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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Masters Thesis
Subject
Date Range
2011 2018


In today's data-driven world, every datum is connected to a large amount of data. Relational databases have been proving itself a pioneer in the field of data storage and manipulation since 1970s. But more recently they have been challenged by NoSQL graph databases in handling data models which have an inherent graphical representation. Graph databases with the ability to store physical relationships between two nodes and native graph processing technique have been doing exceptionally well in graph data storage and management for applications like recommendation engines, biological modeling, network modeling, social media applications, etc. Instructional Module Development System (IMODS) is …

Contributors
Saha, Abir Lal, Bansal, Srividya, Bansal, Ajay, et al.
Created Date
2017

The discussion board is a facet of online education that continues to confound students, educators, and researchers alike. Currently, the majority of research insists that instructors should structure and control online discussions as well as evaluate such discussions. However, the existing literature has yet to compare the various strategies that instructors have identified and employed to facilitate discussion board participation. How should instructors communicate their expectations online? Should instructors create detailed instructions that outline and model exactly how students should participate, or should generalized instructions be communicated? An experiment was conducted in an online course for undergraduate students at Arizona …

Contributors
Butler, Nicholas, Waldron, Vincent, Kassing, Jeffrey, et al.
Created Date
2012

Observational tutoring has been found to be an effective method for teaching a variety of subjects by reusing dialogue from previous successful tutoring sessions. While it has been shown content can be learned through observational tutoring it has yet to been examined if a secondary behavior such as goal-setting can be influenced. The present study investigated if observing virtual humans engaging in a tutoring session on rotational kinematics with embedded positive goal oriented dialogue would increase knowledge of the material and perpetuate a shift an observer's goal-orientation from performance avoidance goal orientation (PAVGO) to learning goal orientation (LGO). Learning gains …

Contributors
Twyford, Jessica Brooke, Craig, Scotty D, Niemczyk, Mary, et al.
Created Date
2014

Lots of previous studies have analyzed human tutoring at great depths and have shown expert human tutors to produce effect sizes, which is twice of that produced by an intelligent tutoring system (ITS). However, there has been no consensus on which factor makes them so effective. It is important to know this, so that same phenomena can be replicated in an ITS in order to achieve the same level of proficiency as expert human tutors. Also, to the best of my knowledge no one has looked at student reactions when they are working with a computer based tutor. The answers …

Contributors
Ranganathan, Rajagopalan, Vanlehn, Kurt, Atkinson, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2011

With the advent of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) educators have the opportunity to collect data from students and use it to derive insightful information about the students. Specifically, for programming based courses the ability to identify the specific areas or topics that need more attention from the students can be of immense help. But the majority of traditional, non-virtual classes lack the ability to uncover such information that can serve as a feedback to the effectiveness of teaching. In majority of the schools paper exams and assignments provide the only form of assessment to measure the success of the …

Contributors
Pandhalkudi Govindarajan, Sesha Kumar, Hsiao, I-Han, Nelson, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2016

In this action research, the need for high schools to embrace a pedagogical shift to teaching 21st century computer and online literacy skills is investigated. This study explored areas of secondary and higher education, technology usage, and online pedagogies, 21st century skill frameworks, and brain function as they pertain to learning and decision-making, with the aim of comprehending the differing high school levels of preparedness for college in regards to 21st century skills. Through literature reviews, a research was designed to further explore the specific areas of a discovered gap in high school students' 21st century skills for college. Pre- …

Contributors
Horn, Timothy, Patel, Mookesh, Giard, Jacques, et al.
Created Date
2015

Many English Language Learner (ELL) children struggle with knowledge of vocabulary and syntax. Enhanced Moved by Reading to Accelerate Comprehension in English (EMBRACE) is an interactive storybook application that teaches children to read by moving pictures on the screen to act out the sentences in the text. However, EMBRACE presents the same level of text to all users, and it is limited in its ability to provide error feedback, as it can only determine whether a user action is right or wrong. EMBRACE could help readers learn more effectively if it personalized its instruction with texts that fit their current …

