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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Women are exposed to numerous endogenous and exogenous hormones across the lifespan. In the last several decades, the prescription of novel hormonal contraceptives and hormone therapies (HTs) have resulted in aging women that have a unique hormone exposure history; little is known about the impact of these hormone exposures on short- and long- term brain health. The goal of my dissertation was to understand how lifetime hormone exposures shape the female cognitive phenotype using several innovative approaches, including a new human spatial working memory task, the human radial arm maze (HRAM), and several rodent menopause models with variants of clinically …

Contributors
Mennenga, Sarah Elaine, Bimonte-Nelson, Heather, Aiken, Leona, et al.
Created Date
2015

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic disease that affects 1.25 million people in the United States. There is no known cure and patients must self-manage the disease to avoid complications resulting from blood glucose (BG) excursions. Patients are more likely to adhere to treatments when they incorporate lifestyle preferences. Current technologies that assist patients fail to consider two factors that are known to affect BG: exercise and alcohol. The hypothesis is postprandial blood glucose levels of adult patients with T1D can be improved by providing insulin bolus or carbohydrate recommendations that account for meal and alcohol carbohydrates, glycemic excursion, …

Contributors
Groat, Danielle, Grando, Maria Adela, Kaufman, David, et al.
Created Date
2017