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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Research indicates that adults are not acquiring enough physical activity. Increasing the use of stairs is an accessible way to weave high intensity physical activity into the daily routine. The purpose of this study is to test the effect of four environmental changes on ascending stair use in a mixed population of college students, faulty, and staff on a southwest college campus. The study design included a 10-week time series design with alternating baseline and intervention phases, including a directional cue represented by footprints on the ground, a positive prompt, a deterrent prompt and a combination phase. Data was collected …

Contributors
Ford, Marley Rae, Adams, Marc, Der Ananian, Cheryl, et al.
Created Date
2015

Research provides increasing support of self-worth, non-physical motives, and body image for predicting physical activity in women. However, no empirical tests of these associations have been conducted. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) has been recognized as useful for understanding correlates of physical activity. This study tested the feasibility of a novel EMA protocol and explored temporal relationships between daily self-worth and physical activity in middle-aged women. Women aged 35-64 years (N=63; M age=49.2±8.2 years) received text message prompts to an Internet-based mobile survey three times daily for 28 days. The survey assessed momentary activity, self-worth (knowledge, emotional, social, physical, general), and …

Contributors
Ehlers, Diane K., Huberty, Jennifer L, Todd, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2014

Women are exposed to numerous endogenous and exogenous hormones across the lifespan. In the last several decades, the prescription of novel hormonal contraceptives and hormone therapies (HTs) have resulted in aging women that have a unique hormone exposure history; little is known about the impact of these hormone exposures on short- and long- term brain health. The goal of my dissertation was to understand how lifetime hormone exposures shape the female cognitive phenotype using several innovative approaches, including a new human spatial working memory task, the human radial arm maze (HRAM), and several rodent menopause models with variants of clinically …

Contributors
Mennenga, Sarah Elaine, Bimonte-Nelson, Heather, Aiken, Leona, et al.
Created Date
2015

PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify whether increased Pokémon GO use resulted in increased daily steps, compared to days when an individual did not play. In addition, this study examined Pokémon GO as a use case for for the study of gamification, particularly whether traditionally identified game mechanics in gamification literature were successfully identified as elements players enjoy when playing Pokémon GO. METHODS: A mixed methods approach, with 17 participants taking part in a daily physical activity tracking study and 14 participants participating in semi-structured interviews. In the use study, participant steps were tracked for one week using the Apple …

Contributors
Biel, Alexander Michael, Hekler, Eric, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2016

Research on the psychology of social power has shown how experiences of power tend to promote goal-oriented behavior and sexual perception in individuals. These experiences need not be generated through real-life power dynamics, but can be primed experimentally in the lab. A recent study has explored how power affects even lower level goal-oriented motor movement, showing how increased power facilitates the initiation of goal-oriented motor actions (Maner et al., 2010). However, this research did not explore how these goal-oriented motor movements promoted by power dynamically evolve over time, or can be influenced by sexual perceptual processes. Using an experimental paradigm …

Contributors
Gonzales, James Paul, Duran, Nicholas D, Hall, Deborah L, et al.
Created Date
2016

Social influences are important determinants of drug initiation in humans, particularly during adolescence and early adulthood. My dissertation tested three hypotheses: 1) conditioned and unconditioned nicotine and social rewards elicit unique patterns of neural signaling in the corticolimbic neurocircuitry when presented in combination versus individually; 2) play behavior is not necessary for expression of social reward; and 3) social context enhances nicotine self-administration. To test the first hypothesis, Fos protein was measured in response to social and nicotine reward stimuli given alone or in combination and in response to environmental cues associated with the rewards in a conditioned place preference …

Contributors
Peartree, Natalie Ann, Neisewander, Janet L, Conrad, Cheryl D, et al.
Created Date
2015

The most abundantly studied societies, with the exception of humans, are those of the eusocial insects, which include all ants. Eusocial insect societies are typically composed of many dozens to millions of individuals, referred to as nestmates, which require some form of communication to maintain colony cohesion and coordinate the activities within them. Nestmate recognition is the process of distinguishing between nestmates and non-nestmates, and embodies the first line of defense for social insect colonies. In ants, nestmate recognition is widely thought to occur through olfactory cues found on the exterior surfaces of individuals. These cues, called cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), …

Contributors
Cash, Elizabeth Irene, Gadau, Jürgen, Liebig, Jürgen, et al.
Created Date
2016

Real time project management has been underutilized as a tool to help youth grow personally and professionally. The thesis Real Time Project Management (PM) for Youth from Low Income Single Parent Households develops a study that seeks to result in a higher percentage of youth attending and completing college. The concept is to have youth from low income single parent households work as project managers each summer doing real time small projects for private companies. The youth would start at age 14 and conclude at age 18. They would do five summers of project management, managing small projects each summer …

Contributors
SHAPIRO, SETH, Sullivan, Kenneth, Stone, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2018

The study of lighting design has important implications for consumer behavior and is an important aspect of consideration for the retail industry. In today's global economy consumers can come from a number of cultural backgrounds. It is important to understand various cultures' perceptions of lighting design in order for retailers to better understand how to use lighting as a benefit to provide consumers with a desirable shopping experience. This thesis provides insight into the effects of ambient lighting on product perception among Americans and Middle Easterners. Both cultural groups' possess significant purchasing power in the worldwide market place. This research …

Contributors
Alsharhan, Dalal, Kroelinger, Michael, Eaton, John, et al.
Created Date
2013

The purpose of this study was to implement Tier 1 universal expectations and Tier 2 secondary preventions, using a School-wide Positive Behavior Supports (SWPBS) problem-solving framework with fidelity in a culturally and linguistically diverse urban elementary school. A mixed-method design was used to address the following three research questions. How can school leadership teams design and implement Tier 1 and Tier 2 supports with fidelity in an urban elementary school? In what ways can Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions, designed and created by a school leadership team, reduce disruptive student behaviors? How satisfied were staff members with implementation of …

Contributors
COLCORD, CEAN R., Mathur, Sarup R., Zucker, Stanley H., et al.
Created Date
2015