Contributors
Wong, Audrey, Walker, Erin, Nelson, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2017

Computational thinking, the fundamental way of thinking in computer science, including information sourcing and problem solving behind programming, is considered vital to children who live in a digital era. Most of current educational games designed to teach children about coding either rely on external curricular materials or are too complicated to work well with young children. In this thesis project, Guardy, an iOS tower defense game, was developed to help children over 8 years old learn about and practice using basic concepts in programming. The game is built with the SpriteKit, a graphics rendering and animation infrastructure in Apple’s integrated …

Contributors
Wang, Xiaoxiao, Nelson, Brian C., Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Software engineering education today is a technologically advanced and rapidly evolving discipline. Being a discipline where students not only design but also build new technology, it is important that they receive a hands on learning experience in the form of project based courses. To maximize the learning benefit, students must conduct project-based learning activities in a consistent rhythm, or cadence. Project-based courses that are augmented with a system of frequent, formative feedback helps students constantly evaluate their progress and leads them away from a deadline driven approach to learning. One aspect of this research is focused on evaluating the use …

Contributors
Xavier, Suhas, Gary, Kevin A, Bansal, Srividya K, et al.
Created Date
2016

Assemblers and compilers provide feedback to a programmer in the form of error messages. These error messages become input to the debugging model of the programmer. For the programmer to fix an error, they should first locate the error in the program, understand what is causing that error, and finally resolve that error. Error messages play an important role in all three stages of fixing of errors. This thesis studies the effects of error messages in the context of teaching programming. Given an error message, this work investigates how it effects student’s way of 1) understanding the error, and 2) …

Contributors
Beejady Murthy Kadekar, Harsha Kadekar, Sohoni, Sohum, Craig, Scotty D, et al.
Created Date
2017

Multimedia educational technologies have increased their presence in traditional and online classrooms over the course of the previous decade. These tools hold value and can promote positive learning outcomes but are reliant on students’ degree of cognitive engagement and self-regulation. When students are not cognitively engaged or have low self-regulation capabilities, their interaction with the technology becomes less impactful because of decreased learning outcomes. Building or altering technologies to cognitively engage students is costly and timely; the present study investigates if introducing higher agency roles, to change the role of the student, increases learning outcomes. Specifically, this study investigates if …

Contributors
Novak, Kyrsten, Roscoe, Rod, Branaghan, Russell, et al.
Created Date
2018

For this master's thesis, a unique set of cognitive prompts, designed to be delivered through a teachable robotic agent, were developed for students using Tangible Activities for Geometry (TAG), a tangible learning environment developed at Arizona State University. The purpose of these prompts is to enhance the affordances of the tangible learning environment and help researchers to better understand how we can design tangible learning environments to best support student learning. Specifically, the prompts explicitly encourage users to make use of their physical environment by asking students to perform a number of gestures and behaviors while prompting students about domain-specific …

Contributors
Thomas, Elissa, Burleson, Winslow, Muldner, Katarzyna, et al.
Created Date
2014

Academia is not what it used to be. In today’s fast-paced world, requirements are constantly changing, and adapting to these changes in an academic curriculum can be challenging. Given a specific aspect of a domain, there can be various levels of proficiency that can be achieved by the students. Considering the wide array of needs, diverse groups need customized course curriculum. The need for having an archetype to design a course focusing on the outcomes paved the way for Outcome-based Education (OBE). OBE focuses on the outcomes as opposed to the traditional way of following a process [23]. According to …

Contributors
LNU, Vaishnavi Raj, Bansal, Srividya, Bansal, Ajay, et al.
Created Date
2018

Online discussion forums have become an integral part of education and are large repositories of valuable information. They facilitate exploratory learning by allowing users to review and respond to the work of others and approach learning in diverse ways. This research investigates the different comment semantic features and the effect they have on the quality of a post in a large-scale discussion forum. We survey the relevant literature and employ the key content quality identification features. We then construct comment semantics features and build several regression models to explore the value of comment semantics dynamics. The results reconfirm the usefulness …

