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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Masters Thesis
Status
  • Public
Date Range
2017 2019


What if there is a way to integrate prosthetics seamlessly with the human body and robots could help improve the lives of children with disabilities? With physical human-robot interaction being seen in multiple aspects of life, including industry, medical, and social, how these robots are interacting with human becomes even more important. Therefore, how smoothly the robot can interact with a person will determine how safe and efficient this relationship will be. This thesis investigates adaptive control method that allows a robot to adapt to the human's actions based on the interaction force. Allowing the relationship to become more effortless …

Contributors
Bell, Rebecca C, Zhang, Wenlong, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Reading partners’ actions correctly is essential for successful coordination, but interpretation does not always reflect reality. Attribution biases, such as self-serving and correspondence biases, lead people to misinterpret their partners’ actions and falsely assign blame after an unexpected event. These biases thus further influence people’s trust in their partners, including machine partners. The increasing capabilities and complexity of machines allow them to work physically with humans. However, their improvements may interfere with the accuracy for people to calibrate trust in machines and their capabilities, which requires an understanding of attribution biases’ effect on human-machine coordination. Specifically, the current thesis explores …

Contributors
Hsiung, Chi-Ping, Chiou, Erin, Cooke, Nancy, et al.
Created Date
2019

Highly automated vehicles require drivers to remain aware enough to takeover during critical events. Driver distraction is a key factor that prevents drivers from reacting adequately, and thus there is need for an alert to help drivers regain situational awareness and be able to act quickly and successfully should a critical event arise. This study examines two aspects of alerts that could help facilitate driver takeover: mode (auditory and tactile) and direction (towards and away). Auditory alerts appear to be somewhat more effective than tactile alerts, though both modes produce significantly faster reaction times than no alert. Alerts moving towards …

Contributors
Brogdon, Michael A, Gray, Robert, Branaghan, Russell, et al.
Created Date
2018

There has been an ongoing debate between the relative deterrent power of certainty and severity on deceptive and criminal activity, certainty being the likelihood of capture and severity being the magnitude of the potential punishment. This paper is a review of the current body of research regarding risk assessment and deception in games, specifically regarding certainty and severity. The topics of game theoretical foundations, balance, and design were covered, as were heuristics and individual differences in deceptive behavior. Using this background knowledge, this study implemented a methodology through which the risk assessments of certainty and severity can be compared behaviorally …

Contributors
Day, Nicholas C, Chiou, Erin, Cooke, Nancy, et al.
Created Date
2019

The prospects of commercially available autonomous vehicles are surely tantalizing, however the implementation of these vehicles and their strain on the social dynamics between motorists and pedestrians remains unknown. Questions concerning how autonomous vehicles will communicate safety and intent to pedestrians remain largely unanswered. This study examines the efficacy of various proposed technologies for bridging the communication gap between self-driving cars and pedestrians. Displays utilizing words like “safe” and “danger” seem to be effective in communicating with pedestrians and other road users. Future research should attempt to study different external notification interfaces in real-life settings to more accurately gauge pedestrian …

Contributors
Muqolli, Endrit, Cooke, Nancy, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Allocating tasks for a day's or week's schedule is known to be a challenging and difficult problem. The problem intensifies by many folds in multi-agent settings. A planner or group of planners who decide such kind of task association schedule must have a comprehensive perspective on (1) the entire array of tasks to be scheduled (2) idea on constraints like importance cum order of tasks and (3) the individual abilities of the operators. One example of such kind of scheduling is the crew scheduling done for astronauts who will spend time at International Space Station (ISS). The schedule for the …

Contributors
MIshra, Aditya Prasad, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Previous literature was reviewed in an effort to further investigate the link between notification levels of a cell phone and their effects on driver distraction. Mind-wandering has been suggested as an explanation for distraction and has been previously operationalized with oculomotor movement. Mind-wandering’s definition is debated, but in this research it was defined as off task thoughts that occur due to the task not requiring full cognitive capacity. Drivers were asked to operate a driving simulator and follow audio turn by turn directions while experiencing each of three cell phone notification levels: Control (no texts), Airplane (texts with no notifications), …

Contributors
Radina, Earl, Gray, Robert, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Future autonomous vehicle systems will be diverse in design and functionality since they will be produced by different brands. In the automotive industry, trustworthiness of a vehicle is closely tied to its perceived safety. Trust involves dependence on another agent in an uncertain situation. Perceptions of system safety, trustworthiness, and performance are important because they guide people’s behavior towards automation. Specifically, these perceptions impact how reliant people believe they can be on the system to do a certain task. Over or under reliance can be a concern for safety because they involve the person allocating tasks between themselves and the …

Contributors
Celmer, Natalie, Branaghan, Russell, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2018

The medical field is constantly looking for technological solutions to reduce user-error and improve procedures. As a potential solution for healthcare environments, Augmented Reality (AR) has received increasing attention in the past few decades due to advances in computing capabilities, lower cost, and better displays (Sauer, Khamene, Bascle, Vogt, & Rubino, 2002). Augmented Reality, as defined in Ronald Azuma’s initial survey of AR, combines virtual and real-world environments in three dimensions and in real-time (Azuma, 1997). Because visualization displays used in AR are related to human physiologic and cognitive constraints, any new system must improve on previous methods and be …

Contributors
del Rio, Richard Alexander, Branaghan, Russell, Gray, Rob, et al.
Created Date
2017

ELearning, distance learning, has been a fast-developing topic in educational area. In 1999, Mayer put forward “Cognitive Theory of Multimedia learning” (Moreno, & Mayer, 1999). The theory consisted of several principles. One of the principles, Modality Principle describes that when learners are presented with spoken words, their performance are better than that with on-screen texts (Mayer, R., Dow, & Mayer, S. 2003; Moreno, & Mayer, 1999).It gave an implication that learners performance can be affected by modality of learning materials. A very common tool in education in literature and language is narrative. This way of storytelling has received success in …

Contributors
Wu, Mengxuan, Craig, Scotty D., Branaghan, Russell, et al.
Created Date
2018