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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Generating real-world content for VR is challenging in terms of capturing and processing at high resolution and high frame-rates. The content needs to represent a truly immersive experience, where the user can look around in 360-degree view and perceive the depth of the scene. The existing solutions only capture and offload the compute load to the server. But offloading large amounts of raw camera feeds takes longer latencies and poses difficulties for real-time applications. By capturing and computing on the edge, we can closely integrate the systems and optimize for low latency. However, moving the traditional stitching algorithms to battery …

Contributors
Gunnam, Sridhar, LiKamWa, Robert, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2018

Light field imaging is limited in its computational processing demands of high sampling for both spatial and angular dimensions. Single-shot light field cameras sacrifice spatial resolution to sample angular viewpoints, typically by multiplexing incoming rays onto a 2D sensor array. While this resolution can be recovered using compressive sensing, these iterative solutions are slow in processing a light field. We present a deep learning approach using a new, two branch network architecture, consisting jointly of an autoencoder and a 4D CNN, to recover a high resolution 4D light field from a single coded 2D image. This network decreases reconstruction time …

Contributors
Gupta, Mayank, Turaga, Pavan, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2017

Multi-sensor fusion is a fundamental problem in Robot Perception. For a robot to operate in a real world environment, multiple sensors are often needed. Thus, fusing data from various sensors accurately is vital for robot perception. In the first part of this thesis, the problem of fusing information from a LIDAR, a color camera and a thermal camera to build RGB-Depth-Thermal (RGBDT) maps is investigated. An algorithm that solves a non-linear optimization problem to compute the relative pose between the cameras and the LIDAR is presented. The relative pose estimate is then used to find the color and thermal texture …

Contributors
Krishnan, Aravindhan K., Saripalli, Srikanth, Klesh, Andrew, et al.
Created Date
2016

As a promising solution to the problem of acquiring and storing large amounts of image and video data, spatial-multiplexing camera architectures have received lot of attention in the recent past. Such architectures have the attractive feature of combining a two-step process of acquisition and compression of pixel measurements in a conventional camera, into a single step. A popular variant is the single-pixel camera that obtains measurements of the scene using a pseudo-random measurement matrix. Advances in compressive sensing (CS) theory in the past decade have supplied the tools that, in theory, allow near-perfect reconstruction of an image from these measurements …

Contributors
Lohit, Suhas Anand, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2015

Motion capture using cost-effective sensing technology is challenging and the huge success of Microsoft Kinect has been attracting researchers to uncover the potential of using this technology into computer vision applications. In this thesis, an upper-body motion analysis in a home-based system for stroke rehabilitation using novel RGB-D camera - Kinect is presented. We address this problem by first conducting a systematic analysis of the usability of Kinect for motion analysis in stroke rehabilitation. Then a hybrid upper body tracking approach is proposed which combines off-the-shelf skeleton tracking with a novel depth-fused mean shift tracking method. We proposed several kinematic …

Contributors
Du, Tingfang, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2012

High-level inference tasks in video applications such as recognition, video retrieval, and zero-shot classification have become an active research area in recent years. One fundamental requirement for such applications is to extract high-quality features that maintain high-level information in the videos. Many video feature extraction algorithms have been purposed, such as STIP, HOG3D, and Dense Trajectories. These algorithms are often referred to as “handcrafted” features as they were deliberately designed based on some reasonable considerations. However, these algorithms may fail when dealing with high-level tasks or complex scene videos. Due to the success of using deep convolution neural networks (CNNs) …

Contributors
Hu, Sheng-Hung, Li, Baoxin, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2016