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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2011 2019


Shock metamorphism in meteorites constrains the impact histories of asteroids and planets. Shock-induced high-pressure (HP) minerals can provide more precise estimates of shock conditions than shock-induced deformation effects. In this research, I use shock features, particularly HP minerals, in ordinary-chondrite samples to constrain not only shock pressures but also the pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) paths they experienced. Highly shocked L5/6 chondrites Acfer 040, Mbale, NWA 091 and Chico and LL6 chondrite NWA 757 were used to investigate a variety of shock pressures and post-shock annealing histories. NWA 757 is the only highly shocked LL chondrite that includes abundant HP minerals. The assemblage …

Contributors
Hu, Jinping, Sharp, Thomas G., Tyburczy, James A., et al.
Created Date
2016

The present work covers two distinct microanalytical studies that address issues in planetary materials: (1) Genesis Na and K solar wind (SW) measurements, and (2) the effect of water on high-pressure olivine phase transformations. NASA’s Genesis mission collected SW samples for terrestrial analysis to create a baseline of solar chemical abundances based on direct measurement of solar material. Traditionally, solar abundances are estimated using spectroscopic or meteoritic data. This study measured bulk SW Na and K in two different Genesis SW collector materials (diamond-like carbon (DlC) and silicon) for comparison with these other solar references. Novel techniques were developed for …

Contributors
Rieck, Karen Dianne, Hervig, Richard L, Sharp, Thomas G, et al.
Created Date
2015

East African extensional basins have played a crucial role in revealing the evolution and characteristics of the early stages of continental rifting and for providing the geological context of hominin evolution and innovation. The numerous volcanic eruptions, rapid sedimentation and burial, and subsequent exposure through faulting and erosion, provide excellent conditions for the preservation of tectonic history, paleoenvironment data, and vertebrate fossils. The reconstruction of depositional environments and provision of geochronologic frameworks for hominin sites have been largely provided by geologic investigations in conjunction with paleontological studies, like the Ledi-Geraru Research Project (LGRP). High-resolution paleoclimate records that can be directly …

Contributors
Garello, Dominique Ines, Arrowsmith, Ramon, Campisano, Chris J, et al.
Created Date
2019

Chemical and mineralogical data from Mars shows that the surface has been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical trends and the types of chemical weathering products present on the surface and their abundances can elucidate information about past aqueous processes. Thermal-infrared (TIR) data and their respective models are essential for interpreting Martian mineralogy and geologic history. However, previous studies have shown that chemical weathering and the precipitation of fine-grained secondary silicates can adversely affect the accuracy of TIR spectral models. Furthermore, spectral libraries used to identify minerals on the Martian surface lack some important weathering products, including poorly-crystalline …

Contributors
Rampe, Elizabeth Barger, Sharp, Thomas G, Christensen, Phillip, et al.
Created Date
2011

The present understanding of the formation and evolution of the earliest bodies in the Solar System is based in large part on geochemical and isotopic evidences contained within meteorites. The differentiated meteorites (meteorites originating from bodies that have experienced partial to complete melting) are particularly useful for deciphering magmatic processes occurring in the early Solar System. A rare group of differentiated meteorites, the angrites, are uniquely suited for such work. The angrites have ancient crystallization ages, lack secondary processing, and have been minimally affected by shock metamorphism, thus allowing them to retain their initial geochemical and isotopic characteristics at the …

Contributors
Sanborn, Matthew Edward, Wadhwa, Meenakshi, Hervig, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2012

Banded iron formations (BIFs) are among the earliest possible indicators for oxidation of the Archean biosphere. However, the origin of BIFs remains debated. Proposed formation mechanisms include oxidation of Fe(II) by O2 (Cloud, 1973), photoferrotrophy (Konhauser et al., 2002), and abiotic UV photooxidation (Braterman et al., 1983; Konhauser et al., 2007). Resolving this debate could help determine whether BIFs are really indicators of O2, biological activity, or neither. To examine the viability of abiotic UV photooxidation of Fe, laboratory experiments were conducted in which Fe-bearing solutions were irradiated with different regions of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and Fe oxidation and …

Contributors
Castleberry, Parker, Anbar, Ariel D, Herckes, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2017

This dissertation examines two topics of emerging interest in the field of organic geochemistry. The topic of the first portion of the dissertation is cold organic geochemistry on Saturn's moon Titan. Titan has an atmosphere and surface that are rich in organic compounds. Liquid hydrocarbons exist on the surface, most famously as lakes. Photochemical reactions produce solid organics in Titan's atmosphere, and these materials settle onto the surface. At the surface, liquids can interact with solids, and geochemical processes can occur. To better understand these processes, I developed a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate the solubilities of …

Contributors
Glein, Christopher R., Shock, Everett L, Hartnett, Hilairy E, et al.
Created Date
2012

Natural variations in 238U/235U of marine carbonates might provide a useful way of constraining redox conditions of ancient environments. In order to evaluate the reliability of this proxy, we conducted aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments at pH ~7.5 and ~ 8.5 to study possible U isotope fractionation during incorporation into these minerals. Small but significant U isotope fractionation was observed in aragonite experiments at pH ~ 8.5, with heavier U in the solid phase. 238U/235U of dissolved U in these experiments can be fit by Rayleigh fractionation curves with fractionation factors of 1.00007+0.00002/-0.00003, 1.00005 ± 0.00001, and 1.00003 ± 0.00001. …

Contributors
Chen, Xinming, Anbar, Ariel, Herckes, Pierre, et al.
Created Date
2015

There is a growing body of evidence that the evolving redox structure of the oceans has been an important influence on the evolutionary trajectory of animals. However, current understanding of connections between marine redox conditions and marine extinctions and recoveries is hampered by limited detailed knowledge of the timing, duration, and extent of marine redox changes. The recent development of U isotopes (δ238U) in carbonates as a global ocean redox proxy has provided new insight into this problem. Reliable application and interpretation of the δ238U paleoproxy in geological records requires a thorough understanding of the reliability of δ238U recorded by …

Contributors
Zhang, Feifei, Anbar, Ariel, Gordon, Gwyneth, et al.
Created Date
2018

Historically, uranium has received intense study of its chemical and isotopic properties for use in the nuclear industry, but has been largely ignored by geoscientists despite properties that make it an intriguing target for geochemists and cosmochemists alike. Uranium was long thought to have an invariant 238U/235U ratio in natural samples, making it uninteresting for isotopic work. However, recent advances in mass spectrometry have made it possible to detect slight differences in the 238U/235U ratio, creating many exciting new opportunities for U isotopic research. Using uranium ore samples from diverse depositional settings from around the world, it is shown that …

Contributors
Brennecka, Gregory Adam, Anbar, Ariel D, Wadhwa, Meenakshi, et al.
Created Date
2011