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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Most of the sunlight powering natural photosynthesis is absorbed by antenna arrays that transfer, and regulate the delivery of excitation energy to reaction centers in the chloroplast where photosynthesis takes place. Under intense sunlight the plants and certain organisms cannot fully utilize all of the sunlight received by antennas and excess redox species are formed which could potentially harm them. To prevent this, excess energy is dissipated by antennas before it reaches to the reaction centers to initiate electron transfer needed in the next steps of photosynthesis. This phenomenon is called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). The mechanism of NPQ is not …

Contributors
Bhushan, Kul, Gust, Devens, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2012

Mass spectrometric analysis requires that atoms from the sample be ionized in the gas phase. Secondary ion mass spectrometry achieves this by sputtering samples with an energetic primary ion beam. Several investigations of the sputtering and ionization process have been conducted. Oxygen is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to increase ion yields, but also can complicate the interpretation of SIMS analyses. An 18O implant in silicon has been used to quantify the oxygen concentration at the surface of sputtered silicon in order to study the dependence on oxygen of several sputtering and depth profile phenomena. The ion …

Contributors
Sobers Jr., Richard Carlisle, Williams, Peter, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2012

Rapid and reliable separation and analysis of proteins require powerful analytical methods. The analysis of proteins becomes especially challenging when only small sample volumes are available, concomitantly with low concentrations of proteins. Time critical situations pose additional challenges. Due to these challenges, conventional macro-scale separation techniques reach their limitations. While microfluidic devices require only pL-nL sample volumes, they offer several advantages such as speed, efficiency, and high throughput. This work elucidates the capability to manipulate proteins in a rapid and reliable manner with a novel migration technique, namely dielectrophoresis (DEP). Since protein analysis can often be achieved through a combination …

Contributors
Nakano, Asuka, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2014

Massive glycerol cluster ions with many charges (~ 106 Da, ~ ±100 charges) have been generated by electrospray to bombard biomolecules and biological sample surfaces. The low impact energy per nucleon facilitates intact sputtering and ionization of biomolecules which can be subsequently imaged. Various lipids, peptides and proteins have been studied. The primary cluster ion source has been coupled with an ion-microscope imaging mass spectrometer (TRIFT-1, Physical Electronics). A lateral resolution of ~3µm has been demonstrated, which is acceptable for sub-cellular imaging of animal cells (e.g. single cancer cell imaging in early diagnosis). Since the available amount of target molecules …

Contributors
Zhang, Jitao, Williams, Peter, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

Efficient separation techniques for organelles and bacteria in the micron- and sub-micron range are required for various analytical challenges. Mitochondria have a wide size range resulting from the sub-populations, some of which may be associated with diseases or aging. However, traditional methods can often not resolve within-species size variations. Strategies to separate mitochondrial sub-populations by size are thus needed to study the importance of this organelle in cellular functions. Additionally, challenges also exist in distinguishing the sub-populations of bio-species which differ in the surface charge while possessing similar size, such as Salmonella typhimurium (Salmonella). The surface charge of Salmonella wild-type …

Contributors
Luo, Jinghui, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2015

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an attractive building material for creating complex architectures at the nanometer scale that simultaneously affords versatility and modularity. Particularly, the programmability of DNA enables the assembly of basic building units into increasingly complex, arbitrary shapes or patterns. With the expanding complexity and functionality of DNA toolboxes, a quantitative understanding of DNA self-assembly in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics, will provide researchers with more subtle design guidelines that facilitate more precise spatial and temporal control. This dissertation focuses on studying the physicochemical properties of DNA tile-based self-assembly process by recapitulating representative scenarios and intermediate states …

Contributors
Jiang, Shuoxing, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

X-ray crystallography is the most widely used method to determine the structure of proteins, providing an understanding of their functions in all aspects of life to advance applications in fields such as drug development and renewable energy. New techniques, namely serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), have unlocked the ability to unravel the structures of complex proteins with vital biological functions. A key step and major bottleneck of structure determination is protein crystallization, which is very arduous due to the complexity of proteins and their natural environments. Furthermore, crystal characteristics govern data quality, thus need to be optimized to attain the most …

Contributors
Abdallah, Bahige Gary, Ros, Alexandra, Buttry, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2016

Cell heterogeneity is widely present in the biological world and exists even in an isogenic population. Resolving the protein heterogeneity at the single cell level is of enormous biological and clinical relevance. However, single cell protein analysis has proven to be challenging due to extremely low amount of protein in a single cell and the huge complexity of proteome. This requires appropriate sampling and sensitive detection techniques. Here, a new approach, microfluidics combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was brought forward, for the analysis of proteins in single cells. The detection sensitivity of peptides as low as 300 molecules and of …

Contributors
Yang, Mian, Ros, Alexandra, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2016

Nature is a master at organizing biomolecules in all intracellular processes, and researchers have conducted extensive research to understand the way enzymes interact with each other through spatial and orientation positioning, substrate channeling, compartmentalization, and more. DNA nanostructures of high programmability and complexity provide excellent scaffolds to arrange multiple molecular/macromolecular components at nanometer scale to construct interactive biomolecular complexes and networks. Due to the sequence specificity at different positions of the DNA origami nanostructures, spatially addressable molecular pegboard with a resolution of several nm (less than 10 nm) can be achieved. So far, DNA nanostructures can be used to build …

Contributors
Yang, Yuhe Renee, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Dust storms known as 'haboobs' occur in the City of Tempe, AZ during the North American monsoon season. A haboob classification method based on meteorological and air quality measurements is described. There were from 3 to 20 haboob events per year over the period from 2005 to 2014. The calculated annual TSP (total suspended particulate) dry deposition during haboobs is estimated to contribute 74% of the total particulate mass deposited in Tempe, AZ. Dry deposition is compared with the aqueous chemistry of Tempe Town Lake. Water management and other factors may have a stronger impact on Tempe Town Lake chemistry …

Contributors
Eagar, Jershon Dale, Herckes, Pierre, Hayes, Mark, et al.
Created Date
2016