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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


College students experience a considerable amount of stress. Unmanaged stress is associated with poor academic performance, health risk behaviors (i.e., inadequate sleep and physical activity, alcohol consumption, poor dietary behaviors), and poor mental health. Coping with stress has become a priority among universities. The most tested stress-related programs to date have been mindfulness-based and face-to-face. These programs demonstrated significant improvements in stress, mindfulness, and self-compassion among college students. However, they may be burdensome to students as studies report low attendance and low compliance due to class conflicts or not enough time. Few interventions have used more advanced technologies (i.e., mobile …

Contributors
Glissmann, Christine, Huberty, Jennifer, Sebren, Ann, et al.
Created Date
2018

Background. Effects of lifestyle interventions on early biomarkers of oxidative stress and CVD risk in youth with prediabetes are unknown. Objective. To evaluate the effects of a lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes among obese prediabetic Latino adolescents on oxidized lipoproteins. Design: In a quasi-experimental design, 35 adolescents (51.4% male, age 15.5(1.0) y, body mass index (BMI) percentile 98.5(1.2), and glucose 2 hours after an oral glucose tolerance test-OGTT 141.2(12.2) mg/dL) participated in a 12-week intervention that included weekly exercise (three 60 min-sessions) and nutrition education (one 60 min-session). Outcomes measured at baseline and post-intervention were: fasting oxidized LDL …

Contributors
Renteria Mexia, Ana Maria, Shaibi, Gabriel Q, vega-López, Sonia, et al.
Created Date
2017

Introduction: Less than half of U.S. adults meet the aerobic physical activity guidelines to exercise at least 150 minutes a week. An individual's decision to be physically active is influenced by their perceptions of physical activity. To address perceptions, interventions need to be implemented where adults spend one third of their day; the workplace. A number of physical activity interventions have been conducted and few have been successful at improving physical activity; therefore, there is a need to explore novel approaches to improve physical activity in the worksite. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the impact of …

Contributors
Rowedder, Lacey, Huberty, Jennifer, Chisum, Jack, et al.
Created Date
2014

Previous research on gymnastics injuries has examined several differences in the types of injuries and event/location where injury is most likely to occur. This research shows that male gymnasts are more likely to have more upper body injuries compared to lower body injuries whereas female gymnasts are more likely to have lower body injuries. The majority of all gymnastics injuries are sprains that are most likely to occur during the landing phase on the floor exercise during routine performance or competition. Gymnastics injuries are also more prevalent in older gymnasts, like those at the collegiate level. However, there is limited …

Contributors
Price, Callie, Chisum, Jack, Lee, Chong, et al.
Created Date
2013

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death in the United States and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity lead to cardiovascular disease. Obese adults are more susceptible to CVD compared to their non-obese counterparts. Exercise training leads to large reductions in the risk of CVD and T2D. Recent evidence suggests high-intensity interval training (HIT) may yield similar or superior benefits in a shorter amount of time compared to traditional continuous exercise training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of HIT to continuous (CONT) exercise training for the improvement of endothelial function, glucose control, …

Contributors
Sawyer, Brandon, Gaesser, Glenn A, Shaibi, Gabriel, et al.
Created Date
2013