Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This thesis uses an aircraft aerodynamic model and propulsion data, which represents a configuration similar to the Airbus A320, to perform trade studies to understand the weight and configuration effects of “out-of-trim” flight during takeoff, cruise, initial approach, and balked landing. It is found that flying an aircraft slightly above the angle of attack or pitch angle required for a trimmed, stabilized flight will cause the aircraft to lose speed rapidly. This effect is most noticeable for lighter aircraft and when one engine is rendered inoperative. In the event of an engine failure, if the pilot does not pitch the …

Contributors
Delisle, Mathew Robert, Takahashi, Timothy, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2018

This thesis explores the human factors effects pilots have when controlling the aircraft during the takeoff phase of flight. These variables come into play in the transitory phase from ground roll to flight, and in the initiation of procedures to abort a takeoff during the ground run. The FAA provides regulations for manufacturers and operators to follow, ensuring safe manufacture of aircraft and pilots that fly without endangering the passengers; however, details regarding accounting of piloting variability are lacking. Creation of a numerical simulation allowed for the controlled variation of isolated piloting procedures in order to evaluate effects on field …

Contributors
Wood, Donald Leland, Takahashi, Timothy T, Niemczyk, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2017

The aviation industry is considered to be the safest when it comes to transportation of people and property. The standards by which companies provide air transportation are held are very high. Nevertheless, a shortage in the number of pilots exists and companies must look for ways to meet demands. One of the ways to resolve this issue is to introduce unmanned systems on a broader scale – to transport people and property. The public’s perception regarding this issue has not been well documented. This survey identified what the public’s attitude is towards the use of these systems. One hundred fifty-seven …

Contributors
Wollert, Matthew Benjamin, Niemczyk, Mary, Nullmeyer, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2018

To ensure safety is not precluded in the event of an engine failure, the FAA has established climb gradient minimums enforced through Federal Regulations. Furthermore, to ensure aircraft do not accidentally impact an obstacle on takeoff due to insufficient climb performance, standard instrument departure procedures have their own set of climb gradient minimums which are typically more than those set by Federal Regulation. This inconsistency between climb gradient expectations creates an obstacle clearance problem: while the aircraft has enough climb gradient in the engine inoperative condition so that basic flight safety is not precluded, this climb gradient is often not …

Contributors
Beard, John Eng Hui, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2017