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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The winter holiday period has been highlighted as a major risk period for weight gain due to excess caloric intake in the form of fat and sugar. Furthermore, diets high in fat and sugar have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exercise aids in the prevention of weight/fat gain, and prevents deleterious changes in cardiometabolic function. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a fat-sugar supplemented diet, with and without two different exercise training protocols, on body composition, glycemic control and other markers of cardiovascular disease in an at-risk population of overweight …

Contributors
Tucker, Wesley Jack, Gaesser, Glenn A, Angadi, Siddhartha S, et al.
Created Date
2016

Cardiovascular disease and diabetes are major health burdens. Diabetes is a primary risk factor of cardiovascular disease, and there is a strong link between obesity and risk of developing diabetes. With the prevalence of prediabetes highest among overweight/obese individuals, investigation into preventative strategies are needed. Aerobic exercise is a potent stimulus for both insulin and non-insulin dependent glucose uptake into the skeletal muscle. A single exercise session can improve insulin sensitivity within hours after exercise. The effects of intensity, type, and volume of exercise on glucose homeostasis have been studied extensively; however, controlling for muscle contraction frequency with a constant …

Contributors
Jarrett, Catherine Lee, Gaesser, Glenn A, Angadi, Siddhartha S, et al.
Created Date
2017

The effects of aging on muscular efficiency are controversial. Proponents for increased efficiency suggest that age-related changes in muscle enhance efficiency in senescence. Exercise study results are mixed due to varying modalities, ages, and efficiency calculations. The present study attempted to address oxygen uptake, caloric expenditure, walking economy, and gross/net cycling efficiency in young (18-59 years old) and older (60-81 years old) adults (N=444). Walking was performed at three miles per hour by 86 young (mean = 29.60, standard deviation (SD) = 10.50 years old) and 121 older adults (mean = 66.80, SD = 4.50 years old). Cycling at 50 …

Contributors
Flores, Michelle Alana, Gaesser, Glenn A, Campbell, Kathryn D, et al.
Created Date
2014

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) declines with age and is a predictor of morbidity and mortality risks. Due to these implications, accurate assessment and determination of VO2max are important for the older population. Without the presence of a VO2 plateau, secondary criteria are used to determine whether the test resulted in a maximal value. However, inconsistent secondary criteria do not account for intersubject variability. To circumvent this issue, a verification phase following a traditional ramp assessment may be utilized. The purpose of this study was to compare verification phase strategies in older adults. A secondary purpose of this study was to …

Contributors
Villanueva, Ian Robert, Dickinson, Jared M, Gaesser, Glenn A, et al.
Created Date
2019