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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The China smog is a severe air pollution issue that has damaging effects on the health of millions of Chinese nationals and contributes to global warming. In the context of the China smog, this study examined civic engagement on social network sites (SNS) and in real life among Chinese nationals utilizing theories of uses and gratification, the effects of Internet use, media exposure, Internet censorship, political efficacy, trust and social capital. Six hundred and eighty eight Chinese nationals who are currently studying, working or residing in China completed online questionnaires. In general, the results of this study showed that a …

Contributors
Chen, Yashu, Cheong, Pauline, Guerrero, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2017

The purpose of this dissertation was to develop a Compassionate Communication Scale (CCS) by conducting a series of studies. The first study used qualitative data to identify and develop initial scale items. A series of follow-up studies used exploratory factor analysis to investigate the underlying structure of the CCS. A three-factor structure emerged, which included: Compassionate conversation, such as listening, letting the distressed person disclose feelings, and making empathetic remarks; compassionate touch, such as holding someone's hand or patting someone's back; and compassionate messaging, such as posting an encouraging message on a social networking site or sending a sympathetic email. …

Contributors
Ramos Salazar, Leslie, Guerrero, Laura, Roberto, Anthony, et al.
Created Date
2013

The goal of the present study was to test for links between experiences of red flags in initial interactions with romantic partners and later styles of relational conflict. Red flags are negative qualities or traits displayed by a potential romantic partner that trigger warnings in singles of possible future negative experiences if a romantic relationship develops. I focused on five red flags (displayed a lack of interest, evidenced narcissistic-like behavior, was too sexual, too possessive, or drank too much) and three conflict styles (mutual constructive style, demand/withdraw style, mutual avoidance style) in the current study. The 155 unmarried male undergraduates …

Contributors
Porter, Cami Kay, Christopher, F, Iida, Masumi, et al.
Created Date
2014

Relational turbulence theory (RTT) has primarily explored the effects of relational uncertainty and partner interdependence on relational outcomes. While robust, the theory fails to account for uncertainties and perceived interdependence stemming from extra-dyadic factors (such as partners’ social networks). Thus, this dissertation had two primary goals. First, scales indexing measures of social network-based relational uncertainty (i.e., network uncertainty) and social network interdependence are tested for convergent and divergent validity. Second, measurements of network uncertainty and interdependence are tested alongside measures featured in RTT to explore predictive validity. Results confirmed both measurements and demonstrated numerous significant relationships for turbulence variables. Discussions …

Contributors
Stein, James B., Mongeau, Paul A., Guerrero, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2018

Affectionate communication is one way individuals express love and appreciation (Floyd, 2006). Recently, communication scholars have recommended individuals increase their expressions of affection for health benefits (Brezsnyak & Whisman, 2004; Floyd et al., 2009; Floyd & Riforgiate, 2008). However, because communication is limited during military deployment, increasing affectionate communication is difficult for military families to implement. One form of affectionate communication that shows the promise of health benefits for military couples during deployment is affectionate writing. Working from Pennebaker’s written disclosure paradigm and Floyd’s affectionate exchange theory, the purpose of the current study is to identify whether at-home romantic partners …

Contributors
Veluscek, Alaina, Guerrero, Laura, Alberts, Jess, et al.
Created Date
2018

The relationships between goals and specific flirting behaviors were investigated in a college population. Research questions and hypotheses were guided by Dillard's (1990) Goals-Plans-Action (GPA) model of interpersonal influence, which states that goals lead to planning processes, which, in turn, produce behavior. Six hundred and eighty-five undergraduates at a large southwestern university participated in an online survey assessing their behaviors in their most recent flirting interactions, their goals for that interaction, as well as measures designed to assess planning, the importance of the goal, and the number of goals present for the interaction. Results indicate that goals relate to the …

Contributors
Wiedmaier, Benjamin, Mongeau, Paul, Guerrero, Laura, et al.
Created Date
2014

Same-sex couples establish and maintain relationships for many of the reasons heterosexuals do, even without widespread acceptance. The manner in which couples maintain their relationships constitutes a subject of considerable research, though such research has primarily examined heterosexuals. Yet, two studies have evaluated relational maintenance behaviors for same-sex couples and heterosexuals: Haas and Stafford (1998, 2005). Although these studies found similarities between heterosexual and homosexual relationships, significant differences emerged involving social networks and meta-relational talk. Haas and Stafford attributed these differences to the lack of societal and legal support. The present thesis examined empirically the link between perceived social approval, …

Contributors
Mcdonald, Patrick, Alberts, Jess K, Canary, Daniel J, et al.
Created Date
2011