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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


This thesis uses an aircraft aerodynamic model and propulsion data, which represents a configuration similar to the Airbus A320, to perform trade studies to understand the weight and configuration effects of “out-of-trim” flight during takeoff, cruise, initial approach, and balked landing. It is found that flying an aircraft slightly above the angle of attack or pitch angle required for a trimmed, stabilized flight will cause the aircraft to lose speed rapidly. This effect is most noticeable for lighter aircraft and when one engine is rendered inoperative. In the event of an engine failure, if the pilot does not pitch the …

Contributors
Delisle, Mathew Robert, Takahashi, Timothy, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2018

There are many computer aided engineering tools and software used by aerospace engineers to design and predict specific parameters of an airplane. These tools help a design engineer predict and calculate such parameters such as lift, drag, pitching moment, takeoff range, maximum takeoff weight, maximum flight range and much more. However, there are very limited ways to predict and calculate the minimum control speeds of an airplane in engine inoperative flight. There are simple solutions, as well as complicated solutions, yet there is neither standard technique nor consistency throughout the aerospace industry. To further complicate this subject, airplane designers have …

Contributors
Hadder, Eric Michael, Takahashi, Timothy, Mignolet, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2016

To ensure safety is not precluded in the event of an engine failure, the FAA has established climb gradient minimums enforced through Federal Regulations. Furthermore, to ensure aircraft do not accidentally impact an obstacle on takeoff due to insufficient climb performance, standard instrument departure procedures have their own set of climb gradient minimums which are typically more than those set by Federal Regulation. This inconsistency between climb gradient expectations creates an obstacle clearance problem: while the aircraft has enough climb gradient in the engine inoperative condition so that basic flight safety is not precluded, this climb gradient is often not …

Contributors
Beard, John Eng Hui, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2017

The Doghouse Plot visually represents an aircraft’s performance during combined turn-climb maneuvers. The Doghouse Plot completely describes the turn-climb capability of an aircraft; a single plot demonstrates the relationship between climb performance, turn rate, turn radius, stall margin, and bank angle. Using NASA legacy codes, Empirical Drag Estimation Technique (EDET) and Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), it is possible to reverse engineer sufficient basis data for commercial and military aircraft to construct Doghouse Plots. Engineers and operators can then use these to assess their aircraft’s full performance envelope. The insight gained from these plots can broaden the understanding of an …

Contributors
Wilson, John Robert, Takahashi, Timothy T, Middleton, James, et al.
Created Date
2017

The objective of this study is to understand how to integrate conical spike external compression inlets with high bypass turbofan engines for application on future supersonic airliners. Many performance problems arise when inlets are matched with engines as inlets come with a plethora of limitations and losses that greatly affect an engine’s ability to operate. These limitations and losses include drag due to inlet spillage, bleed ducts, and bypass doors, as well as the maximum and minimum values of mass flow ratio at each Mach number that define when an engine can no longer function. A collection of tools was …

Contributors
Cleary, Spencer, Takahashi, Timothy, White, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2018