Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2012 2018


Automated planning problems classically involve finding a sequence of actions that transform an initial state to some state satisfying a conjunctive set of goals with no temporal constraints. But in many real-world problems, the best plan may involve satisfying only a subset of goals or missing defined goal deadlines. For example, this may be required when goals are logically conflicting, or when there are time or cost constraints such that achieving all goals on time may be too expensive. In this case, goals and deadlines must be declared as soft. I call these partial satisfaction planning (PSP) problems. In this …

Contributors
Benton, J., Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2012

As we migrate into an era of personalized medicine, understanding how bio-molecules interact with one another to form cellular systems is one of the key focus areas of systems biology. Several challenges such as the dynamic nature of cellular systems, uncertainty due to environmental influences, and the heterogeneity between individual patients render this a difficult task. In the last decade, several algorithms have been proposed to elucidate cellular systems from data, resulting in numerous data-driven hypotheses. However, due to the large number of variables involved in the process, many of which are unknown or not measurable, such computational approaches often …

Contributors
Ramesh, Archana, Kim, Seungchan, Langley, Patrick W, et al.
Created Date
2012

There has been a lot of research in the field of artificial intelligence about thinking machines. Alan Turing proposed a test to observe a machine's intelligent behaviour with respect to natural language conversation. The Winograd schema challenge is suggested as an alternative, to the Turing test. It needs inferencing capabilities, reasoning abilities and background knowledge to get the answer right. It involves a coreference resolution task in which a machine is given a sentence containing a situation which involves two entities, one pronoun and some more information about the situation and the machine has to come up with the right …

Contributors
Budukh, Tejas Ulhas, Baral, Chitta, Vanlehn, Kurt, et al.
Created Date
2013

Biological organisms are made up of cells containing numerous interconnected biochemical processes. Diseases occur when normal functionality of these processes is disrupted, manifesting as disease symptoms. Thus, understanding these biochemical processes and their interrelationships is a primary task in biomedical research and a prerequisite for activities including diagnosing diseases and drug development. Scientists studying these interconnected processes have identified various pathways involved in drug metabolism, diseases, and signal transduction, etc. High-throughput technologies, new algorithms and speed improvements over the last decade have resulted in deeper knowledge about biological systems, leading to more refined pathways. Such pathways tend to be large …

Contributors
Anwar, Saadat, Baral, Chitta, Inoue, Katsumi, et al.
Created Date
2014

Current work in planning assumes that user preferences and/or domain dynamics are completely specified in advance, and aims to search for a single solution plan to satisfy these. In many real world scenarios, however, providing a complete specification of user preferences and domain dynamics becomes a time-consuming and error-prone task. More often than not, a user may provide no knowledge or at best partial knowledge of her preferences with respect to a desired plan. Similarly, a domain writer may only be able to determine certain parts, not all, of the model of some actions in a domain. Such modeling issues …

Contributors
Nguyen, Tuan Anh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014

As robotic technology and its various uses grow steadily more complex and ubiquitous, humans are coming into increasing contact with robotic agents. A large portion of such contact is cooperative interaction, where both humans and robots are required to work on the same application towards achieving common goals. These application scenarios are characterized by a need to leverage the strengths of each agent as part of a unified team to reach those common goals. To ensure that the robotic agent is truly a contributing team-member, it must exhibit some degree of autonomy in achieving goals that have been delegated to …

Contributors
Talamadupula, Kartik, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014

Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However, most of the research in Question Answering aims at factual questions rather than deep ones such as ``How'' and ``Why'' questions. In this dissertation, I suggest a different approach in tackling this problem. We believe that the answers of deep questions need to be formally defined before found. Because these answers must be defined based on something, it is better …

Contributors
Vo, Nguyen Ha, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2015

For the past three decades, the design of an effective strategy for generating poetry that matches that of a human’s creative capabilities and complexities has been an elusive goal in artificial intelligence (AI) and natural language generation (NLG) research, and among linguistic creativity researchers in particular. This thesis presents a novel approach to fixed verse poetry generation using neural word embeddings. During the course of generation, a two layered poetry classifier is developed. The first layer uses a lexicon based method to classify poems into types based on form and structure, and the second layer uses a supervised classification method …

Contributors
Magge Ranganatha, Arjun, Syrotiuk, Violet R, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2016

Answer Set Programming (ASP) is one of the main formalisms in Knowledge Representation (KR) that is being widely applied in a large number of applications. While ASP is effective on Boolean decision problems, it has difficulty in expressing quantitative uncertainty and probability in a natural way. Logic Programs under the answer set semantics and Markov Logic Network (LPMLN) is a recent extension of answer set programs to overcome the limitation of the deterministic nature of ASP by adopting the log-linear weight scheme of Markov Logic. This thesis investigates the relationships between LPMLN and two other extensions of ASP: weak constraints …

Contributors
Yang, Zhun, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2017

In recent years, several methods have been proposed to encode sentences into fixed length continuous vectors called sentence representation or sentence embedding. With the recent advancements in various deep learning methods applied in Natural Language Processing (NLP), these representations play a crucial role in tasks such as named entity recognition, question answering and sentence classification. Traditionally, sentence vector representations are learnt from its constituent word representations, also known as word embeddings. Various methods to learn the distributed representation (embedding) of words have been proposed using the notion of Distributional Semantics, i.e. “meaning of a word is characterized by the company …

Contributors
Rath, Trideep, Baral, Chitta, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2017