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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Subject
Date Range
2010 2019


Nowadays ports play a critic role in the supply chains of contemporary companies and global commerce. Since the ports' operational effectiveness is critical on the development of competitive supply chains, their contribution to regional economies is essential. With the globalization of markets, the traffic of containers flowing through the different ports has increased significantly in the last decades. In order to attract additional container traffic and improve their comparative advantages over the competition, ports serving same hinterlands explore ways to improve their operations to become more attractive to shippers. This research explores the hypothesis that lowering the variability of the …

Contributors
Meneses Preciado, Cesar Vladimir, Villalobos, Jesus R, Gel, Esma S, et al.
Created Date
2011

This thesis consists of three projects employing complexity economics methods to explore firm dynamics. The first is the Firm Ecosystem Model, which addresses the institutional conditions of capital access and entrenched competitive advantage. Larger firms will be more competitive than smaller firms due to efficiencies of scale, but the persistence of larger firms is also supported institutionally through mechanisms such as tax policy, capital access mechanisms and industry-favorable legislation. At the same time, evidence suggests that small firms innovate more than larger firms, and an aggressive firm-as-value perspective incentivizes early investment in new firms in an attempt to capture that …

Contributors
Applegate, J M, Janssen, Marcus A, Hoetker, Glenn, et al.
Created Date
2018

Current information on successful leadership and management practices is contradictory and inconsistent, which makes difficult to understand what successful business practices are and what are not. The purpose of this study is to identify a simple process that quickly and logically identifies consistent and inconsistent leadership and management criteria. The hypothesis proposed is that Information Measurement Theory (IMT) along with the Kashiwagi Solution Model (KSM) is a methodology than can differentiate between accurate and inaccurate principles the initial part of the study about authors in these areas show how information is conflictive, and also served to establish an initial baseline …

Contributors
Reynolds, Harry, Kashiwagi, Dean, Sullivan, Kenneth, et al.
Created Date
2011

Hotel amenities and their influence on consumer choice have been extensively studied by academics. These have largely focused on consumer preferences vacation modes and the psychographic characteristics of travelers. Revenue managers make practical use of this information by attempting to match available hotel rooms with traveler demands for accommodations, setting prices that maximize profits for the hospitality company. The experienced revenue manger is able to determine the most profitable price schedule for a room types across many distribution channels. This study was conducted to test the use of choice modeling for objectively assessing dollar values of three basic amenities for …

Contributors
Johnston, Adriana Kale, Lacher, Richard, Chapman, Jeffrey, et al.
Created Date
2014

The wood-framing trade has not sufficiently been investigated to understand the work task sequencing and coordination among crew members. A new mental framework for a performing crew was developed and tested through four case studies. This framework ensured similar team performance as the one provided by task micro-scheduling in planning software. It also allowed evaluation of the effect of individual coordination within the crew on the crew's productivity. Using design information, a list of micro-activities/tasks and their predecessors was automatically generated for each piece of lumber in the four wood frames. The task precedence was generated by applying elementary geometrical …

Contributors
Maghiar, Marcel, Wiezel, Avi, Mitropoulos, Panagiotis, et al.
Created Date
2011

The construction industry faces important performance problems such as low productivity, poor quality of work, and work-related accidents and injuries. Creating a high reliability work system that is simultaneously highly productive and exceptionally safe has become a challenge for construction practitioners and scholars. The main goal of this dissertation was to create an understanding of high reliability construction work systems based on lessons from the production practices of high performance work crews. High performance work crews are defined as the work crews that constantly reach and maintain a high level of productivity and exceptional safety record while delivering high quality …

Contributors
Memarian, Babak, Bashford, Howard, Boren, Rebecca, et al.
Created Date
2012

Front End Planning (FEP) is a critical process for uncovering project unknowns, while developing adequate scope definition following a structured approach for the project execution process. FEP for infrastructure projects assists in identifying and mitigating issues such as right-of-way concerns, utility adjustments, environmental hazards, logistic problems, and permitting requirements. This thesis describes a novel and effective risk management tool that has been developed by the Construction Industry Institute (CII) called the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) for infrastructure projects. Input from industry professionals from over 30 companies was used in the tool development which is specifically focused on FEP. Data …

Contributors
Bingham, Evan Dale, Gibson Jr., G. Edward, Badger, William, et al.
Created Date
2010

This dissertation integrates research on boards of directors with human and social capital perspectives to examine board appointments. A director's appointment to a board is in part due to the belief that the individual can contribute critical resources and monitoring to the organization. The ability of a director to provide these resources and monitoring depends on his or her level of human and social capital. This dissertation more fully integrates human and social capital perspectives into our understanding of board appointment events. From these theoretical underpinnings, a model is developed proposing that several human and social capital indicators, including educational …

Contributors
Withers, Michael C., Hillman, Amy J., Certo, S. Trevis, et al.
Created Date
2011

Human resources have always been the most critical factor in the construction industry, and now, with a historic generation entering the age of retirement, the construction industry needs to place greater effort in preparing for the succession of their most important of human resource, their leaders. A significant body of research has shown that succession planning minimizes the negative effects that come with leadership transition; however, little research has focused specifically on the construction industry. The majority of construction companies are family owned or have small pools of potential successors, which make them more susceptible to the negative impacts that …

Contributors
Perrenoud, Anthony, Sullivan, Kenneth T, Badger, William, et al.
Created Date
2012

I develop and test theoretical hypotheses for how employees' authenticity at work influences their motivational, relational, and effectiveness outcomes. These hypotheses are grounded in the idea that when individuals feel they display their true selves at work, they can more fully employ their physical, cognitive and emotional energies in their work roles, which in turn leads to higher levels of employee effectiveness (e.g., task performance, perceived value to the organization, and promotability). In addition to this personal motivational process, individuals who are more authentic also develop high-quality relationships with their coworkers, thereby receiving more instrumental support and minimizing the antagonistic …

Contributors
Buckman, Brooke R., LePine, Jeffery, Peterson, Suzanne, et al.
Created Date
2014