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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Mime Type
  • application/pdf
Status
  • Public
Date Range
2011 2019


The increasing pervasiveness of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) is a major global health issue that has been further exacerbated by the dearth of antibiotics developed over the past 40 years. Drug-resistant bacteria have led to significant morbidity and mortality, and ever-increasing antibiotic resistance threatens to reverse many of the medical advances enabled by antibiotics over the last 40 years. The traditional strategy for combating these superbugs involves the development of new antibiotics. Yet, only two new classes of antibiotics have been introduced to the clinic over the past two decades, and both failed to combat broad spectrum gram-negative …

Contributors
Debnath, Abhishek, Green, Alexander A, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2019

DNA and RNA are generally regarded as one of the central molecules in molecular biology. Recent advancements in the field of DNA/RNA nanotechnology witnessed the success of usage of DNA/RNA as programmable molecules to construct nano-objects with predefined shapes and dynamic molecular machines for various functions. From the perspective of structural design with nucleic acid, there are basically two types of assembly method, DNA tile based assembly and DNA origami based assembly, used to construct infinite-sized crystal structures and finite-sized molecular structures. The assembled structure can be used for arrangement of other molecules or nanoparticles with the resolution of nanometers …

Contributors
Hong, Fan, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2019

Measurements of different molecular species from single cells have the potential to reveal cell-to-cell variations, which are precluded by population-based measurements. An increasing percentage of researches have been focused on proteins, for its central roles in biological processes. Immunofluorescence (IF) has been a well-established protein analysis platform. To gain comprehensive insights into cell biology and diagnostic pathology, a crucial direction would be to increase the multiplexity of current single cell protein analysis technologies. An azide-based chemical cleavable linker has been introduced to design and synthesis novel fluorescent probes. These probes allow cyclic immunofluorescence staining which leads to the feasibility of …

Contributors
Liao, Renjie, Guo, Jia, Borges, Chad, et al.
Created Date
2019

Ultrasonication-mediated liquid-phase exfoliation has emerged as an efficient method for producing large quantities of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides. This thesis explores the use of this process to produce a new class of boron-rich, two-dimensional materials, namely metal diborides, and investigate their properties using bulk and nanoscale characterization methods. Metal diborides are a class of structurally related materials that contain hexagonal sheets of boron separated by metal atoms with applications in superconductivity, composites, ultra-high temperature ceramics and catalysis. To demonstrate the utility of these materials, chromium diboride was incorporated in polyvinyl alcohol as a …

Contributors
Yousaf, Ahmed, Green, Alexander A, Wang, Qing Hua, et al.
Created Date
2018

Though DNA nanostructures (DNs) have become interesting subjects of drug delivery, in vivo imaging and biosensor research, however, for real biological applications, they should be ‘long circulating’ in blood. One of the crucial requirements for DN stability is high salt concentration (like ~5–20 mM Mg2+) that is unavailable in a cell culture medium or in blood. Hence DNs denature promptly when injected into living systems. Another important factor is the presence of nucleases that cause fast degradation of unprotected DNs. The third factor is ‘opsonization’ which is the immune process by which phagocytes target foreign particles introduced into the bloodstream. …

Contributors
Banerjee, Saswata, Yan, Hao, Angell, Austen, et al.
Created Date
2018

Nature is a master at organizing biomolecules in all intracellular processes, and researchers have conducted extensive research to understand the way enzymes interact with each other through spatial and orientation positioning, substrate channeling, compartmentalization, and more. DNA nanostructures of high programmability and complexity provide excellent scaffolds to arrange multiple molecular/macromolecular components at nanometer scale to construct interactive biomolecular complexes and networks. Due to the sequence specificity at different positions of the DNA origami nanostructures, spatially addressable molecular pegboard with a resolution of several nm (less than 10 nm) can be achieved. So far, DNA nanostructures can be used to build …

Contributors
Yang, Yuhe Renee, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an attractive building material for creating complex architectures at the nanometer scale that simultaneously affords versatility and modularity. Particularly, the programmability of DNA enables the assembly of basic building units into increasingly complex, arbitrary shapes or patterns. With the expanding complexity and functionality of DNA toolboxes, a quantitative understanding of DNA self-assembly in terms of thermodynamics and kinetics, will provide researchers with more subtle design guidelines that facilitate more precise spatial and temporal control. This dissertation focuses on studying the physicochemical properties of DNA tile-based self-assembly process by recapitulating representative scenarios and intermediate states …

Contributors
Jiang, Shuoxing, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2016

DNA and DNA nanoassemblies such as DNA origamis have large potential in biosensing, drug delivery, nanoelectronic circuits, and biological computing requiring suitable methods for migration and precise positioning. Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) provides an efficient and matrix-free approach for manipulation of micro-and nanometer-sized objects. In order to exploit iDEP for naturally formed DNA and DNA nanoassemblies, a detailed understanding of the underlying polarization and dielectrophoretic migration is essential. The shape and the counterion distribution are considered two essential factors in the polarization mechanism. Here, the dielectrophoretic behavior of 6-helix bundle (6HxB) and triangle DNA origamis with identical sequences but substantial topological …

Contributors
Gan, Lin, Ros, Alexandra, Buttry, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2015

Spider dragline silk is an outstanding biopolymer with a strength that exceeds steel by weight and a toughness greater than high-performance fibers like Kevlar. For this reason, structural and dynamic studies on the spider silk are of great importance for developing future biomaterials. The spider dragline silk comprises two silk proteins, Major ampullate Spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and 2), which are synthesized and stored in the major ampullate (MA) gland of spiders. The initial state of the silk proteins within Black Widow MA glands was probed with solution-state NMR spectroscopy. The conformation dependent chemical shifts information indicates that the …

Contributors
Xu, Dian, Yarger, Jeffery L, Holland, Gregory P, et al.
Created Date
2015

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has emerged as an excellent molecular building block for nanoconstruction in addition to its biological role of preserving genetic information. Its unique features such as predictable conformation and programmable intra- and inter-molecular Watson-Crick base pairing interactions make it a remarkable engineering material. A variety of convenient design rules and reliable assembly methods have been developed to engineer DNA nanostructures. The ability to create designer DNA architectures with accurate spatial control has allowed researchers to explore novel applications in directed material assembly, structural biology, biocatalysis, DNA computing, nano-robotics, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery. This dissertation focuses on developing …

Contributors
Zhang, Fei, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2015