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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles present in eukaryotic cells. Energy as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is produced at the end of a series of electron transfers called the electron transport chain (ETC). Such a highly coordinated and regulated series of electron transfer reactions give rise to a small percentage of electron leakage which, by the subsequent reduction of molecular oxygen, produce superoxide anions (O2.-). These anions initiate the production of additional highly reactive oxygen-containing radicals commonly known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although cells are equipped with endogenous antioxidant systems to minimize ROS accumulation, these endogenous defense systems become inadequate when ROS …

Contributors
Bandyopadhyay, Indrajit, Hecht, Sidney M, Gould, Ian R, et al.
Created Date
2019

The manipulation of biological targets using synthetic compounds has been the focal point of medicinal chemistry. The work described herein centers on the synthesis of organic small molecules that act either as probes for studying protein conformational changes or DNA–protein interaction, or as multifunctional radical quenchers. Fluorescent labeling is of paramount importance to biological studies of proteins. For the development of new extrinsic small fluorophores, a series of tryptophan analogues has been designed and synthesized. Their pdCpA derivatives have been synthesized for tRNA activation and in vitro protein synthesis. The photophysical properties of the tryptophan (Trp) analogues have been examined, …

Contributors
TALUKDER, POULAMI, Hecht, Sidney M, Woodbury, Neal, et al.
Created Date
2016

The ability to manipulate the interaction between small molecules and biological macromolecules towards the study of disease pathogenesis has become a very important part of research towards treatment options for various diseases. The work described here shows both the use of DNA oligonucleotides as carriers for a nicotine hapten small molecule, and the use of microsomes to study the stability of compounds derived to treat mitochondrial diseases. Nicotine addiction is a worldwide epidemic because nicotine is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It is linked to early death, typically in the form of heart or lung disease. A …

Contributors
Schmierer, Margaret Louise, Hecht, Sidney M, Allen, James, et al.
Created Date
2016

Mitochondria produce the majority portion of ATP required in eukaryotic cells. ATP is generated through a process known as oxidative phosphorylation, through an pathway consisting five multi subunit proteins (complex I-IV and ATP synthase), embedded inside the mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction increases reactive oxygen species in the cell and causes several serious disorders. Described herein are the synthesis of antioxidant molecules to reduce the effects in an already dysfunctional system. Also described is the study of the mitochondrial electron transport chain to understand the mechanism of action of a library of antioxidants. Illustrated in chapter 1 is …

Contributors
Dey, Sriloy, Hecht, Sidney M, Angell, Charles A, et al.
Created Date
2015

Small molecules have proven to be very important tools for exploration of biological systems including diagnosis and treatment of lethal diseases like cancer. Fluorescent probes have been extensively used to further amplify the utilization of small molecules. The manipulation of naturally occurring biological targets with the help of synthetic compounds is the focus of the work described in this thesis. Bleomycins (BLMs) are a class of water soluble, glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics consisting of a structurally complicated unnatural hexapeptide and a disaccharide, clinically used as an anticancer chemotherapeutic agent at an exceptionally low therapeutic dose. The efficiency of BLM is likely …

Contributors
Bhattacharya, Chandrabali, Hecht, Sidney M, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2014

Mitochondria are crucial intracellular organelles which play a pivotal role in providing energy to living organisms in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) coupled with oxidative phosphorylation (OX-PHOS) transforms the chemical energy of amino acids, fatty acids and sugars to ATP. The mitochondrial electron transport system consumes nearly 90% of the oxygen used by the cell. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of superoxide anions (O2*-) are generated as byproduct of cellular metabolism due to leakage of electrons from complex I and complex III to oxygen. Under normal conditions, the effects of ROS …

Contributors
Alam, Mohammad Parvez, Hecht, Sidney M, Gould, Ian R, et al.
Created Date
2014

The communication of genetic material with biomolecules has been a major interest in cancer biology research for decades. Among its different levels of involvement, DNA is known to be a target of several antitumor agents. Additionally, tissue specific interaction between macromolecules such as proteins and structurally important regions of DNA has been reported to define the onset of certain types of cancers. Illustrated in Chapter 1 is the general history of research on the interaction of DNA and anticancer drugs, most importantly different congener of bleomycin (BLM). Additionally, several synthetic analogues of bleomycin, including the structural components and functionalities, are …

Contributors
Roy, Basab, Hecht, Sidney M, Jones, Anne, et al.
Created Date
2014

The ribosome is a ribozyme and central to the biosynthesis of proteins in all organisms. It has a strong bias against non-alpha-L-amino acids, such as alpha-D-amino acids and beta-amino acids. Additionally, the ribosome is only able to incorporate one amino acid in response to one codon. It has been demonstrated that reengineering of the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) of the ribosome enabled the incorporation of both alpha-D-amino acids and beta-amino acids into full length protein. Described in Chapter 2 are five modified ribosomes having modifications in the peptidyltrasnferase center in the 23S rRNA. These modified ribosomes successfully incorporated five different beta-amino …

Contributors
Maini, Rumit, Hecht, Sidney M, Gould, Ian, et al.
Created Date
2013

The bleomycins are a family of glycopeptide-derived antibiotics isolated from various Streptomyces species and have been the subject of much attention from the scientific community as a consequence of their antitumor activity. Bleomycin clinically and is an integral part of a number of combination chemotherapy regimens. It has previously been shown that bleomycin has the ability to selectively target tumor cells over their non-malignant counterparts. Pyrimidoblamic acid, the N-terminal metal ion binding domain of bleomycin is known to be the moiety that is responsible for O2 activation and the subsequent chemistry leading to DNA strand scission and overall antitumor activity. …

Contributors
Bozeman, Trevor, Hecht, Sidney M, Chaput, John, et al.
Created Date
2013

The biological and chemical diversity of protein structure and function can be greatly expanded by position-specific incorporation of non-natural amino acids bearing a variety of functional groups. Non-cognate amino acids can be incorporated into proteins at specific sites by using orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pairs in conjunction with nonsense, rare, or 4-bp codons. There has been considerable progress in developing new types of amino acids, in identifying novel methods of tRNA aminoacylation, and in expanding the genetic code to direct their position. Chemical aminoacylation of tRNAs is accomplished by acylation and ligation of a dinucleotide (pdCpA) to the 3'-terminus of truncated …

Contributors
Nangreave, Ryan Christopher, Hecht, Sidney M, Yan, Hao, et al.
Created Date
2013