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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2018


Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) are the leading causes of early onset dementia. There are currently no ways to slow down progression, to prevent or cure AD and FTD. Both AD and FTD share a lot of the symptoms and pathology. Initial symptoms such as confusion, memory loss, mood swings and behavioral changes are common in both these dementia subtypes. Neurofibrillary tau tangles and intraneuronal aggregates of TAR DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) are also observed in both AD and FTD. Hence, FTD cases are often misdiagnosed as AD due to a lack of accurate diagnostics. Prior to …

Contributors
Venkataraman, Lalitha, Sierks, Michael R, Dunckley, Travis, et al.
Created Date
2018

Mathematical modeling and decision-making within the healthcare industry have given means to quantitatively evaluate the impact of decisions into diagnosis, screening, and treatment of diseases. In this work, we look into a specific, yet very important disease, the Alzheimer. In the United States, Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the 6th leading cause of death. Diagnosis of AD cannot be confidently confirmed until after death. This has prompted the importance of early diagnosis of AD, based upon symptoms of cognitive decline. A symptom of early cognitive decline and indicator of AD is Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). In addition to this qualitative test, …

Contributors
Camarena, Raquel, Pedrielli, Giulia, Li, Jing, et al.
Created Date
2018

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are defined by the loss of several types of neurons and glial cells within the central nervous system (CNS). Combatting these diseases requires a robust population of relevant cell types that can be employed in cell therapies, drug screening, or patient specific disease modeling. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have the ability to self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into the various neuronal and glial cell types of the CNS. In order to realize the potential of hNPCs, it is necessary to develop a xeno-free …

Contributors
Morgan, Daylin, Brafman, David, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, et al.
Created Date
2018

The apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 genotype is the most prevalent known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this paper, we examined the longitudinal effect of APOE e4 on hippocampal morphometry in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Generally, atrophy of hippocampus has more chance occurs in AD patients who carrying the APOE e4 allele than those who are APOE e4 noncarriers. Also, brain structure and function depend on APOE genotype not just for Alzheimer's disease patients but also in health elderly individuals, so APOE genotyping is considered critical in clinical trials of Alzheimer's disease. We used a large sample …

Contributors
Li, Bolun, Wang, Yalin, Maciejewski, Ross, et al.
Created Date
2015

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia leading to cognitive dysfunction and memory loss as well as emotional and behavioral disorders. It is the 6th leading cause of death in United States, and the only one among top 10 death causes that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. An estimated 5.4 million Americans live with AD, and this number is expected to triple by year 2050 as the baby boomers age. The cost of care for AD in the US is about $200 billion each year. Unfortunately, in addition to the lack of an effective treatment or …

Contributors
Tian, Huilai, Sierks, Michael R, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2014

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the most common form of dementia. Its cause remains unknown, but it is known to involve two hallmark pathologies: Amyloid Beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Several proteins have been implicated in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, including Tau and S100B. S100B is a dimeric protein that is typically found bound to Ca(II) or Zn(II). These experiments relate to the involvement of S100B in Alzheimer's Disease-related processes and the results suggest that future research of S100B is warranted. Zn(II)-S100B was found to increase the rate …

Contributors
Naegele, Hayley Golek, Mcgregor, Wade C, Baluch, Debra, et al.
Created Date
2013

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia observed in elderly patients and has significant social-economic impact. There are many initiatives which aim to capture leading causes of AD. Several genetic, imaging, and biochemical markers are being explored to monitor progression of AD and explore treatment and detection options. The primary focus of this thesis is to identify key biomarkers to understand the pathogenesis and prognosis of Alzheimer's Disease. Feature selection is the process of finding a subset of relevant features to develop efficient and robust learning models. It is an active research topic in diverse areas such …

Contributors
Dubey, Rashmi, Ye, Jieping, Wang, Yalin, et al.
Created Date
2012

The goal of this thesis is to test whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with distinctive humoral immune changes that can be detected in plasma and tracked across time. This is relevant because AD is the principal cause of dementia, and yet, no specific diagnostic tests are universally employed in clinical practice to predict, diagnose or monitor disease progression. In particular, I describe herein a proteomic platform developed at the Center for Innovations in Medicine (CIM) consisting of a slide with 10.000 random-sequence peptides printed on its surface, which is used as the solid phase of an immunoassay where antibodies …

Contributors
Restrepo Jimenez, Lucas, Johnston, Stephen A, Chang, Yung, et al.
Created Date
2011