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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




In today’s day and age, the use of automated technology is becoming increasingly prevalent. Throughout the aerospace industry, we see the use of automated systems in manufacturing, testing, and, progressively, in design. This thesis focuses on the idea of automated structural design that can be directly coupled with parametric Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and used to support aircraft conceptual design. This idea has been around for many years; however, with the advancement of CAD technology, it is becoming more realistic. Having the ability to input design parameters, analyze the structure, and produce a basic CAD model not only saves time in …

Contributors
Anderson, Benjamin Kyle, Takahashi, Timothy, Bolukbasi, Akif, et al.
Created Date
2017

This report provides an overview of scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicle modeling and control challenges. Such vehicles are characterized by unstable non-minimum phase dynamics with significant coupling and low thrust margins. Recent trends in hypersonic vehicle research are summarized. To illustrate control relevant design issues and tradeoffs, a generic nonlinear 3DOF longitudinal dynamics model capturing aero-elastic-propulsive interactions for wedge-shaped vehicle is used. Limitations of the model are discussed and numerous modifications have been made to address control relevant needs. Two different baseline configurations are examined over a two-stage to orbit ascent trajectory. The report highlights how vehicle level-flight static (trim) and dynamic …

Contributors
Dickeson, Jeffrey James, Rodriguez, Armando A, Tsakalis, Konstantinos, et al.
Created Date
2012

This thesis gives a detailed design process for a pulsed type thruster. The thrust stand designed in this paper is for a Pulsed Plasma Thruster built by Sun Devil Satellite Laboratory, a student organization at Arizona State University. The thrust stand uses a torsional beam rotating to record displacement. This information, along with impulse-momentum theorem is applied to find the impulse bit of the thruster, which varies largely from other designs which focus on using the natural dynamics their fixtures. The target impulse to record on this fixture was estimated to be 275 μN-s of impulse. Through calibration and experimentation, …

Contributors
Verbin, Andrew Joseph, Takahashi, Timothy T, White, Daniel B, et al.
Created Date
2017

This paper describes an effort to bring wing structural stiffness and aeroelastic considerations early in the conceptual design process with an automated tool. Stiffness and aeroelasticity can be well represented with a stochastic model during conceptual design because of the high level of uncertainty and variability in wing non-structural mass such as fuel loading and control surfaces. To accomplish this, an improvement is made to existing design tools utilizing rule based automated design to generate wing torque box geometry from a specific wing outer mold-line. Simple analysis on deflection and inferred stiffness shows how early conceptual design choices can strongly …

Contributors
Miskin, Daniel L, Takahashi, Timothy T, Mignolet, Marc, et al.
Created Date
2018

From 2001-2011, the General Aviation (GA) fatal accident rate remained unchanged (Duquette & Dorr, 2014) with an overall stagnant accident rate between 2004 and 2013. The leading cause, loss of control in flight (NTSB, 2015b & 2015c) due to pilot inability to recognize approach to stall/spin conditions (NTSB, 2015b & 2016b). In 2013, there were 1,224 GA accidents in the U.S., accounting for 94% of all U.S. aviation accidents and 90% of all U.S. aviation fatalities that year (NTSB, 2015c). Aviation entails multiple challenges for pilots related to task management, procedural errors, perceptual distortions, and cognitive discrepancies. While machine errors …

Contributors
Conaway, Cody Ryan, Gray, Robert, Branaghan, Russell, et al.
Created Date
2016