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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Natural photosynthesis features a complex biophysical/chemical process that requires sunlight to produce energy rich products. It is one of the most important processes responsible for the appearance and sustainability of life on earth. The first part of the thesis focuses on understanding the mechanisms involved in regulation of light harvesting, which is necessary to balance the absorption and utilization of light energy and in that way reduce the effect caused by photooxidative damage. In photosynthesis, carotenoids are responsible not only for collection of light, but also play a major role in protecting the photosynthetic system. To investigate the role of …

Contributors
Pillai, Smitha Thulasi, Moore, Ana, Moore, Thomas, et al.
Created Date
2011

Most of the sunlight powering natural photosynthesis is absorbed by antenna arrays that transfer, and regulate the delivery of excitation energy to reaction centers in the chloroplast where photosynthesis takes place. Under intense sunlight the plants and certain organisms cannot fully utilize all of the sunlight received by antennas and excess redox species are formed which could potentially harm them. To prevent this, excess energy is dissipated by antennas before it reaches to the reaction centers to initiate electron transfer needed in the next steps of photosynthesis. This phenomenon is called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). The mechanism of NPQ is not …

Contributors
Bhushan, Kul, Gust, Devens, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2012

The work described in the thesis involves the synthesis of a molecular triad which is designed to undergo proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) upon irradiation with light. Photoinduced PCET is an important process that many organisms use and the elucidation of its mechanism will allow further understanding of this process and its potential applications. The target compound designed for PCET studies consists of a porphyrin chromophore (also a primary electron donor), covalently linked to a phenol-imidazole (secondary electron donor), and a C60 (primary electron acceptor). The phenol-imidazole moiety of this system is modeled after the TyrZ His-190 residues in the …

Contributors
Patterson, Dustin Day, Moore, Ana L, Gust, Devens, et al.
Created Date
2011

Sunlight, the most abundant source of energy available, is diffuse and intermittent; therefore it needs to be stored in chemicals bonds in order to be used any time. Photosynthesis converts sunlight into useful chemical energy that organisms can use for their functions. Artificial photosynthesis aims to use the essential chemistry of natural photosynthesis to harvest solar energy and convert it into fuels such as hydrogen gas. By splitting water, tandem photoelectrochemical solar cells (PESC) can produce hydrogen gas, which can be stored and used as fuel. Understanding the mechanisms of photosynthesis, such as photoinduced electron transfer, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) …

Contributors
Tejeda Ferrari, Marely Estefania, Moore, Ana, Mujica, Vladimiro, et al.
Created Date
2016