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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Allocating tasks for a day's or week's schedule is known to be a challenging and difficult problem. The problem intensifies by many folds in multi-agent settings. A planner or group of planners who decide such kind of task association schedule must have a comprehensive perspective on (1) the entire array of tasks to be scheduled (2) idea on constraints like importance cum order of tasks and (3) the individual abilities of the operators. One example of such kind of scheduling is the crew scheduling done for astronauts who will spend time at International Space Station (ISS). The schedule for the …

Contributors
MIshra, Aditya Prasad, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Chiou, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2019

A critical challenge in the design of AI systems that operate with humans in the loop is to be able to model the intentions and capabilities of the humans, as well as their beliefs and expectations of the AI system itself. This allows the AI system to be "human- aware" -- i.e. the human task model enables it to envisage desired roles of the human in joint action, while the human mental model allows it to anticipate how its own actions are perceived from the point of view of the human. In my research, I explore how these concepts of …

Contributors
Chakraborti, Tathagata, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Talamadupula, Kartik, et al.
Created Date
2018

Humans and robots need to work together as a team to accomplish certain shared goals due to the limitations of current robot capabilities. Human assistance is required to accomplish the tasks as human capabilities are often better suited for certain tasks and they complement robot capabilities in many situations. Given the necessity of human-robot teams, it has been long assumed that for the robotic agent to be an effective team member, it must be equipped with automated planning technologies that helps in achieving the goals that have been delegated to it by their human teammates as well as in deducing …

Contributors
Narayanan, Vignesh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Zhang, Yu, et al.
Created Date
2015

Current work in planning assumes that user preferences and/or domain dynamics are completely specified in advance, and aims to search for a single solution plan to satisfy these. In many real world scenarios, however, providing a complete specification of user preferences and domain dynamics becomes a time-consuming and error-prone task. More often than not, a user may provide no knowledge or at best partial knowledge of her preferences with respect to a desired plan. Similarly, a domain writer may only be able to determine certain parts, not all, of the model of some actions in a domain. Such modeling issues …

Contributors
Nguyen, Tuan Anh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014