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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Software-defined radio provides users with a low-cost and flexible platform for implementing and studying advanced communications and remote sensing applications. Two such applications include unmanned aerial system-to-ground communications channel and joint sensing and communication systems. In this work, these applications are studied. In the first part, unmanned aerial system-to-ground communications channel models are derived from empirical data collected from software-defined radio transceivers in residential and mountainous desert environments using a small (< 20 kg) unmanned aerial system during low-altitude flight (< 130 m). The Kullback-Leibler divergence measure was employed to characterize model mismatch from the empirical data. Using this measure …

Contributors
Gutierrez, Richard, Bliss, Daniel W, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2018

Historically, wireless communication devices have been developed to process one specific waveform. In contrast, a modern cellular phone supports multiple waveforms corresponding to LTE, WCDMA(3G) and 2G standards. The selection of the network is controlled by software running on a general purpose processor, not by the user. Now, instead of selecting from a set of complete radios as in software controlled radio, what if the software could select the building blocks based on the user needs. This is the new software-defined flexible radio which would enable users to construct wireless systems that fit their needs, rather than forcing to use …

Contributors
Chagari, Vamsi Reddy, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Lee, Hyunseok, et al.
Created Date
2016

Object tracking is an important topic in multimedia, particularly in applications such as teleconferencing, surveillance and human-computer interface. Its goal is to determine the position of objects in images continuously and reliably. The key steps involved in object tracking are foreground detection to detect moving objects, clustering to enable representation of an object by its centroid, and tracking the centroids to determine the motion parameters. In this thesis, a low cost object tracking system is implemented on a hardware accelerator that is a warp based processor for SIMD/Vector style computations. First, the different foreground detection techniques are explored to figure …

Contributors
Sasikumar, Asha, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Ogras, Umit, et al.
Created Date
2015

Three dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is safe, inexpensive, and has been shown to drastically improve system ease-of-use, diagnostic efficiency, and patient throughput. However, its high computational complexity and resulting high power consumption has precluded its use in hand-held applications. In this dissertation, algorithm-architecture co-design techniques that aim to make hand-held 3-D ultrasound a reality are presented. First, image enhancement methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are proposed. These include virtual source firing techniques and a low overhead digital front-end architecture using orthogonal chirps and orthogonal Golay codes. Second, algorithm-architecture co-design techniques to reduce the power consumption of 3-D SAU imaging systems …

Contributors
Yang, Ming, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2015

Caches pose a serious limitation in scaling many-core architectures since the demand of area and power for maintaining cache coherence increases rapidly with the number of cores. Scratch-Pad Memories (SPMs) provide a cheaper and lower power alternative that can be used to build a more scalable many-core architecture. The trade-off of substituting SPMs for caches is however that the data must be explicitly managed in software. Heap management on SPM poses a major challenge due to the highly dynamic nature of of heap data access. Most existing heap management techniques implement a software caching scheme on SPM, emulating the behavior …

Contributors
Lin, Jinn-Pean, Shrivastava, Aviral, Ren, Fengbo, et al.
Created Date
2017

Coarse-grained Reconfigurable Arrays (CGRAs) are promising accelerators capable of accelerating even non-parallel loops and loops with low trip-counts. One challenge in compiling for CGRAs is to manage both recurring and nonrecurring variables in the register file (RF) of the CGRA. Although prior works have managed recurring variables via rotating RF, they access the nonrecurring variables through either a global RF or from a constant memory. The former does not scale well, and the latter degrades the mapping quality. This work proposes a hardware-software codesign approach in order to manage all the variables in a local nonrotating RF. Hardware provides modulo …

Contributors
Dave, Shail, Shrivastava, Aviral, Ren, Fengbo, et al.
Created Date
2016