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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the effect a daily coconut oil supplement (2 grams) would have on a common serum marker of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein) and an indicator of oxidative stress (TBARS) when compared to the control group receiving a placebo capsule (white flour) in healthy, sedentary adults between the ages of 18-40 in Phoenix, Arizona. Design: This study was designed as secondary analyses of blood samples originally collected to study the effects of coconut oil supplementation on blood lipids and body composition. The original study consisted of 32 healthy, adult volunteers …

Contributors
Norman, Lisa Marie, Johnston, Carol, Shepard, Christina, et al.
Created Date
2017

A core principle in multiple national quality improvement strategies is the engagement of chronically ill patients in the creation and execution of their treatment plans. Numerous initiatives are underway to use health information technology (HIT) to support patient engagement however the use of HIT and other factors such as health literacy may be significant barriers to engagement for older adults. This qualitative descriptive study sought to explore the ways that older adults with multi-morbidities engaged with their plan of care. Forty participants were recruited through multiple case sampling from two ambulatory cardiology practices. Participants were English-speaking, without a dementia-related diagnosis, …

Contributors
Jiggins Colorafi, Karen Lynn, Lamb, Gerri, Marek, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2015

The effects of aging on muscular efficiency are controversial. Proponents for increased efficiency suggest that age-related changes in muscle enhance efficiency in senescence. Exercise study results are mixed due to varying modalities, ages, and efficiency calculations. The present study attempted to address oxygen uptake, caloric expenditure, walking economy, and gross/net cycling efficiency in young (18-59 years old) and older (60-81 years old) adults (N=444). Walking was performed at three miles per hour by 86 young (mean = 29.60, standard deviation (SD) = 10.50 years old) and 121 older adults (mean = 66.80, SD = 4.50 years old). Cycling at 50 …

Contributors
Flores, Michelle Alana, Gaesser, Glenn A, Campbell, Kathryn D, et al.
Created Date
2014

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. While physical activity can reduce CVD risk, most adults do not engage in adequate physical activity to maintain or improve health. Older adults are less likely to participate in physical activity and experience a greater burden of CVD compared to younger adults. Despite knowledge of motivators and barriers to physical activity, the challenge to reduce cardiovascular risk in the older adult population remains unmet. Older adults face unique and complex barriers to physical activity, including limited social contextual resources and behavioral change processes. Interventions to enhance wellness motivation …

Contributors
Barrows, Jennifer, Fleury, Julie, Komnenich, Pauline, et al.
Created Date
2018