Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Language
  • English
Mime Type
  • application/pdf
Subject
Date Range
2011 2020


Plagiarism is a huge problem in a learning environment. In programming classes especially, plagiarism can be hard to detect as source codes' appearance can be easily modified without changing the intent through simple formatting changes or refactoring. There are a number of plagiarism detection tools that attempt to encode knowledge about the programming languages they support in order to better detect obscured duplicates. Many such tools do not support a large number of languages because doing so requires too much code and therefore too much maintenance. It is also difficult to add support for new languages because each language is …

Contributors
Monroe, Zachary Lynn, Bansal, Ajay, Lindquist, Timothy, et al.
Created Date
2020

For more than 30 years, social science researchers have studied how students in online learning environments interact with each other. This has led to the development of a construct called social presence. Studies have shown that high social presence can lead to improved student retention, engagement, and satisfaction. The literature explores how social presence has been measured by faculty or researchers, but lacks insight on how other university staff can affect social presence in online graduate students. This is an action research mixed-methods study conducted by an academic advisor and attempts to measure social presence through a webpage intervention for …

Contributors
Delgado, Gina Michelle, Chen, Ying-Chih, Beardsley, Audrey, et al.
Created Date
2020

The science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education community is interested in using virtual reality (VR) to help students learn STEM knowledge. Prior research also provided evidence that VR learning can increase students’ motivation and learning achievement. However, it was not clear whether the effect of VR on learning was partly from sensory novelty and whether the effectiveness was sustainable. This study was to satisfy the concern on the sustainability of VR STEM learning in instruction and address the research gaps in exploring the effect of VR on a STEM learning experience with a consideration of novelty. The study used …

Contributors
huang, wen, Roscoe, Rod, Johnson, Mina, et al.
Created Date
2020

In the last decade, the immense growth of computational power, enhanced data storage capabilities, and the increasing popularity of online learning systems has led to adaptive learning systems becoming more widely available. Parallel to infrastructure enhancements, more researchers have started to study the adaptive task selection systems, concluding that suggesting tasks appropriate to students' needs may increase students' learning gains. This work built an adaptive task selection system for undergraduate organic chemistry students using a deep learning algorithm. The proposed model is based on a recursive neural network (RNN) architecture built with Long-Short Term Memory (LSTM) cells that recommends organic …

Contributors
KOSELER EMRE, Refika, VanLehn, Kurt A, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2020

Educational technologies can be great tools for learning. The implementation of learning aids and scaffolds within these technologies often make them effective; however, due to various problems, students may take more passive approaches to learning when using these educational tools. This tends to lead to interactions that impair learning. This study approaches this issue by reexamining the learner’s role when interacting with educational technologies. Specifically, the current study attempts to support learning and perceptions by inviting students to approach a learning task like an interface designer or instructional designer. These roles derive from a previous study on higher agency roles. …

Contributors
Arnold, Samuel Troy, Roscoe, Rod, Craig, Scotty, et al.
Created Date
2020

Clickers are a common part of many classrooms across universities. Despite the widespread use, education researchers disagree about how to best use these tools and about how they impact students. Prior work has shown possible differential impacts of clickers based on demographic indicators, such as age, gender, and ethnicity. To explore these topics a two-part project was designed. First, a literature review was completed focusing on past and current clicker practices and the research surrounding them. Second, original data, stratified by demographic characteristics, was collected on student perceptions of clickers. The literature review revealed that not all uses of clickers …

Contributors
Chambers, Elijah Lorenzo, Henderson, Joesph, Ellison, Karin, et al.
Created Date
2020

The purpose of this study was to increase microlearning training module usage and completions by 10–15% over a 30-day period by including evaluation in the design and development of a new microlearning training module in the golf equipment industry. Evaluation was conducted using a bespoke evaluation tool, which was designed and developed using design thinking methodology. The evaluation tool was applied to two previously designed microlearning modules, Driver Distance B and Driver Distance C, both of which served as comparisons for the new module’s completion data. Evaluation reports were generated that informed the development of the new module, named Golf …

Contributors
Regan, Elizabeth, Marsh, Josephine P, Leahy, Sean, et al.
Created Date
2020

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of virtual office hours in the online classroom on engagement and course completion among criminology students at Arizona State University. The study relied on an action research mixed-method design. The goal of the interventions was to increase the engagement of all members of the class. The study’s conceptual framework drew from Albert Bandura’s (1977) social learning theory that combines cognitive psychology and behaviorism to describe the learning process within individuals, as well as Garrison, Anderson, and Archer’s (2000) Community of Inquiry Framework, which is based on constructivist learning theory, …

Contributors
DeCarolis, Claudine, Gee, Betty, Mertler, Craig, et al.
Created Date
2020

Universities and colleges in the United States (U.S.) are in a period of rapid transformation. Driven by the need for an educated workforce, higher education institutions are responding to rapid innovation, globalization, economic realities, and sociodemographic shifts. Simultaneously, extensive educational online networks connect millions of people worldwide enable learning and knowledge sharing beyond what society has experienced to date. In light of technological advancements, the preservation and presentation of certain ideals that undergird academia and the communication and application of knowledge are undergoing dramatic change. Within higher education, this is both a challenge and an opportunity to re-envision the commitment …

Contributors
Hale, Anne Elizabeth, Archambault, Leanna, Johnston, Erik, et al.
Created Date
2020

In the last decade, the educational field, in general, has experienced increasing interest in applying augmented reality (AR) for educational purposes. Studies have shown that when AR is effectively applied in education, it can increase students’ learning interest and concentration (Zhang et al., 2014), reduce cognitive overload (Bower et al., 2014, p.1), and provide a more authentic learning experience (Klopfer, 2008). This study uses both cognitive and sociocultural theoretical perspectives to better understand the role of AR in peer interaction by investigating language-related episodes (LREs) during collaborative dialogue. The current study investigates whether mobile-based AR influence the number, nature, outcome, …

Contributors
Domaz, Silvana, Lafford, Barbara, Smith, Bryan, et al.
Created Date
2020