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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Masters Thesis
Subject
Date Range
2010 2017


This thesis focuses on the impacts of building regulations, in the form of building codes, on the development of an urban fabric. In particular, it investigates the role of building codes on a place that has an inherent sociocultural structure that manifests itself spatially. Using Kuwait City, a once traditional Islamic city, impacts of ‘international’ standards employed through master planning are explored at the neighborhood scale. Kuwait City serves as an ideal case study because of its historic Islamic and Arabic urban pattern that was derived from sociocultural customs, religious beliefs and terrestrial conditions. These influences resulted in a once …

Contributors
AlKhaled, Saud Reyadh, Talen, Emily, Webster, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2016

A post occupancy evaluation (POE) was conducted at the Ngeruka Health Center (NHC) in the Bugesera District of Rwanda. The POE was limited to the education spaces within the health center, its participants, and staff. A POE is a combination of methods both quantitative and qualitative to determine user satisfaction and whether the design intent of the built environment was met. In rural Rwanda where healthcare facilities are scarce and people become seriously ill from preventable diseases, help is needed. The smallest injuries become life threatening. Healthcare facilities and providers must develop approaches that stop these minor illnesses and diseases …

Contributors
Wakelam, Sheila M., Takamura, John, Patterson, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

The ability to design high performance buildings has acquired great importance in recent years due to numerous federal, societal and environmental initiatives. However, this endeavor is much more demanding in terms of designer expertise and time. It requires a whole new level of synergy between automated performance prediction with the human capabilities to perceive, evaluate and ultimately select a suitable solution. While performance prediction can be highly automated through the use of computers, performance evaluation cannot, unless it is with respect to a single criterion. The need to address multi-criteria requirements makes it more valuable for a designer to know …

Contributors
Dutta, Ranojoy, Reddy, T Agami, Runger, George, et al.
Created Date
2013

ABSTRACT Nursing physical fatigue is a critical issue that may lead to degradation of care delivery and ultimately result in medical errors. This issue is equally relevant due to the looming shortage of nurses, which has been linked to the physical demands and potential occupational hazards intrinsic to the profession; as well as to the graying of the nursing workforce who experiences gradual loss of strength and agility that accompanies aging as time in the career advances. In a hospital Emergency Department, the level of nursing physical fatigue can potentially reach its threshold in light of challenging workloads, scope of …

Contributors
Shakman, Karen, Bender, Diane, Stein, Morris, et al.
Created Date
2011

The green building movement has been an effective catalyst in reducing energy demands of buildings and a large number of `green' certified buildings have been in operation for several years. Whether these buildings are actually performing as intended, and if not, identifying specific causes for this discrepancy falls into the general realm of post-occupancy evaluation (POE). POE involves evaluating building performance in terms of energy-use, indoor environmental quality, acoustics and water-use; the first aspect i.e. energy-use is addressed in this thesis. Normally, a full year or more of energy-use and weather data is required to determine the actual post-occupancy energy-use …

Contributors
Singh, Vipul, Reddy, T. Agami, Bryan, Harvey, et al.
Created Date
2011

In geographical locations with hot-arid climates, sun control in buildings is one primary problem to solve for the building envelope design. Today's technological advances in building science bring with them the opportunity to design dynamic façade systems for sun radiation control and daylighting. Although dynamic systems can become an attractive visual element, they can be costly and challenging to maintain for building owners. Alternatively, fixed solar-shading systems can be designed to create dynamism in the façade of the building, while providing similar functionalities for sun control. The work presented in this project focuses on the use of a visual scripting …

Contributors
Grijalva, Karla, Bryan, Harvey J, Griffiths, Jason, et al.
Created Date
2012

Residential energy consumption accounts for 22% of the total energy use in the United States. The consumer's perception of energy usage and conservation are very inaccurate which is leading to growing number of individuals who try to seek out ways to use energy more wisely. Hence behavioral change in consumers with respect to energy use, by providing energy use feedback may be important in reducing home energy consumption. Real-time energy information feedback delivered via technology along with feedback interventions has been reported to produce up to 20 percent declines in residential energy consumption through past research and pilot studies. There …

Contributors
Rungta, Shaily, Bryan, Harvey, Reddy, Agami, et al.
Created Date
2013

A growing body of research shows that characteristics of the built environment in healthcare facilities impact patients' well-being. Research findings suggest that patients form judgments of perceived quality care based on environmental characteristics. Patient outcomes and ratings of quality of care are linked to the environments' ability to reduce patient stress as well as influence perceptions of quality of care. Historically, this research has been focused in the hospital environment. The United States healthcare system heavily relies on hospitals to treat (rather than prevent) illness, leading to a high per capita healthcare expenditure. Currently, this healthcare system is shifting to …

Contributors
Badura, Kerri Christina, Lamb, Gerri, Heywood, William, et al.
Created Date
2012

Improving the conditions of schools in many parts of the world is gradually acquiring importance. The Green School movement is an integral part of this effort since it aims at improving indoor environmental conditions. This would in turn, enhance student- learning while minimizing adverse environmental impact through energy efficiency of comfort-related HVAC and lighting systems. This research, which is a part of a larger research project, aims at evaluating different school building designs in Albania in terms of energy use and indoor thermal comfort, and identify energy efficient options of existing schools. We start by identifying three different climate zones …

Contributors
Dalvi, Ambalika Rajendra, Reddy, Agami, Bryan, Harvey, et al.
Created Date
2015

For most of our history humans have been closely tied to energy provided by the sun. Phases of light and dark initiate major biological functions within each day and regulate patterns of sleep and heightened alertness. Daylight was historically synonymous with sophisticated architecture, providing a mysterious play of light and illuminating productive tasks. It is only within the last 150 years that humans have sought to improve upon daylight, largely replacing it with artificially fueled systems. A new scientific approach to providing interior light has focused on the visible spectrum, negating the remainder of energy from our lives. This thesis …

Contributors
Marotta, Nickolas Adam, Bernardi, Jose, Rowen, Marthe, et al.
Created Date
2013