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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients suffer from fatigue and a reduced overall quality of life, both of which are not resolved with current pharmacologic therapy. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 12-week online-streamed yoga intervention on fatigue and QoL in MPN patients as compared to a wait-list control group as well as to determine the feasibility of remotely collecting blood and saliva samples in a national sample. MPN patients were asked to complete 60 min/week of online yoga for 12 weeks. MPN fatigue and QoL were assessed online with single-item questions taken from the MPN …

Contributors
Eckert, Ryan, Huberty, Jennifer, Mesa, Ruben, et al.
Created Date
2017

Introduction: Less than half of U.S. adults meet the aerobic physical activity guidelines to exercise at least 150 minutes a week. An individual's decision to be physically active is influenced by their perceptions of physical activity. To address perceptions, interventions need to be implemented where adults spend one third of their day; the workplace. A number of physical activity interventions have been conducted and few have been successful at improving physical activity; therefore, there is a need to explore novel approaches to improve physical activity in the worksite. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the impact of …

Contributors
Rowedder, Lacey, Huberty, Jennifer, Chisum, Jack, et al.
Created Date
2014

College students experience a considerable amount of stress. Unmanaged stress is associated with poor academic performance, health risk behaviors (i.e., inadequate sleep and physical activity, alcohol consumption, poor dietary behaviors), and poor mental health. Coping with stress has become a priority among universities. The most tested stress-related programs to date have been mindfulness-based and face-to-face. These programs demonstrated significant improvements in stress, mindfulness, and self-compassion among college students. However, they may be burdensome to students as studies report low attendance and low compliance due to class conflicts or not enough time. Few interventions have used more advanced technologies (i.e., mobile …

Contributors
Glissmann, Christine, Huberty, Jennifer, Sebren, Ann, et al.
Created Date
2018

Background: Although childhood engagement in physical activity has received growing attention, most children still do not meet the recommended daily 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA]. Children of ethnic minorities are less likely to meet the guidelines. Interventions have been implemented in various settings to increase child physical activity levels, yet these efforts have not yielded consistent results. The purpose of this study was to assess the preliminary effects of a community-based intervention on light physical activity and MVPA among 6-11 year old children. Methods: The present study was part of a larger study called Athletes for …

Contributors
Quezada, Blanca Jennifer, Crespo, Noe, Huberty, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2015

Physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and sleep are often associated with cardiometabolic biomarkers commonly found in metabolic syndrome. These relationships are well studied, and yet there are still questions on how each activity may affect cardiometabolic biomarkers. The objective of this study was to examine data from the BeWell24 studies to evaluate the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors and cardiometabolic biomarkers in middle age adults, while also determining if sleep quality and duration mediates this relationship. A group of inactive participants (N = 29, age = 52.1 ± 8.1 years, 38% female) with increased risk for cardiometabolic …

Contributors
Lanich, Boyd, Buman, Matthew, Ainsworth, Barbara, et al.
Created Date
2017