Contributors
Aggarwal, Adithya, Hsiao, Ihan, Lopez, Claudia, et al.
Created Date
2016

Computational thinking, the creative thought process behind algorithmic design and programming, is a crucial introductory skill for both computer scientists and the population in general. In this thesis I perform an investigation into introductory computer science education in the United States and find that computational thinking is not effectively taught at either the high school or the college level. To remedy this, I present a new educational system intended to teach computational thinking called Genost. Genost consists of a software tool and a curriculum based on teaching computational thinking through fundamental programming structures and algorithm design. Genost's software design is …

Contributors
Walliman, Garret Greg, Atkinson, Robert, Chen, Yinong, et al.
Created Date
2015

Safe headway learning plays a core role in driving education. Traditional safe headway education just use the oral and literal methods to educate drivers the concept of safe headway time, while with the limitation of combining drivers subject and situational domains for drivers to learn. This study investigated that whether using ego-moving metaphor to embody driver's self-awareness can help to solve this problem. This study used multiple treatments (ego-moving and time-moving instruction of safe time headway) and controls with pretest experimental design to investigate the embody self-awareness effect in a car-following task. Drivers (N=40) were asked to follow a lead …

Contributors
Lu, Shaowen, Craig, Scotty D., Gray, Robort, et al.
Created Date
2016

In an effort to stress the benefits of the application of renewable energy to the next generation of science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) professionals, instructional modules on energy and biogas were integrated into a summer camp curriculum that challenged students to apply STEAM concepts in the design and development of chain reaction machines. Each module comprised an interactive presentations and a hands-on component where students operated a manipulative relevant to the content. During summer 2013, this camp was implemented at two high schools in Arizona and one in Trinidad and Tobago. Assessments showed that the overall modules were …

Contributors
Mccall, Shakira Renee, Dalrymple, Odesma O, Bradley, Rogers, et al.
Created Date
2014

Online programming communities are widely used by programmers for troubleshooting or various problem solving tasks. Large and ever increasing volume of posts on these communities demands more efforts to read and comprehend thus making it harder to find relevant information. In my thesis; I designed and studied an alternate approach by using interactive network visualization to represent relevant search results for online programming discussion forums. I conducted user study to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. Results show that users were able to identify relevant information more precisely via visual interface as compared to traditional list based approach. Network visualization …

Contributors
Mehta, Vishal Vimal, Hsiao, Ihan, Walker, Erin, et al.
Created Date
2015

Research in the learning sciences suggests that students learn better by collaborating with their peers than learning individually. Students working together as a group tend to generate new ideas more frequently and exhibit a higher level of reasoning. In this internet age with the advent of massive open online courses (MOOCs), students across the world are able to access and learn material remotely. This creates a need for tools that support distant or remote collaboration. In order to build such tools we need to understand the basic elements of remote collaboration and how it differs from traditional face-to-face collaboration. The …

Contributors
Nelakurthi, Arun Reddy, Pon-Barry, Heather, VanLehn, Kurt, et al.
Created Date
2014

Believe It! is an animated interactive computer program that delivers cognitive restructuring to adolescent females' irrational career beliefs. It challenges the irrational belief and offers more reasonable alternatives. The current study investigated the potentially differential effects of Asian versus Caucasian animated agents in delivering the treatment to young Chinese American women. The results suggested that the Asian animated agent was not significantly superior to the Caucasian animated agent. Nor was there a significant interaction between level of acculturation and the effects of the animated agents. Ways to modify the Believe It! program for Chinese American users were recommended. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Zhang, Xue (Yidan), Horan, John J, Homer, Judith, et al.
Created Date
2013

Learners' attitudes and beliefs during the initial stages of learning have a profound impact on their future decisions, practice habits, and persistence. In music education, however, surprisingly little research has explored how physical equipment design might influence novices' attitudes and beliefs. The current study addresses this gap by examining how novices' motivation and perception differ based on the physical design of the musical instrument they interact with while learning. Fifty-two adult participants completed an online survey measuring their expectancies (e.g., confidence), value beliefs (e.g., enjoyment, interest, and social merit), and anticipated persistence while attempting to learn the electric guitar. Afterward, …

