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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Background and purpose: Regular physical activity (PA) provides benefits for cognitive health and helps to improve or maintain quality of life among older adults. Objective PA measures have been increasingly used to overcome limitations of self-report measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of objectively measured PA and sedentary time with cognitive function among older adults. Methods: Participants were recruited from the parent REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study. ActicalTM accelerometers provided estimates of PA variables, including moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), high light PA (HLPA), low light PA (LLPA) and sedentary time, for …

Contributors
Zhu, Wenfei, Hooker, Steven P, Wadley, Virginia, et al.
Created Date
2015

Active transportation to school (ATS) has received an increasing amount of attention over the past decade due to its promising health contributions. Most of the existing research that surrounds ATS investigates factors from the physical environment as well as factors from the individual perspective that influence walking and biking to school. This research attempts to add to the existing knowledge by exploring the impact that social relationships within the neighborhood have on ATS. A model, based on social ecological theory, was presented and tested to examine elements thought to influence ATS. A logistic regression analysis was run to determine the …

Contributors
Ross, Allison, Searle, Mark, Knopf, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2015

This body of research sought to explore relationships between parenting practices, physical activity resources, and Hispanic children’s physical activity. Guided by the Family Ecological Model (FEM) and the Ecological Model of Physical Activity (EMPA) this study examined the influence of parents on children’s physical activity through an integrative review. A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate potential relationships between parental perception safety at school, gender, and children’s physical activity. A cross sectional study was also utilized to examine potential correlations between parenting practices, physical activity resources, and children’s physical activity. Parental role modeling of physical activity and parental support …

Contributors
Hutchens, Amy, Lee, Rebecca E, Todd, Michael, et al.
Created Date
2017

Background: Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization in older adults and has the highest 30-day readmission rate of all diagnoses. An estimated 30 to 60 percent of older adults lose some degree of physical function in the course of an acute hospital stay. Few studies have addressed the role of posture and mobility in contributing to, or improving, physical function in older hospitalized adults. No study to date that we are aware of has addressed this in the older heart failure population. Purpose: To investigate the predictive value of mobility during a hospital stay and patterns of mobility …

Contributors
Floegel, Theresa, Buman, Matthew P, Hooker, Steven, et al.
Created Date
2015

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. While physical activity can reduce CVD risk, most adults do not engage in adequate physical activity to maintain or improve health. Older adults are less likely to participate in physical activity and experience a greater burden of CVD compared to younger adults. Despite knowledge of motivators and barriers to physical activity, the challenge to reduce cardiovascular risk in the older adult population remains unmet. Older adults face unique and complex barriers to physical activity, including limited social contextual resources and behavioral change processes. Interventions to enhance wellness motivation …

Contributors
Barrows, Jennifer, Fleury, Julie, Komnenich, Pauline, et al.
Created Date
2018