased world-wide. In the last decade, the intestinal microbiome has become a major indicator of metabolic and gastrointestinal health. Previous research has shown that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption can alter the microbial composition of the gut by increasing the abundance of gram-positive bacteria associated with the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although, the most common form of obesity and metabolic syndrome intervention is exercise and diet, these recommendations may not improve severe cases of obesity. Thus, an important relevance of my project was to investigate whether the intake of an …

Contributors
Crawford, Meli'sa Shaunte, Sweazea, Karen L, Deviche, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2019

Hypoxic hypoxia is a physiological condition which can manifest as a result of reduced barometric pressure, resulting in an insufficient amount of oxygen for use by the tissues in the body. Hypoxic hypoxia is of concern to pilots due to dangerous impairment the condition can cause in-flight, such as short term memory loss, incoordination, or incapacitation. Several aircraft incidents and accidents have been attributed to hypoxia in the past ten years. To train for hypoxia recognition, high altitude chambers are used to induce hypoxia in participants, through a reduction of pressure inside a reinforced chamber. The training allows participants to …

Contributors
Stevenson, Kasey, Niemczyk, Mary, Nullmeyer, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019

Environmental changes are occurring at an unprecedented rate, and these changes will undoubtedly lead to alterations in resource availability for many organisms. To effectively predict the implications of such changes, it is critical to better understand how organisms have adapted to coping with seasonally limited resources. The vast majority of previous work has focused on energy balance as the driver of changes in organismal physiology. While energy is clearly a vital currency, other resources can also be limited and impact physiological functions. Water is essential for life as it is the main constituent of cells, tissues, and organs. Yet, water …

Contributors
Brusch, George Arthur, DeNardo, Dale F, Blattman, Joseph, et al.
Created Date
2019

Body size plays a pervasive role in determining physiological and behavioral performance across animals. It is generally thought that smaller animals are limited in performance measures compared to larger animals; yet, the vast majority of animals on earth are small and evolutionary trends like miniaturization occur in every animal clade. Therefore, there must be some evolutionary advantages to being small and/or compensatory mechanisms that allow small animals to compete with larger species. In this dissertation I specifically explore the scaling of flight performance (flight metabolic rate, wing beat frequency, load-carrying capacity) and learning behaviors (visual differentiation visual Y-maze learning) across …

Contributors
Duell, Meghan, Harrison, Jon F., Smith, Brian H., et al.
Created Date
2018

I examined how competition affects the way animals use thermal resources to control their body temperature. Currently, biologists use a cost benefit analysis to predict how animals should regulate their body temperature. This current theory of thermoregulation does not adequately predict how animals thermoregulate in the wild. While the model works well for animals in low cost habitats, it does not work as well for animals in high cost habitats. For example, animals that are in habitats of low thermal quality thermoregulate more precisely than predicted by the current model. One reason these predictions may be wrong is that they …

Contributors
Borchert, Jason, Angilletta Jr., Michael, Pratt, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Reproduction is energetically costly and seasonal breeding has evolved to capitalize on predictable increases in food availability. The synchronization of breeding with periods of peak food availability is especially important for small birds, most of which do not store an extensive amount of energy. The annual change in photoperiod is the primary environmental cue regulating reproductive development, but must be integrated with supplementary cues relating to local energetic conditions. Photoperiodic regulation of the reproductive neuroendocrine system is well described in seasonally breeding birds, but the mechanisms that these animals use to integrate supplementary cues remain unclear. I hypothesized that (a) …

Contributors
Valle, Shelley, Deviche, Pierre, McGraw, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2018

The purpose of this dissertation was 1) to develop noninvasive strategies to assess skeletal muscle size, architecture, and composition in young and old adults (study #1) and 2) evaluate the impact of chemotherapeutic treatment on skeletal muscle satellite cells and capillaries (study #2). For study #1 ultrasound images were obtained from the quadriceps muscles of young (8 m, 8 f) and older (7 m, 5 f) participants on two occasions, separated by 5-15 days. Images were collected while the participants were both standing and supine, and were analyzed for muscle thickness, pennation angle, and echogenicity. In addition, test-retest reliability and …

Contributors
D'Lugos, Andrew, Dickinson, Jared M, Buman, Matthew P, et al.
Created Date
2018