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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Enzymes which regulate the metabolic reactions for sustaining all living things, are the engines of life. The discovery of molecules that are able to control enzyme activity is of great interest for therapeutics and the biocatalysis industry. Peptides are promising enzyme modulators due to their large chemical diversity and the existence of well-established methods for library synthesis. Microarrays represent a powerful tool for screening thousands of molecules, on a small chip, for candidates that interact with enzymes and modulate their functions. In this work, a method is presented for screening high-density arrays to discover peptides that bind and modulate enzyme …

Contributors
Fu, Jinglin, Woodbury, Neal W, Johnston, Stephen A, et al.
Created Date
2010

Protein-surface interactions, no matter structured or unstructured, are important in both biological and man-made systems. Unstructured interactions are more difficult to study with conventional techniques due to the lack of a specific binding structure. In this dissertation, a novel approach is employed to study the unstructured interactions between proteins and heterogonous surfaces, by looking at a large number of different binding partners at surfaces and using the binding information to understand the chemistry of binding. In this regard, surface-bound peptide arrays are used as a model for the study. Specifically, in Chapter 2, the effects of charge, hydrophobicity and length …

Contributors
Wang, Wei, Woodbury, Neal W, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2014