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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




In an effort to begin validating the large number of discovered candidate biomarkers, proteomics is beginning to shift from shotgun proteomic experiments towards targeted proteomic approaches that provide solutions to automation and economic concerns. Such approaches to validate biomarkers necessitate the mass spectrometric analysis of hundreds to thousands of human samples. As this takes place, a serendipitous opportunity has become evident. By the virtue that as one narrows the focus towards "single" protein targets (instead of entire proteomes) using pan-antibody-based enrichment techniques, a discovery science has emerged, so to speak. This is due to the largely unknown context in which …

Contributors
Oran, Paul, Nelson, Randall, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2011

Cancer claims hundreds of thousands of lives every year in US alone. Finding ways for early detection of cancer onset is crucial for better management and treatment of cancer. Thus, biomarkers especially protein biomarkers, being the functional units which reflect dynamic physiological changes, need to be discovered. Though important, there are only a few approved protein cancer biomarkers till date. To accelerate this process, fast, comprehensive and affordable assays are required which can be applied to large population studies. For this, these assays should be able to comprehensively characterize and explore the molecular diversity of nominally "single" proteins across populations. …

Contributors
Rai, Samita, Nelson, Randall, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2012

X-ray diffraction is the technique of choice to determine the three-dimensional structures of proteins. In this study it has been applied to solve the structure of the survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins, the Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) from Pelodictyon phaeum (Pld. phaeum) protein, and the synthetic ATP binding protein DX. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in muscle atrophy and paralysis via degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. In this work, we used X-ray diffraction technique to solve the structures of the three variant of the of SMN protein, namely SMN 1-4, SMN-WT, and SMN-Δ7. …

Contributors
Seng, Chenda Ouk, Allen, James P., Wachter, Rebekka, et al.
Created Date
2013

Rapid and reliable separation and analysis of proteins require powerful analytical methods. The analysis of proteins becomes especially challenging when only small sample volumes are available, concomitantly with low concentrations of proteins. Time critical situations pose additional challenges. Due to these challenges, conventional macro-scale separation techniques reach their limitations. While microfluidic devices require only pL-nL sample volumes, they offer several advantages such as speed, efficiency, and high throughput. This work elucidates the capability to manipulate proteins in a rapid and reliable manner with a novel migration technique, namely dielectrophoresis (DEP). Since protein analysis can often be achieved through a combination …

Contributors
Nakano, Asuka, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014

Biological fluids contain information-rich mixtures of biochemicals and particles such as cells, proteins, and viruses. Selective and sensitive analysis of these fluids can enable clinicians to accurately diagnose a wide range of pathologies. Fluid samples such as these present an intriguing challenge to researchers; they are packed with potentially vital information, but notoriously difficult to analyze. Rapid and inexpensive analysis of blood and other bodily fluids is a topic gaining substantial attention in both science and medicine. Current limitations to many analyses include long culture times, expensive reagents, and the need for specialized laboratory facilities and personnel. Improving these tests …

Contributors
Jones, Paul Vernon, Hayes, Mark, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2015

Efficient separation techniques for organelles and bacteria in the micron- and sub-micron range are required for various analytical challenges. Mitochondria have a wide size range resulting from the sub-populations, some of which may be associated with diseases or aging. However, traditional methods can often not resolve within-species size variations. Strategies to separate mitochondrial sub-populations by size are thus needed to study the importance of this organelle in cellular functions. Additionally, challenges also exist in distinguishing the sub-populations of bio-species which differ in the surface charge while possessing similar size, such as Salmonella typhimurium (Salmonella). The surface charge of Salmonella wild-type …

Contributors
Luo, Jinghui, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

Nature is a master at organizing biomolecules in all intracellular processes, and researchers have conducted extensive research to understand the way enzymes interact with each other through spatial and orientation positioning, substrate channeling, compartmentalization, and more. DNA nanostructures of high programmability and complexity provide excellent scaffolds to arrange multiple molecular/macromolecular components at nanometer scale to construct interactive biomolecular complexes and networks. Due to the sequence specificity at different positions of the DNA origami nanostructures, spatially addressable molecular pegboard with a resolution of several nm (less than 10 nm) can be achieved. So far, DNA nanostructures can be used to build …

Contributors
Yang, Yuhe Renee, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Accurate virus detection is important for diagnosis in a timely manner to facilitate rapid interventions and treatments. RNA viruses affect an extensive amount of the world’s population, particularly in tropical countries where emerging infectious agents often arise. Current diagnostic methods have three main problems: they are time consuming, typically not field-portable, and expensive. My research goal is to develop rapid, field-portable and cost sensitive diagnostic methods for RNA viruses. Herein, two different approaches to detect RNA viruses were proposed: Conjugated gold nanoparticles for detection of viral particles or virus-specific antibodies by monitoring changes in their optical properties, and Tentacle Probes …

Contributors
Franco, Lina Stella, Mujica, Vladimiro, Blattman, Joseph N, et al.
Created Date
2016

Glycans are monosaccharide-based heteropolymers that are found covalently attached to many different proteins and lipids and are ubiquitously displayed on the exterior surfaces of cells. Serum glycan composition and structure are well known to be altered in many different types of cancer. In fact, glycans represent a promising but only marginally accessed source of cancer markers. The approach used in this dissertation, which is referred to as “glycan node analysis”, is a molecularly bottom-up approach to plasma/serum (P/S) glycomics based on glycan linkage analysis that captures features such as α2-6 sialylation, β1-6 branching, and core fucosylation as single analytical signals. …

Contributors
Roshdiferdosi, Shadi, Borges, Chad R, Woodbury, Neal, et al.
Created Date
2018