Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is an attractive II-VI compound semiconductor with a direct bandgap of 2.26 eV that is used in many applications in optoelectronic devices. Compared to the two dimensional (2D) thin-film semiconductors, one-dimensional (1D) nanowires can have different electronic properties for potential novel applications. In this work, we present the study of ZnTe nanowires (NWs) that are synthesized through a simple vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. By controlling the presence or the absence of Au catalysts and controlling the growth parameters such as growth temperature, various growth morphologies of ZnTe, such as thin films and nanowires can be obtained. The characterization …

Contributors
Peng, Jhih-Hong, Yu, Hongbin, Roedel, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2017

In this thesis, a novel silica nanosphere (SNS) lithography technique has been developed to offer a fast, cost-effective, and large area applicable nano-lithography approach. The SNS can be easily deposited with a simple spin-coating process after introducing a N,N-dimethyl-formamide (DMF) solvent which can produce a highly close packed SNS monolayer over large silicon (Si) surface area, since DMF offers greatly improved wetting, capillary and convective forces in addition to slow solvent evaporation rate. Since the period and dimension of the surface pattern can be conveniently changed and controlled by introducing a desired size of SNS, and additional SNS size reduction …

Contributors
Choi, Jeayoung, Honsberg, Christiana, Alford, Terry, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation research has involved microscopic characterization of magnetic nanostructures using off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy. The nanostructures investigated have included Co nanoparticles (NPs), Au/Fe/GaAs shell/core nanowires (NWs), carbon spirals with magnetic cores, magnetic nanopillars, Ni-Zn-Co spinel ferrite and CoFe/Pd multilayers. The studies have confirmed the capability of holography to describe the behavior of magnetic structures at the nanoscale. The phase changes caused by the fringing fields of chains consisting of Co NPs were measured and calculated. The difference between chains with different numbers of Co NPs followed the trend indicated by calculations. Holography studies of Au/Fe/GaAs NWs grown …

Contributors
Zhang, Desai, McCartney, Martha R, Smith, David J, et al.
Created Date
2015

This research focuses on the stress and structure evolution observed in-situ during the earliest stages of thin film growth in Cu on Au(111)-reconstruction. For the research, an ultra high vacuum-scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) system was modified to have the additional capabilities of in-situ deposition and in-situ stress evolution monitoring. The design and fabrication processes for the modifications are explained in detail. The deposition source enabled imaging during the deposition of Cu thin films, while also being columnar enough to avoid negatively impacting the function of the microscope. It was found that the stress-induced changes in piezo voltage occurred over a …

Contributors
Nah, Jungwoo, Friesen, Cody, Sieradzki, Karl, et al.
Created Date
2012

A primary motivation of research in photovoltaic technology is to obtain higher efficiency photovoltaic devices at reduced cost of production so that solar electricity can be cost competitive. The majority of photovoltaic technologies are based on p-n junction, with efficiency potential being much lower than the thermodynamic limits of individual technologies and thereby providing substantial scope for further improvements in efficiency. The thesis explores photovoltaic devices using new physical processes that rely on thin layers and are capable of attaining the thermodynamic limit of photovoltaic technology. Silicon heterostructure is one of the candidate technologies in which thin films induce a …

Contributors
Ghosh, Kunal, Bowden, Stuart, Honsberg, Christiana, et al.
Created Date
2011