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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Solar energy is a promising alternative for addressing the world's current and future energy requirements in a sustainable way. Because solar irradiation is intermittent, it is necessary to store this energy in the form of a fuel so it can be used when required. The light-driven splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen (a useful chemical fuel) is a fascinating theoretical and experimental challenge that is worth pursuing because the advance of the knowledge that it implies and the availability of water and sunlight. Inspired by natural photosynthesis and building on previous work from our laboratory, this dissertation focuses on …

Contributors
Mendez-Hernandez, Dalvin D., Moore, Ana L, Mujica, Vladimiro, et al.
Created Date
2014

Time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging method that allows for structural discovery to be performed on biomacromolecules during their dynamic trajectory through a reaction pathway after activation. This is performed by triggering a reaction on an ensemble of molecules in nano- or microcrystals and then using femtosecond X-ray laser pulses produced by an X-ray free electron laser to collect near-instantaneous data on the crystal. A full data set can be collected by merging a sufficient number of these patterns together and multiple data sets can be collected at different points along the reaction pathway by manipulating the delay time …

Contributors
Coe, Jesse, Fromme, Petra, Sayres, Scott, et al.
Created Date
2018

This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon’s tunneling model is …

Contributors
Khezr Seddigh Mazinani, Shobeir, Mujica, Vladimiro, Pilarisetty, Tarakeshwar, et al.
Created Date
2015

We studied the relationship between the polarizability and the molecular conductance that arises in the response of a molecule to an external electric field. To illustrate the plausibility of the idea, we used Simmons' tunneling model, which describes image charge and dielectric effects on electron transport through a barrier. In such a model, the barrier height depends on the dielectric constant of the electrode-molecule-electrode junction, which in turn can be approximately expressed in terms of the molecular polarizability via the classical Clausius-Mossotti relation. In addition to using the tunneling model, the validity of the relationships between the molecular polarizability and …

Contributors
Vatan Meidanshahi, Reza, Mujica, Vladimiro, Chizmeshya, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2014

Sunlight, the most abundant source of energy available, is diffuse and intermittent; therefore it needs to be stored in chemicals bonds in order to be used any time. Photosynthesis converts sunlight into useful chemical energy that organisms can use for their functions. Artificial photosynthesis aims to use the essential chemistry of natural photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and convert it into fuels such as hydrogen gas. By splitting water, tandem photoelectrochemical solar cells (PESC) can produce hydrogen gas, which can be stored and used as fuel. Understanding the mechanisms of photosynthesis, such as photoinduced electron transfer, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) …

Contributors
Tejeda Ferrari, Marely Estefania, Moore, Ana, Mujica, Vladimiro, et al.
Created Date
2016