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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




A design methodology for a new breed of launch vehicle capable of lofting small satellites to orbit is discussed. The growing need for such a rocket is great: the United States has no capabilities in place to quickly launch and reconstitute satellite constellations. A loss of just one satellite, natural or induced, could significantly degrade or entirely eliminate critical space-based assets which would need to be quickly replaced. Furthermore a rocket capable of meeting the requirements for operationally responsive space missions would be an ideal launch platform for small commercial satellites. The proposed architecture to alleviate this lack of an …

Contributors
Villarreal, James Kendall, Squires, Kyle, Lee, Taewoo, et al.
Created Date
2011

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation is the industry standard for computing practical turbulent flows -- since large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) require comparatively massive computational power to simulate even relatively simple flows. RANS, like LES, requires that a user specify a “closure model” for the underlying turbulence physics. However, despite more than 60 years of research into turbulence modeling, current models remain largely unable to accurately predict key aspects of the complex turbulent flows frequently encountered in practical engineering applications. Recently a new approach, termed “autonomic closure”, has been developed for LES that avoids the need to …

Contributors
Ahlf, Rick, Dahm, Werner J.A., Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2017

There are significant fuel consumption consequences for non-optimal flight operations. This study is intended to analyze and highlight areas of interest that affect fuel consumption in typical flight operations. By gathering information from actual flight operators (pilots, dispatch, performance engineers, and air traffic controllers), real performance issues can be addressed and analyzed. A series of interviews were performed with various individuals in the industry and organizations. The wide range of insight directed this study to focus on FAA regulations, airline policy, the ATC system, weather, and flight planning. The goal is to highlight where operational performance differs from design intent …

Contributors
Heitzman, Nicholas, Takahashi, Timothy T, Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2014

This report provides an overview of scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicle modeling and control challenges. Such vehicles are characterized by unstable non-minimum phase dynamics with significant coupling and low thrust margins. Recent trends in hypersonic vehicle research are summarized. To illustrate control relevant design issues and tradeoffs, a generic nonlinear 3DOF longitudinal dynamics model capturing aero-elastic-propulsive interactions for wedge-shaped vehicle is used. Limitations of the model are discussed and numerous modifications have been made to address control relevant needs. Two different baseline configurations are examined over a two-stage to orbit ascent trajectory. The report highlights how vehicle level-flight static (trim) and dynamic …

Contributors
Dickeson, Jeffrey James, Rodriguez, Armando A, Tsakalis, Konstantinos, et al.
Created Date
2012

This thesis describes a longitudinal dynamic analysis of a large, twin-fuselage aircraft that is connected solely by the main wing with two tails unattached by a horizontal stabilizer. The goal of the analysis is to predict the aircraft’s behavior in various flight conditions. Starting with simple force diagrams of the longitudinal directions, six equations of motion are derived: three equations defining the left fuselage’s motion and three equations defining the right fuselage’s motion. The derivation uses a state-vector approach. Linearization of the system utilizes a Taylor series expansion about different trim points to analyze the aircraft for small disturbances about …

Contributors
Spiller, Ryan K, Wells, Valana, Garrett, Frederick, et al.
Created Date
2017

This thesis discusses the equilibrium conditions and static stability of a rotorcraft kite with a single main tether flying in steady wind conditions. A dynamic model with five degrees of freedom is derived using Lagrangian formulation, which explicitly avoids any constraint force in the equations of motion. The longitudinal static stability of the steady flight under constant wind conditions is analyzed analytically from the equilibrium conditions. The rotorcraft kite orientation and tether angle are correlated through the equation Γ=δ-ϑ, a necessary condition for equilibrium. A rotorcraft kite design with 3kg mass and 1.25m rotor radius is found to be longitudinally …

Contributors
Hernandez, Brendan, Wells, Valana, Garrett, Frederick, et al.
Created Date
2017

Derived from the necessity to increase testing capabilities of hybrid rocket motor (HRM) propulsion systems for Daedalus Astronautics at Arizona State University, a small-scale motor and test stand were designed and developed to characterize all components of the system. The motor is designed for simple integration and setup, such that both the forward-end enclosure and end cap can be easily removed for rapid integration of components during testing. Each of the components of the motor is removable allowing for a broad range of testing capabilities. While examining injectors and their potential it is thought ideal to obtain the highest regression …

Contributors
Summers, Matt H., Lee, Taewoo, Chen, Kangping, et al.
Created Date
2013

Modern aircraft are expected to fly faster and more efficiently than their predecessors. To improve aerodynamic efficiency, designers must carefully consider and handle shock wave formation. Presently, many designers utilize computationally heavy optimization methods to design wings. While these methods may work, they do not provide insight. This thesis aims to better understand fundamental methods that govern wing design. In order to further understand the flow in the transonic regime, this work revisits the Transonic Similarity Rule. This rule postulates an equivalent incompressible geometry to any high speed geometry in flight and postulates a “stretching” analogy. This thesis utilizes panel …

Contributors
Kirkman, Jeffrey Jordan, Takahashi, Timothy T, Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2016