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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




There are significant fuel consumption consequences for non-optimal flight operations. This study is intended to analyze and highlight areas of interest that affect fuel consumption in typical flight operations. By gathering information from actual flight operators (pilots, dispatch, performance engineers, and air traffic controllers), real performance issues can be addressed and analyzed. A series of interviews were performed with various individuals in the industry and organizations. The wide range of insight directed this study to focus on FAA regulations, airline policy, the ATC system, weather, and flight planning. The goal is to highlight where operational performance differs from design intent …

Contributors
Heitzman, Nicholas, Takahashi, Timothy T, Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2014

Modern aircraft are expected to fly faster and more efficiently than their predecessors. To improve aerodynamic efficiency, designers must carefully consider and handle shock wave formation. Presently, many designers utilize computationally heavy optimization methods to design wings. While these methods may work, they do not provide insight. This thesis aims to better understand fundamental methods that govern wing design. In order to further understand the flow in the transonic regime, this work revisits the Transonic Similarity Rule. This rule postulates an equivalent incompressible geometry to any high speed geometry in flight and postulates a “stretching” analogy. This thesis utilizes panel …

Contributors
Kirkman, Jeffrey Jordan, Takahashi, Timothy T, Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2016

To ensure safety is not precluded in the event of an engine failure, the FAA has established climb gradient minimums enforced through Federal Regulations. Furthermore, to ensure aircraft do not accidentally impact an obstacle on takeoff due to insufficient climb performance, standard instrument departure procedures have their own set of climb gradient minimums which are typically more than those set by Federal Regulation. This inconsistency between climb gradient expectations creates an obstacle clearance problem: while the aircraft has enough climb gradient in the engine inoperative condition so that basic flight safety is not precluded, this climb gradient is often not …

Contributors
Beard, John Eng Hui, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2017

This thesis gives a detailed design process for a pulsed type thruster. The thrust stand designed in this paper is for a Pulsed Plasma Thruster built by Sun Devil Satellite Laboratory, a student organization at Arizona State University. The thrust stand uses a torsional beam rotating to record displacement. This information, along with impulse-momentum theorem is applied to find the impulse bit of the thruster, which varies largely from other designs which focus on using the natural dynamics their fixtures. The target impulse to record on this fixture was estimated to be 275 μN-s of impulse. Through calibration and experimentation, …

Contributors
Verbin, Andrew Joseph, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel B, et al.
Created Date
2017

This thesis explores the human factors effects pilots have when controlling the aircraft during the takeoff phase of flight. These variables come into play in the transitory phase from ground roll to flight, and in the initiation of procedures to abort a takeoff during the ground run. The FAA provides regulations for manufacturers and operators to follow, ensuring safe manufacture of aircraft and pilots that fly without endangering the passengers; however, details regarding accounting of piloting variability are lacking. Creation of a numerical simulation allowed for the controlled variation of isolated piloting procedures in order to evaluate effects on field …

Contributors
Wood, Donald Leland, Takahashi, Timothy T, Niemczyk, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2017

The Doghouse Plot visually represents an aircraft’s performance during combined turn-climb maneuvers. The Doghouse Plot completely describes the turn-climb capability of an aircraft; a single plot demonstrates the relationship between climb performance, turn rate, turn radius, stall margin, and bank angle. Using NASA legacy codes, Empirical Drag Estimation Technique (EDET) and Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), it is possible to reverse engineer sufficient basis data for commercial and military aircraft to construct Doghouse Plots. Engineers and operators can then use these to assess their aircraft’s full performance envelope. The insight gained from these plots can broaden the understanding of an …

Contributors
Wilson, John Robert, Takahashi, Timothy T, Middleton, James, et al.
Created Date
2017

Two methods of improving the life and efficiency of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) have been investigated. The first is a trade study of available switches to determine the best device to implement in the PIT design. The second is the design of a coil to improve coupling between the accelerator coil and the plasma. Experiments were done with both permanent and electromagnets to investigate the feasibility of implementing a modified Halbach array within the PIT to promote better plasma coupling and decrease the unused space within the thruster. This array proved to promote more complete coupling on the edges …

Contributors
Raines, Taylor, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel B, et al.
Created Date
2018

This paper describes an effort to bring wing structural stiffness and aeroelastic considerations early in the conceptual design process with an automated tool. Stiffness and aeroelasticity can be well represented with a stochastic model during conceptual design because of the high level of uncertainty and variability in wing non-structural mass such as fuel loading and control surfaces. To accomplish this, an improvement is made to existing design tools utilizing rule based automated design to generate wing torque box geometry from a specific wing outer mold-line. Simple analysis on deflection and inferred stiffness shows how early conceptual design choices can strongly …

Contributors
Miskin, Daniel L, Takahashi, Timothy T, Mignolet, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2018