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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Molybdenum and uranium isotope variations are potentially powerful tools for reconstructing the paleoredox history of seawater. Reliable application and interpretation of these proxies requires not only detailed knowledge about the fractionation factors that control the distribution of molybdenum and uranium isotopes in the marine system, but also a thorough understanding of the diagenetic processes that may affect molybdenum and uranium isotopes entering the rock record. Using samples from the Black Sea water column, the first water column profile of 238U/235U variations from a modern euxinic basin has been measured. This profile allows the direct determination of the 238U/235U fractionation factor …

Contributors
Romaniello, Stephen, Anbar, Ariel, Hartnett, Hilairy, et al.
Created Date
2012

The beginning of our Solar System, including events such as the formation of the first solids as well as the accretion and differentiation of planetary bodies, is recorded in meteoritic material. This record can be deciphered using petrographic, geochemical and isotopic investigations of different classes of meteorites and their components. In this dissertation, I have investigated a variety of isotope systematics in chondritic and achondritic meteorites to understand processes that have shaped our Solar System. Specifically, the investigations conducted here are in two main areas: 1) Hydrogen isotope systematics in a meteorite representing the freshest known sample of the martian …

Contributors
Mane, Prajkta, Wadhwa, Meenakshi, Hervig, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2016

The hydrothermal chemistry of organic compounds influences many critical geological processes, including the formation of oil and gas reservoirs, the degradation and transport of organic matter in sedimentary basins, metabolic cycles in the deep subsurface biosphere, and possibly prebiotic organic synthesis related to the origin of life. In most previous studies of hydrothermal organic reactions the emphasis has been mainly on determining reaction product distributions, studies that provide detailed mechanistic information or direct evidence for specific reaction intermediates are rare. To develop a better understanding, I performed hydrothermal experiments with model ketone compound dibenzylketone (DBK), which serves as a quite …

Contributors
Yang, Ziming, Shock, Everett L, Gould, Ian R, et al.
Created Date
2014

Harsh environments have conditions that make collecting scientific data difficult with existing commercial-off-the-shelf technology. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is ideally suited for harsh environment characterization and operation due to the wide range of materials available and an incredible array of different sensing techniques while providing small device size, low power consumption, and robustness. There were two main objectives of the research conducted. The first objective was to design, fabricate, and test novel sensors that measure the amount of exposure to ionizing radiation for a wide range of applications including characterization of harsh environments. Two types of MEMS ionizing …

Contributors
Oiler, Jonathon, Yu, Hongyu, Anbar, Ariel, et al.
Created Date
2013

Oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) is a thermodynamic variable used to represent the redox state of a material or a system. It is equivalent to the partial pressure of oxygen in a particular environment corrected for the non-ideal behavior of the gas. ƒO2 is often used to indicate the potential for iron to occur in a more oxidized or reduced state at a particular temperature and pressure in a natural system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a powerful analytical instrument that can be used to analyze elemental and isotopic compositional information about microscopic features within solid materials. SIMS analyses of the …

Contributors
Dillon, Sarah Marie, Hervig, Richard L, Shim, Sang-Heon, et al.
Created Date
2019

In many natural systems aqueous geochemical conditions dictate the reaction pathways of organic compounds. Geologic settings that span wide ranges in temperature, pressure, and composition vastly alter relative reaction rates and resulting organic abundances. The dependence of organic reactions on these variables contributes to planetary-scale nutrient cycling, and suggests that relative abundances of organic compounds can reveal information about inaccessible geologic environments, whether from the terrestrial subsurface, remote planetary settings, or even the distant past (if organic abundances are well preserved). Despite their relevance to planetary modeling and exploration, organic reactions remain poorly characterized under geochemically relevant conditions, especially in …

Contributors
Robinson, Kirtland John, Shock, Everett L, Herckes, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2017

Sustainable materials and methods have achieved a pivotal role in the research plethora of the new age due to global warming. Cement production is responsible in contributing to 5% of global CO2 emissions. Complete replacement of cement by alkaline activation of aluminosilicate waste materials such as slag and fly ash is a major advancement towards reducing the adverse impacts of cement production. Comprehensive research has been done, to understand the optimized composition and hydration products. The focus of this dissertation is to understand the multiscale behavior ranging from early age properties, fundamental material structure, fracture and crack resistance properties, durability …

Contributors
Dakhane, Akash, Neithalath, Narayanan, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2016

Hydrothermal environments are important locales for carbon cycling on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe. Below its maximum temperature (~73 °C), microbial photosynthesis drives primary productivity in terrestrial hydrothermal ecosystems, which is thought to be performed by bacterial phototrophs in alkaline systems and eukaryotic algae in acidic systems, yet has received little attention at pH values intermediate to these extremes. Sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes was performed at 12 hot springs with pH values 2.9-5.6 and revealed that cyanobacteria affiliated with the genus Chlorogloeopsis and algae of the order Cyanidiales coexisted at 10 of the sites. Cyanobacteria were …

Contributors
Fecteau, Kristopher, Shock, Everett L, Gould, Ian R, et al.
Created Date
2016

Hydrothermal systems are not the typical environments in which organic chemistry is studied. However the organic reactions happening there are increasingly implicated in non-trivial geochemical processes. For example, the origins of life, the formation and degradation of petroleum, and feeding the deep biosphere. These are environments where water is heated and pressurized until it has a polarity more typical of an organic solvent and an increased dissociation constant that decreases its pH. In addition, these environments host many transition metal oxide and sulfide minerals that are not inert bystanders to the chemistry happening around them. This thesis takes from the …

Contributors
Shipp, Jessie Anita, Hartnett, Hilairy H., Gould, Ian R., et al.
Created Date
2013

The focus of this thesis is to study dissolved organic carbon composition and reactivity along the Colorado and Green Rivers. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in large-scale, managed rivers is relatively poorly studied as most literature has focused on pristine unmanaged rivers. The Colorado River System is the 7th largest in the North America; there are seventeen large dams along the Colorado and Green River. DOC in rivers and in the lakes formed by dams (reservoirs) undergo photo-chemical and bio-degradation. DOC concentration and composition in these systems were investigated using bulk concentration, optical properties, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The riverine DOC concentration …

Contributors
Bowman, Margaret Mae, Hartnett, Hilairy E, Hayes, Mark A, et al.
Created Date
2015