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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2019


Disease prevention and personalized treatment will be impacted by the continued integration of protein biomarkers into medical practice. While there are already numerous biomarkers used clinically, the detection of protein biomarkers among complex matrices remains a challenging problem. One very important strategy for improvements in clinical application of biomarkers is separation/preconcentration, impacting the reliability, efficiency and early detection. Electrophoretic exclusion can be used to separate, purify, and concentrate biomarkers. This counterflow gradient technique exploits hydrodynamic flow and electrophoretic forces to exclude, enrich, and separate analytes. The development of this technique has evolved onto an array-based microfluidic platform which offers a …

Contributors
Zhu, Fanyi, Hayes, Mark, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2019

Microfluidic systems have gained popularity in the last two decades for their potential applications in manipulating micro- and nano- particulates of interest. Several different microfluidics devices have been built capable of rapidly probing, sorting, and trapping analytes of interest. Microfluidics can be combined with separation science to address challenges of obtaining a concentrated and pure distinct analyte from mixtures of increasingly similar entities. Many of these techniques have been developed to assess biological analytes of interest; one of which is dielectrophoresis (DEP), a force which acts on polarizable analytes in the presence of a non-uniform electric fields. This method can …

Contributors
Crowther, Claire Victoria, Hayes, Mark A, Gile, Gillian H, et al.
Created Date
2018

Microfluidics has shown great potential in rapid isolation, sorting, and concentration of bioparticles upon its discovery. Over the past decades, significant improvements have been made in device fabrication techniques and microfluidic methodologies. As a result, considerable microfluidic-based isolation and concentration techniques have been developed, particularly for rapid pathogen detection. Among all microfluidic techniques, dielectrophoresis (DEP) is one of the most effective and efficient techniques to quickly isolate and separate polarizable particles under inhomogeneous electric field. To date, extensive studies have demonstrated that DEP devices are able to precisely manipulate cells ranging from over 10 μm (mammalian cells) down to about …

Contributors
Ding, Jie, Hayes, Mark A, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2017

Cell heterogeneity is widely present in the biological world and exists even in an isogenic population. Resolving the protein heterogeneity at the single cell level is of enormous biological and clinical relevance. However, single cell protein analysis has proven to be challenging due to extremely low amount of protein in a single cell and the huge complexity of proteome. This requires appropriate sampling and sensitive detection techniques. Here, a new approach, microfluidics combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was brought forward, for the analysis of proteins in single cells. The detection sensitivity of peptides as low as 300 molecules and of …

Contributors
Yang, Mian, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2016

X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method to determine the structure of proteins, providing an understanding of their functions in all aspects of life to advance applications in fields such as drug development and renewable energy. New techniques, namely serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), have unlocked the ability to unravel the structures of complex proteins with vital biological functions. A key step and major bottleneck of structure determination is protein crystallization, which is very arduous due to the complexity of proteins and their natural environments. Furthermore, crystal characteristics govern data quality, thus need to be optimized to attain the most …

Contributors
Abdallah, Bahige Gary, Ros, Alexandra, Buttry, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2016

Serial crystallography (SX) is a relatively new structural biology technique that collects X-ray diffraction data from microcrystals via femtosecond pulses produced by an X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) or by synchrotron radiation, allowing for challenging protein structures to be solved from microcrystals at room temperature. Because of the youth of this technique, method development is necessary for it to achieve its full potential. Most serial crystallography experiments have relied on delivering sample in the mother liquor focused into a stream by compressed gas. This liquid stream moves at a fast rate, meaning that most of the valuable sample is wasted. …

Contributors
Conrad, Chelsie Elea, Fromme, Petra, Ros, Alexandra, et al.
Created Date
2016

Efficient separation techniques for organelles and bacteria in the micron- and sub-micron range are required for various analytical challenges. Mitochondria have a wide size range resulting from the sub-populations, some of which may be associated with diseases or aging. However, traditional methods can often not resolve within-species size variations. Strategies to separate mitochondrial sub-populations by size are thus needed to study the importance of this organelle in cellular functions. Additionally, challenges also exist in distinguishing the sub-populations of bio-species which differ in the surface charge while possessing similar size, such as Salmonella typhimurium (Salmonella). The surface charge of Salmonella wild-type …

Contributors
Luo, Jinghui, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

DNA and DNA nanoassemblies such as DNA origamis have large potential in biosensing, drug delivery, nanoelectronic circuits, and biological computing requiring suitable methods for migration and precise positioning. Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) provides an efficient and matrix-free approach for manipulation of micro-and nanometer-sized objects. In order to exploit iDEP for naturally formed DNA and DNA nanoassemblies, a detailed understanding of the underlying polarization and dielectrophoretic migration is essential. The shape and the counterion distribution are considered two essential factors in the polarization mechanism. Here, the dielectrophoretic behavior of 6-helix bundle (6HxB) and triangle DNA origamis with identical sequences but substantial topological …

Contributors
Gan, Lin, Ros, Alexandra, Buttry, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2015

The AAA+ ATPase Rubisco activase (Rca) regulates the activity of Rubisco, the photosynthetic enzyme responsible for catalyzing biological carbon fixation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Rca self-association controls Rubisco reactivation activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we are using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to better characterize the thermodynamics of the assembly process of cotton Rca. We present FCS data for Rca in the presence of Mg*ATPgS and Mg*ADP and for the D173N Walker B motif mutant in the presence of Mg*ATP. Our data are consistent with promotion and stabilization of hexamers by Mg*ATPgS and Mg*ATP, whereas Mg*ADP facilitates …

Contributors
Kuriata, Agnieszka Magdalena, Wachter, Rebekka, Redding, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2014

Rapid and reliable separation and analysis of proteins require powerful analytical methods. The analysis of proteins becomes especially challenging when only small sample volumes are available, concomitantly with low concentrations of proteins. Time critical situations pose additional challenges. Due to these challenges, conventional macro-scale separation techniques reach their limitations. While microfluidic devices require only pL-nL sample volumes, they offer several advantages such as speed, efficiency, and high throughput. This work elucidates the capability to manipulate proteins in a rapid and reliable manner with a novel migration technique, namely dielectrophoresis (DEP). Since protein analysis can often be achieved through a combination …

Contributors
Nakano, Asuka, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014