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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Multiphase flows are an important part of many natural and technological phe- nomena such as ocean-air coupling (which is important for climate modeling) and the atomization of liquid fuel jets in combustion engines. The unique challenges of multiphase flow often make analytical solutions to the governing equations impos- sible and experimental investigations very difficult. Thus, high-fidelity numerical simulations can play a pivotal role in understanding these systems. This disserta- tion describes numerical methods developed for complex multiphase flows and the simulations performed using these methods. First, the issue of multiphase code verification is addressed. Code verification answers the question "Is …

Contributors
Brady, Peter, Herrmann, Marcus, Lopez, Juan, et al.
Created Date
2011

This dissertation describes a process for interface capturing via an arbitrary-order, nearly quadrature free, discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for the conservative level set method (Olsson et al., 2005, 2008). The DG numerical method is utilized to solve both advection and reinitialization, and executed on a refined level set grid (Herrmann, 2008) for effective use of processing power. Computation is executed in parallel utilizing both CPU and GPU architectures to make the method feasible at high order. Finally, a sparse data structure is implemented to take full advantage of parallelism on the GPU, where performance relies on well-managed memory operations. With …

Contributors
Jibben, Zechariah, Herrmann, Marcus, Squires, Kyle, et al.
Created Date
2015

The study of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in explosives is of prime importance with regards to insensitive munitions (IM). Critical damage owing to thermal or shock stimuli could translate to significant loss of life and material. The present study models detonation and deflagration of a commonly used granular explosive: cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine, HMX. A robust literature review is followed by computational modeling of gas gun and DDT tube test data using the Sandia National Lab three-dimensional multi-material Eulerian hydrocode CTH. This dissertation proposes new computational practices and models that aid in predicting shock stimulus IM response. CTH was first used to …

Contributors
Mahon, Kelly Susan, Lee, Taewoo, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation introduces FARCOM (Fortran Adaptive Refiner for Cartesian Orthogonal Meshes), a new general library for adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) based on an unstructured hexahedral mesh framework. As a result of the underlying unstructured formulation, the refinement and coarsening operators of the library operate on a single-cell basis and perform in-situ replacement of old mesh elements. This approach allows for h-refinement without the memory and computational expense of calculating masked coarse grid cells, as is done in traditional patch-based AMR approaches, and enables unstructured flow solvers to have access to the automated domain generation capabilities usually only found in tree …

Contributors
Ballesteros, Carlos Alberto, Herrmann, Marcus, Adrian, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2019