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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Separation from a loved one is a highly stressful event. The range and intensity of emotions accompanying such a separation arguably are amplified when one's spouse deploys. This thesis examines at-home spouses (AHSs) of deployed military and how emotion, marital satisfaction, and communication are impacted throughout the deployment cycle. Additionally, I explore technology as a possible coping mechanism to help AHSs adapt and overcome stressfulness of deployment. One hundred sixty-six married females with a partner currently deployed, anticipating deployment, or recently returned from deployment completed an on-line survey. It was predicted AHSs would experience specific emotions during each phase, categorized …

Contributors
Powell, Katrina Danielle, Roberts, Nicole A., Burleson, Mary H., et al.
Created Date
2011

Sexual satisfaction has been positively linked to both individual and relational wellbeing (Christopher & Sprecher, 2000; Davison, Bell, LaChina, Holden, & Davis, 2009). Further, sexual communication has demonstrated positive impacts on sexual satisfaction (Byers, 2005); yet, research by MacNeil and Byers (2009) found that most people in romantic relationships do not share their sexual preferences with their partner. According to Tolman (2002), women seem to be especially reluctant to communicate sexually, due to the particular societal restrictions placed on expressions of female sexuality and desire. This study aims to understand how emerging adult women communicate with their sexual partners in …

Contributors
Farnworth, Megan Jacobs, Waldron, Vincent R, Feinstein, Brian A, et al.
Created Date
2019

ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a neurological condition that sometimes pervades all domains of an affected child's life. At school, three specific threats to the wellbeing of children with epilepsy exist: (1) seizure-related injuries, (2) academic problems, and (3) stigmatization. Unfortunately, educators frequently fail to take into account educationally-relevant epilepsy information when making important decisions. One possible explanation for this is that parents are not sharing such information with teachers. This study surveyed 16 parents of children with epilepsy in order to determine the rate at which they disclosed the epilepsy diagnoses to their children's teachers, as well as the difficulty with …

Contributors
Bush, Vanessa, Wodrich, David L, Wodrich, David L, et al.
Created Date
2011

Proponents of cues-filtered-out approaches to communication suggest that the quality of person-to-person interaction is diminished when that interaction is mediated by technology. This postulation has implications for communication given the surging popularity of text messaging in the United States. It is important to examine the degree to which text messaging may inhibit successful communication due to the detriments of technologically mediated communication. The relation between text messaging and romantic relationship satisfaction in individuals ages 18-45 was investigated because successful communication is widely known by researchers and lay individuals to be an integral aspect of healthy intimate relationships. The Relationship Assessment …

Contributors
Okonowsky, Lindsay, Tracey, Terence, Robinson-Kurpius, Sharon, et al.
Created Date
2016

Scholars have contemplated gender differences in negotiations for a number of years. Recently, attention has been directed to the early stages of a negotiation, particularly the propensity to initiate a negotiation. Indeed, there is evidence that men are significantly more likely than women to initiate a negotiation (Small, Gelfand, Babcock, & Gettman, 2007). In an effort to unpack these findings, the present mixed method study partially replicates the quantitative lab study by Small and her colleagues (2007) to explore gender differences and then extends this work with qualitative interviews to examine the rationales underlying the propensity to negotiate. In the …

Contributors
Leier, Cassaundra Renee, Alberts, Jess, Miller, Katherine, et al.
Created Date
2015