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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Language
  • English
Subject
Date Range
2012 2018


The purpose of this study was to collect specific data concerning the use of financial resources from extant adult community bands that are members of the Association of Concerts Bands (ACB). An adult community band is defined as an ensemble consisting primarily of amateur adult woodwind, brass, and percussion performers, the majority of whom are not satisfying school, college, or military requirements through participation. This investigation comprises two main parts: 1) a perusal of the development of adult community bands within the overall history of bands in the United States, including, when possible, financial aspects of their operations; and 2) …

Contributors
Raya, Bryan, Hill, Gary, Caslor, Jason, et al.
Created Date
2017

Merton (1987) predicts that idiosyncratic risk can be priced. I develop a simple equilibrium model of capital markets with information costs in which the idiosyncratic risk premium depends on the average level of idiosyncratic volatility. This dependence suggests that the idiosyncratic risk premium varies over time. I find that in U.S. markets, the covariance between stock-level idiosyncratic volatility and the idiosyncratic risk premium explains future stock returns. Stocks in the highest quintile of the covariance between the volatility and risk premium earn an average 3-factor alpha of 70 bps per month higher than those in the lowest quintile. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Xie, Daruo, Wahal, Sunil, Mehra, Rajnish, et al.
Created Date
2015

This paper examines how equity analysts' roles as information intermediaries and monitors affect corporate liquidity policy and its associated value of cash, providing new evidence that analysts have a direct impact on corporate liquidity policy. Greater analyst coverage (1) reduces information asymmetry between a firm and outside shareholders and (2) enhances the monitoring process. Consistent with these arguments, analyst coverage increases the value of cash, thereby allowing firms to hold more cash. The cash-to-assets ratio increases by 5.2 percentage points when moving from the bottom analyst-coverage decile to the top decile. The marginal value of $1 of corporate cash holdings …

Contributors
Chang, Ching-Hung, Bates, Thomas, Bharath, Sreedhar, et al.
Created Date
2012

The purpose of this research is to efficiently analyze certain data provided and to see if a useful trend can be observed as a result. This trend can be used to analyze certain probabilities. There are three main pieces of data which are being analyzed in this research: The value for δ of the call and put option, the %B value of the stock, and the amount of time until expiration of the stock option. The %B value is the most important. The purpose of analyzing the data is to see the relationship between the variables and, given certain values, …

Contributors
Reeves, Michael Thomas, Richa, Andrea, McCarville, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2015

In trading, volume is a measure of how much stock has been exchanged in a given period of time. Since every stock is distinctive and has an alternate measure of shares, volume can be contrasted with historical volume inside a stock to spot changes. It is likewise used to affirm value patterns, breakouts, and spot potential reversals. In my thesis, I hypothesize that the concept of trading volume can be extrapolated to social media (Twitter). The ubiquity of social media, especially Twitter, in financial market has been overly resonant in the past couple of years. With the growth of its …

Contributors
Awasthi, Piyush, Davulcu, Hasan, Tong, Hanghang, et al.
Created Date
2015

This dissertation establishes a national exploration into the subnational fiscal policies of the United States at the county level of government. This dissertation begins a dialog about county fiscal practices and examines budget stabilization policies of county governments across the country and studies how county governments are codifying the action of setting funds aside for use during times of need. The study moves from the descriptive analysis of counties and explore quantitatively the effects of county government general fund balances and reserve practices over time and documents the reserves, revenue and expenditures of 43 counties across the United States over …

Contributors
Flick, Angie, Reilly, Thomas, Miller, Gerald J, et al.
Created Date
2018

I study the relation between firm debt structure and future external financing and investment. I find that greater reliance on long-term debt is associated with increased access to external financing and ability to undertake profitable investments. This contrasts with previous empirical results and theoretical predictions from the agency cost literature, but it is consistent with predictions regarding rollover risk. Furthermore, I find that firms with lower total debt (high debt capacity) have greater access to new financing and investment. Lower leverage increases future debt issues and capital expenditures, and firms do not fully rebalance by reducing the use of external …

Contributors
Flynn, Sean, Tserlukevich, Yuri, Hertzel, Mike, et al.
Created Date
2017

I study the performance of hedge fund managers, using quarterly stock holdings from 1995 to 2010. I use the holdings-based measure built on Ferson and Mo (2012) to decompose a manager's overall performance into stock selection and three components of timing ability: market return, volatility, and liquidity. At the aggregate level, I find that hedge fund managers have stock picking skills but no timing skills, and overall I do not find strong evidence to support their superiority. I show that the lack of abilities is driven by the large fluctuations of timing performance with market conditions. I find that conditioning …

Contributors
Kang, Minjeong, Aragon, George O, Hertzel, Michael G, et al.
Created Date
2013

Firms reduce investment when facing downward wage rigidity (DWR), the inability or unwillingness to adjust wages downward. I construct DWR measures and exploit staggered state-level changes in minimum wage laws as an exogenous variation in DWR to document this fact. Following a minimum wage increase, firms reduce their investment rate by 1.17 percentage points. Surprisingly, this labor market friction enhances firm value and production efficiency when firms are subject to other frictions causing overinvestment, consistent with the theory of second best. Finally, I identify increased operating leverage and aggravation of debt overhang as mechanisms by which DWR impedes investment. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Cho, DuckKi, Bharath, Sreedhar, Hertzel, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2017

This dissertation consists of two essays on corporate policy. The first chapter analyzes whether being labeled a “growth” firm or a “value” firm affects the firm’s dividend policy. I focus on the dividend policy because of its discretionary nature and the link to investor demand. To address endogeneity concerns, I use regression discontinuity design around the threshold to assign firms to each category. The results show that “value” firms have a significantly higher dividend payout - about four percentage points - than growth firms. This approach establishes a causal link between firm “growth/value” labels and dividend policy. The second chapter …

Contributors
Lee, Tae Eui, Mehra, Rajnish, Tserlukevich, Yuri, et al.
Created Date
2015