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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




For a conventional quadcopter system with 4 planar rotors, flight times vary between 10 to 20 minutes depending on the weight of the quadcopter and the size of the battery used. In order to increase the flight time, either the weight of the quadcopter should be reduced or the battery size should be increased. Another way is to increase the efficiency of the propellers. Previous research shows that ducting a propeller can cause an increase of up to 94 % in the thrust produced by the rotor-duct system. This research focused on developing and testing a quadcopter having a centrally …

Contributors
Lal, Harsh, Artemiadis, Panagiotis, Lee, Hyunglae, et al.
Created Date
2019

Wearable robotics has gained huge popularity in recent years due to its wide applications in rehabilitation, military, and industrial fields. The weakness of the skeletal muscles in the aging population and neurological injuries such as stroke and spinal cord injuries seriously limit the abilities of these individuals to perform daily activities. Therefore, there is an increasing attention in the development of wearable robots to assist the elderly and patients with disabilities for motion assistance and rehabilitation. In military and industrial sectors, wearable robots can increase the productivity of workers and soldiers. It is important for the wearable robots to maintain …

Contributors
Chinimilli, Prudhvi Tej, Redkar, Sangram, Zhang, Wenlong, et al.
Created Date
2018

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are widely used in many applications because of their small size, great mobility and hover performance. This has been a consequence of the fast development of electronics, cheap lightweight flight controllers for accurate positioning and cameras. This thesis describes modeling, control and design of an oblique-cross-quadcopter platform for indoor-environments. One contribution of the work was the design of a new printed-circuit-board (PCB) flight controller (called MARK3). Key features/capabilities are as follows: (1) a Teensy 3.2 microcontroller with 168MHz overclock –used for communications, full-state estimation and inner-outer loop hierarchical rate-angle-speed-position control, (2) an on-board MEMS inertial-measurement-unit (IMU) …

Contributors
Lu, Shi, Rodriguez, Armando A., Tsakalis, Konstantinos, et al.
Created Date
2018

There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the …

Contributors
Lin, Yucong, Saripalli, Srikanth, Scowen, Paul, et al.
Created Date
2015