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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Guided by cognitive, socio-cognitive, and socio-cultural learning theories, large-scale studies over multiple semesters, multiple instructors and at two different institutions have been performed in order to understand the factors that contribute to student performance in general organic chemistry. Students’ cognitive abilities were assessed in a new way based on a categorization of problem types in a standard organic chemistry curriculum. Problem types that required higher cognitive load were found to be more predictive of overall course performance. However, student performance on high cognitive load problems was different when compared in terms of non-cognitive factors, e.g. whether they were pre-health students …

Contributors
Austin, Ara, Gould, Ian R., Atkinson, Robert K., et al.
Created Date
2018

A lack of adequate energy storage technologies is arguably the greatest hindrance to a modern sustainable energy infrastructure. Chemical energy storage, in the form of batteries, is an obvious solution to the problem. Unfortunately, today’s state of the art battery technologies fail to meet the desired metrics for full scale electric grid and/or electric vehicle role out. Considerable effort from scientists and engineers has gone into the pursuit of battery chemistries theoretically capable of far outperforming leading technologies like Li-ion cells. For instance, an anode of the relatively abundant and cheap metal, magnesium, would boost the specific energy by over …

Contributors
Watkins, Tylan Strike, Buttry, Daniel A, Wolf, George, et al.
Created Date
2016

Massive glycerol cluster ions with many charges (~ 106 Da, ~ ±100 charges) have been generated by electrospray to bombard biomolecules and biological sample surfaces. The low impact energy per nucleon facilitates intact sputtering and ionization of biomolecules which can be subsequently imaged. Various lipids, peptides and proteins have been studied. The primary cluster ion source has been coupled with an ion-microscope imaging mass spectrometer (TRIFT-1, Physical Electronics). A lateral resolution of ~3µm has been demonstrated, which is acceptable for sub-cellular imaging of animal cells (e.g. single cancer cell imaging in early diagnosis). Since the available amount of target molecules …

Contributors
Zhang, Jitao, Williams, Peter, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

Carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) present a unique opportunity for learning about the earliest organic chemistry that took place in our Solar System. The complex and diverse suite of meteoritic organic material is the result of multiple settings and physicochemical processes, including aqueous and thermal alteration. Though meteorites often inform origin-of-life discussions because they could have seeded early Earth with significant amounts of water and pre-biotic, organic material, their record of abiotic, aqueous, and organic geochemistry is of interest as well. CC materials previously resided on asteroidal parent bodies, relic planetesimals of Solar System formation which never accreted enough material to develop …

Contributors
Monroe, Adam Alexander, Pizzarello, Sandra, Williams, Peter, et al.
Created Date
2014

Mass spectrometric analysis requires that atoms from the sample be ionized in the gas phase. Secondary ion mass spectrometry achieves this by sputtering samples with an energetic primary ion beam. Several investigations of the sputtering and ionization process have been conducted. Oxygen is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to increase ion yields, but also can complicate the interpretation of SIMS analyses. An 18O implant in silicon has been used to quantify the oxygen concentration at the surface of sputtered silicon in order to study the dependence on oxygen of several sputtering and depth profile phenomena. The ion …

Contributors
Sobers Jr., Richard Carlisle, Williams, Peter, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2012

A new challenge on the horizon is to utilize the large amounts of protein found in the atmosphere to identify different organisms from which the protein originated. Included here is work investigating the presence of identifiable patterns of different proteins collected from the air and biological samples for the purposes of remote identification. Protein patterns were generated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Patterns created could identify high-traffic and low-traffic indoor spaces. Samples were collected from the air using air pumps to draw air through a filter paper trapping particulates, including large amounts of shed protein matter. In complimentary research …

Contributors
Staton, Sarah J. R., Hayes, Mark A, Hayes, Mark A, et al.
Created Date
2011