Contributors
O'Brian, Joseph, Roscoe, Rod D, Branaghan, Russell J, et al.
Created Date
2016

The field of education has been immensely benefited by major breakthroughs in technology. The arrival of computers and the internet made student-teacher interaction from different parts of the world viable, increasing the reach of the educator to hitherto remote corners of the world. The arrival of mobile phones in the recent past has the potential to provide the next paradigm shift in the way education is conducted. It combines the universal reach and powerful visualization capabilities of the computer with intimacy and portability. Engineering education is a field which can exploit the benefits of mobile devices to enhance learning and …

Contributors
Ranganath, Suhas, Spanias, Andreas, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, et al.
Created Date
2013

Computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has made great inroads in classroom teaching marked by the use of tools and technologies to support and enhance collaborative learning. Computer mediated learning environments produce large amounts of data, capturing student interactions, which can be used to analyze students’ learning behaviors (Martinez-Maldonado et al., 2013a). The analysis of the process of collaboration is an active area of research in CSCL. Contributing towards this area, Meier et al. (2007) defined nine dimensions and gave a rating scheme to assess the quality of collaboration. This thesis aims to extract and examine frequent patterns of students’ interactions …

Contributors
Chaudhry, Rishabh, Walker, Erin A, Maldonado-Martinez, Roberto, et al.
Created Date
2015

This thesis is an initial test of the hypothesis that superficial measures suffice for measuring collaboration among pairs of students solving complex math problems, where the degree of collaboration is categorized at a high level. Data were collected in the form of logs from students' tablets and the vocal interaction between pairs of students. Thousands of different features were defined, and then extracted computationally from the audio and log data. Human coders used richer data (several video streams) and a thorough understand of the tasks to code episodes as collaborative, cooperative or asymmetric contribution. Machine learning was used to induce …

Contributors
Viswanathan, Sree Aurovindh, VanLehn, Kurt, T.H CHI, Michelene, et al.
Created Date
2014

Paper assessment remains to be an essential formal assessment method in today's classes. However, it is difficult to track student learning behavior on physical papers. This thesis presents a new educational technology—Web Programming Grading Assistant (WPGA). WPGA not only serves as a grading system but also a feedback delivery tool that connects paper-based assessments to digital space. I designed a classroom study and collected data from ASU computer science classes. I tracked and modeled students' reviewing and reflecting behaviors based on the use of WPGA. I analyzed students' reviewing efforts, in terms of frequency, timing, and the associations with their …

Contributors
Huang, Po-Kai, Hsiao, I-Han, Nelson, Brian, et al.
Created Date
2017

This study explores the influence of framing and activity type on expectations of learning and enjoyment as well as performance in a paraphrase identification task. In the first experiment, 80 students played one of three activities framed as either a "play" or "learning" task. Students then completed one of three activities; learning only, an educational game, or a play only activity. Results showed that the play frame had an effect on learning expectations prior to completing the activity, but had no effect after completing the activity. Students who completed the educational game scored significantly higher on the posttest learning assessment …

Contributors
Brandon, Russell Davis, Mcnamara, Danielle S., Jackson, George T., et al.
Created Date
2013

ABSTRACT Art educators use a variety of teaching and demonstration methods to convey information to students. With the emergence of digital technology, the standard methods of demonstration are changing. Art demonstrations are now being recorded and shared via the internet through video sharing websites such as YouTube. Little research has been conducted on the effectiveness of video demonstration versus the standard teacher-centered demonstration. This study focused on two different demonstration methods for the same clay sculpture project, with two separate groups of students. The control group received regular teacher-centered demonstration for instruction. The experimental group received a series of YouTube …

Contributors
Lee, Allison K., Erickson, Mary, Young, Bernard, et al.
Created Date
2013